Gallery Gate

With the U.S. troop surge now nearing its peak in Afghanistan, more than 150,000 US and international troops are now on the ground. 64 of those troops lost their lives this month, as forces pushed hard into the southern Kandahar Province, traditionally the heartland of the Taliban. At the same time, preliminary discussions are beginning to take place between the inner circle of President Hamid Karzai and members of the Quetta shura, the leadership group that oversees the Taliban war effort inside Afghanistan. Part of the current coalition strategy is to continue applying pressure on the Taliban in the fields, and encouraging their leaders to participate in hoped-for settlement talks. Collected here are images of the country and conflict over the past month, part of an ongoing monthly series on Afghanistan. Afghan firemen hose down a burning oil tanker after an explosive device planted underneath it exploded, on the Jalalabad-Torkham highway, east of Kabul. Chief of Defense of the Swedish Armed Forces, General Sverker Göranson, place the Medal of Honor on the coffin of Kenneth Wallin, killed in action on an ISAF mission in Mazar-i Sharif in Afghanistan on Saturday, during a ceremony at Arna military airport north of Stockholm, Tuesday Oct. 19, 2010. Wallin was the 6th Swedish soldier killed in action in Afghanistan. Sgt. Thomas James Brennan of Randolph, Massachusetts, from the First Battalion Eighth Marines Alpha Company, smokes a cigarette in his bunk surrounded by photographs of his wife Melinda and their daughter Madison, 2, after a night of rain at the remote outpost of Kunjak in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province.

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view Afghanistan, October, 2010 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


A body has been found in the desert close to the spot where a pilot disappeared after crash-landing during the war. The wreckage of the P40 Kittyhawk plane was found perfectly preserved earlier this year, 70 years after the accident, and now it seems that airman Dennis Copping's remains may have been recovered nearby. The bones were located on some rocks four months ago, along with a piece of parachute, about three miles from where the plane landed in the Sahara desert in 1942. A keychain fob with the number 61 on it was found near the remains, along with a metal button dated 1939. But the pilot's relatives claim the Ministry of Defence said that the remains were not those of the lost airman. It has since been established that the bones were never recovered or analysed, leaving open the possibility they may be those of Flight Sergeant Copping. His nephew, William Pryor-Bennett, from Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland, has now urged for DNA tests to be carried out as soon as possible. To that end, two British historians and a forensic anatomist have volunteered to travel to Egypt and recover the bones themselves. Mr Pryor-Bennett, 62, said he is ‘appalled’ at the way the matter has been handled. He said: 'The bones suspected to be those of my uncle are apparently still lying in the desert. They were found in June and should have been tested by now.

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view Bones And A Parachute Found Near Eerily Preserved Plane That Crashed In Sahara Desert 70 Years Ago as presented by: Daily Mail Online


Back in November, the astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) began Expedition 34, and entered into the 13th year of its continuous human habitation. Some of the research goals for Expedition 34 included investigations into the human cardiovascular system in microgravity, the gravity-sensing systems of fish, and the impact of changes in the sun's electromagnetic radiation on Earth's climate. The crew of six astronauts from the United States, Russia, and Canada also took hundreds of photographs of life aboard the ISS and the spectacular views from orbit. Collected here are scenes from Expedition 34, and a few from the current mission, Expedition 35. Expedition 34 NASA Flight Engineer Chris Hadfield of the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), top, NASA Flight Engineer Tom Marshburn and Soyuz Commander Roman Romanenko wave farewell from the bottom of the Soyuz rocket at the Baikonur Cosmodrome. A photograph taken by a member of Expedition 34, aboard the International Space Station, looking down on the Bahamas from orbit. NASA astronaut Kevin Ford, Expedition 34 commander, watches a water bubble float freely between him and the camera, showing his image refracted, in the Unity node of the ISS.

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view The International Space Station: Expedition 34 as presented by: The Atlantic



With the summer solstice now two weeks gone, the northern hemisphere is heating up. High temperatures in some places have made working difficult and have taxed power grids as usage of electricity neared record levels in the U.S. This past weekend, the United States celebrated its 234th birthday on July 4th, with fireworks, parades and many other outdoor activities. Collected here today are a handful of recent photographs of people (and animals) either trying to beat the heat, or just enjoying a sunny summer's day. A volunteer scoops up an armful of yellow rubber ducks during the 3rd Annual Great Red, White & Blue Duck Race on Sunday, July 4, 2010 at the Rob Fleming Aquatic Center in The Woodlands, Texas. Over 8,000 rubber ducks made their way down the aquatic center's "lazy river." The event benefits the Montgomery County Emergency Assistance organization which helps residents of Montgomery County, Texas who are experiencing an unexpected financial need or crisis. A guest swims in the infinity pool of the Skypark that tops the Marina Bay Sands hotel towers in Singapore June 24, 2010. The Sands Skypark, which recently opened to the public, features a 150-meter infinity pool overlooking Singapore's city skyline and Marina Bay, a public observation deck and a restaurant run by a celebrity chef. A girl runs through water spraying from an open fire hydrant to keep cool in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York Monday July 5, 2010. Temperatures soared toward 100 degrees or more Tuesday along much of the East Coast after an extended Fourth of July weekend when temperatures inched into at least the 90s from Maine to Texas.

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view Summer is Here as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Architecture is one of the primary subject throughout the history of photography. Even though we are surrounded by Sky scrappers to shacks, it’s not easy to shoot them. It all depends on the photographer’s perspective. Above are some of the best shots we came across and we hope you like them as well.

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view The Art Of Architectural Photography as presented by: Viral Blender


BP was encouraged early Friday by results from an experimental cap on its busted Gulf of Mexico well, saying everything was holding steady 17 hours into the effort. BP vice president Kent Wells said on a conference call that there was no evidence of a leak in the pipe under the sea floor, one of the main concerns. Wells spoke 17 hours after valves were shut to trap oil inside the cap, a test that could last up to 48 hours. BP finally stopped oil from spewing into the sea Thursday, for the first time since an April 20 explosion on the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon oil rig killed 11 workers and unleashed the spill 5,000 feet beneath the water's surface. But the cap is a temporary measure. Even if it holds, BP needs to plug the gusher with cement and mud deep underground, where the seal will hold more permanently than any cap from above could. Rain falls on oil sheen on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil well leak off the coast of Louisiana Thursday, July 15, 2010. Crew members onboard the Pacific Responder oil skimming vessel prepared to skim oil this morning, but operations were put on standby after lightning was spotted nearby. A munson boat pulling boom passes a transrec machine as it is lifted back onto the deck of the Pacific Responder oil skimming vessel on the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana Thursday, July 15, 2010. The machine vacuums oily water contained by the booms into tanks on the vessel, where it can then be separated. Booms pulled by the Pacific Responder oil skimming vessel contain oil on the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana.

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view Experimental Cap Stops Oil Flowing Into The Gulf as presented by: Sacramento Bee


There are many interesting things left after World War II which can be found not in military museums but in private collections. These ones were found in the collections of Russians. This is what a bullet hole looks like on the helmet. By the way, this helmet is able to protect one’s head only when the splinter hits it at a sliding angle… This helmet was also found in a private collection of a Russian collector. This helmet has bullet holes too and it had been dug out of the ground which makes it cheaper than regular helmets but ensures its authenticity. The point is that Poles began to fake WWII helmets long ago (back in the 60s).

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view All They That Take The Sword Shall Perish With The Sword as presented by: English Russia


The Great Wall of China runs from Shanhaiguan in the east, to Lop Nur in the west, spanning 8,851.8 km (5,500.3 miles) of Northern China. It was arguably the longest running work in progress in history. Construction of the Great Wall began in the 5th century BCE, with rebuilding and maintenance efforts continuing into the 16th century CE. Today, the Great Wall of China is a must see destination for visitors to China. Many of it’s popular sections are well maintained. In some areas, tourists can climb the wall and then opt for a zip-line ride back down. The Great Wall of China is, of course, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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view Great Wall of China, China as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit



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