Gallery Gate

In California, 236,000 homes were lost to foreclosure in 2008, and an additional 190,360 were foreclosed upon in 2009. The housing boom and bust that consumed Southern California cost many people their homes, their savings and their jobs. The emotional repercussions of those changes are still rippling through families across the state. Here are first-hand accounts from five Southern California families as they deal with the reality of losing their homes. Michael and Betty Palmer bought their modest Pomona home as the housing market began to boom. Like many others, they were convinced the escalating equity was as good as cash. The mortgage is upside-down and the house went into foreclosure last April. and Erik Jimenez sought help with their unmanageable mortgage in 2008 after she had to leave her job in the fashion industry due to a complicated pregnancy. They sought help from a law group and were instructed them to stop making their house payments. Months later, they received a foreclosure notice and moved to an Upland apartment. Construction worker Ismael Cervantes owned a home in a historic Pomona neighborhood. As the economy crashed, so did his opportunity to work. He resorted to selling everything he owned to try to make payments on his upside down mortgage. He persisted in the face of foreclosure proceedings, and was able to short-sale his home.

Share/Bookmark

view Foreclosing On The American Dream as presented by: Los Angeles Times


oday, San Francisco is one of the top tourist destinations in the world, ranking 33rd out of the 100 most visited cities worldwide, and is renowned for its chilly summer fog, steep rolling hills, eclectic mix of architecture, and its famous landmarks, including the Golden Gate Bridge, cable cars, and Chinatown. Terence Chang loves SF & he proves it by his spectacular photography of the area. Featuring some of his great night / fog / aerial shots of the area & we hope that you like it. Do visit Terence’s Flickr page and check out his work.

Share/Bookmark

view San Francisco: The Cool, Grey City of Love as presented by: Viral Blender


With fierce barrages of tank and artillery fire, Moammar Gadhafi’s loyalists threw rebels into a frantic retreat from a strategic oil port Thursday in a counteroffensive that reversed the opposition’s advance toward the capital of Tripoli and now threatens its positions in the east. Hundreds of rebels in cars and trucks mounted with machine guns sped eastward on the Mediterranean coastal road in a seemingly disorganized flight from Ras Lanouf as an overwhelming force of rockets and shells pounded a hospital, mosque and other buildings in the oil complex. Doctors and staff at the hospital were hastily evacuated along with wounded from fighting from the past week. The rout came even as the opposition made diplomatic gains. France became the first country to recognize the rebels’ eastern-based governing council, and an ally of President Nicolas Sarkozy said his government was planning “targeted operations” to defend civilians if the international community approves. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said she would meet with opposition leaders in the U.S., Egypt and Tunisia. In Tripoli, Gadhafi’s son Seif al-Islam vowed to retake the eastern half of the country, which has been in opposition hands since early in the 3-week-old uprising. A Libyan volunteer carries ammunition on the outskirts of the eastern town of Ras Lanouf, Libya, Thursday, March 10, 2011. Government forces drove hundreds of rebels from a strategic oil port with rockets and tank shells on Thursday, significantly expanding Moammar Gadhafi's control of Libya. Libyan rebel fighters try to defend a gate of the north-central key Libyan oil town of Ras Lanuf as Moamer Kadhafi's loyalist forces approach their positions on March 10, 2011, where at least four people were killed and 35 wounded as rebels retreated under continous government rocket and sniper fire. Anti-Libyan Leader Moammar Gadhafi rebel, sit next to a mulitiple rockets launcher as flames rises from a fuel storage facility that attacked during a fighting against pro-Moammar Gadhafi fighters, in Sidr town, eastern Libya, on Wednesday March 9, 2011. A high-ranking member of the Libyan military flew to Cairo on Wednesday with a message for Egyptian army officials from Moammar Gadhafi, whose troops pounded opposition forces with artillery barrages and gunfire in at least two major cities. Gadhafi appeared to be keeping up the momentum he has seized in recent days in his fight against rebels trying to move on the capital, Tripoli, from territory they hold in eastern Libya.

Share/Bookmark

view Captured: Gadhafi Troops Shell Rebels as presented by: Denver Post



What could be more satisfying than a nap? A nice nap taken while surrounded by piles of stuff. More photos of people taking naps while surrounded by stuff. North Korean workers nap on piles of fertilizer shipped from China on the banks of Yalu River near the North Korean town of Sinuiju. A worker sleeps on tangerines in a market in Siliguri, India. A vegetable vendor sleeps in his roadside shop in New Delhi, India.

Share/Bookmark

view People Taking Naps with Stuff as presented by: Boing Boing


From the titans of high technology to teenagers armed with iPads, millions of people around the world mourned digital-gadget genius Steve Jobs as a man whose wizardry transformed their lives in big ways and small. Google, Sony, Samsung, Microsoft -- corporate giants that have all been bruised in dustups with Jobs' baby, the technology prodigy Apple -- put their rivalries aside Thursday to remember the man behind the iconic products that define his generation: the iPod, the iPhone, the iPad. Fans for whom the Apple brand became a near-religion grasped for comparisons to history's great innovators, as well as its celebrities, to honor the man they credit with putting thousands of songs and the Internet in their pockets. In this Jan. 15, 2008, file photo, Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up the new MacBook Air after giving the keynote address at the Apple MacWorld Conference in San Francisco. A message is written on the window of the Apple Store in Santa Monica, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011.

Share/Bookmark

view Millions Mourn Genius Steve Jobs as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Relatives of the Catholic demonstrators shot to death by British troops on Northern Ireland’s Bloody Sunday cried tears of joy Tuesday as an epic fact-finding probe ruled that their loved ones were innocent and the soldiers entirely to blame for the 1972 slaughter. The investigation took 12 years and nearly 200 million pounds ($290 million), but the victims’ families and the British, Irish and U.S. governments welcomed the findings as priceless to heal one of the gaping wounds left from Northern Ireland’s four-decade conflict that left 3,700 dead. Thousands of residents of Londonderry – a predominantly Catholic city long synonymous with Britain’s major mass killing from the Northern Ireland conflict – gathered outside the city hall to watch the verdict come in, followed by a lengthy apology from Prime Minister David Cameron in London that moved many locals long distrustful of British leaders. The probe found that soldiers opened fire without justification at unarmed, fleeing civilians and lied about it for decades, refuting an initial British investigation that branded the demonstrators as Irish Republican Army bombers and gunmen. Cameron, who was just 5 years old when the attack occurred, said it was “both unjustified and unjustifiable.” A young child, resting on a man's shoulders, holds a hanging effigy of a British soldier during a march in Belfast, capital of Northern Ireland, Feb. 1972. The rally follows the deadly shooting of 14 demonstrators by British paratroopers during the civil rights march. A young mother and son from the Bogside area in Londonderry, stop infront of a mural, Thursday, Jan 30, 1997, depicting a scene from Bloody Sunday. The event occured 25 years ago, when British Troops opened fire during a civil rights march and 14 marchers were killed.

Share/Bookmark

view Northern Ireland’s Bloody Sunday Report Released as presented by: Denver Post


Last night American Football had it’s moment of glory at Super Bowl XLV in the Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. The Green Bay Packers took on the Pittsburgh Steelers for the Vince Lombardi trophy. Millions of sports fans watched the game on TV and they saw quarterback Aaron Rodgers and his Green Bay Packers win the game 31-25. Reporter Rebeca Rubio shows off her bicep to Green Bay Packers guard Evan Dietrich-Smith (R) during media day for Super Bowl XLV at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) sits with teammates during their official team photograph for Super Bowl XLV. Green Bay Packers head coach Mike McCarthy touches the Vince Lombardi trophy at a news conference in Dallas, Texas, February 4, 2011.

Share/Bookmark

view Super Bowl XLV as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


Last weekend in Glastonbury, England, on a site covering 1,000 acres, the 40th annual Glastonbury Festival was held at Worthy Farm. Started by a dairy farmer, Michael Evis in 1970 it has grown into the largest music festival in Europe. This year's headline acts on the main stage included Muse, Gorillaz and Stevie Wonder. Thousands of attendees were treated to a sunny weekend in the country with plenty to see, hear and experience. Collected here are 40 images from Glastonbury 2010 for its 40th anniversary. The first of the 140,000 music fans due at this year's Glastonbury Festival enjoy the sunset at Worthy Farm, Pilton on June 23, 2010 in Glastonbury, England. The gates opened this morning at 8am to what has become Europe's largest music festival and is celebrating its 40th anniversary. Snoop Dog performs with Damon Albarn of Gorillaz on the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury Festival 2010 on June 25, 2010. Revelers watch British Band Faithless perform during the Glastonbury Festival.

Share/Bookmark

view Glastonbury Festival 2010 as presented by: Boston Big Picture



view our privacy policy & terms of service