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Horseshoe Bend is a picturesque horseshoe-shaped turn in the Colorado River, just South of the town of Page, Arizona. Visitors can reach Horseshoe Bend by taking a short 1/2 mile (0.8 kilometers) hike off US Route 89 to an overlook 1,000 feet (405 meters) above the river. Horseshoe Bend is part of Glen Canyon, which was carved by the Colorado River over a period of 5 million years. Glen Canyon is also home to the beautiful Lake Powell. Horseshoe Bend is popular with photographers and tourists who seek the beautiful canyon scenery.

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view Horseshoe Bend, Colorado River, Arizona, USA as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


In his book The New Gypsies (Prestel), photographer Iain McKell presents his portraits of a real group of present-day nomads whose culture is built around ideals of freedom, nature, and simplicity. The movement that gave rise to this culture began in 1986, when a group of post-punk anti-Thatcher protesters headed out of London into the English countryside. McKell followed them to the West Country and watched them over the years as they became a hybrid tribe—what he calls the “new gypsies.” Also known as “horse-drawn,” they are present-day rural anarchists, living a subversive lifestyle in elaborately decorated horse-drawn caravans. These new gypsies share a desire for sustainability, a love of self-reliance and a disdain for the trappings of contemporary life.

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view The New Gypsies as presented by: Photo District News


Would you like to participate in an expedition aimed at examination of the Astrakhan region? Visual choice of an attractive spot carried out with the help of Google maps is followed by a car journey. The Big Brother Barkan is the highest in the Astrakhan region, up to 20m. How do you like the gallows? The Arabian toad-headed agama.

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view Sands of the Astrakhan Barkan as presented by: English Russia



Red, the color of human blood, symbolizes passion, fire, love, and anger. In Eastern cultures, it also connotes luck and prosperity. Red occurs throughout nature, from dying stars to dying leaves, and humans have evoked its powers for everything from politics to sports. Rich red draperies and glowing paper lanterns transform a rocky cave into a magical wedding hall in China's Hubei Province. Red is the traditional color of Chinese wedding celebrations. Kenya's Lake Magadi blushes under a bacteria bloom following a rainstorm. The extremely salty, alkali lake holds little life, but its waters are a favorite spot for wading birds. Nothing can dampen the enthusiasm of Taipei schoolchildren gathered for a celebration of Double Ten, Taiwan's national day. Double Ten remembers the October 10, 1911, revolution that ended China’s last dynasty.

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view Life in Color: Red as presented by: National Geographic


The Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition lets us see beyond the capabilities of our unaided eyes. Almost 2000 entries from 70 countries vied for recognition in the 37th annual contest, which celebrates photography through a microscope. Images two through 21 showcase the contest's winners in order, and are followed by a selection of other outstanding works. Scientists and photographers turned their attention on a wide range of subjects, both living and man-made, from lacewing larva to charged couple devices, sometimes magnifying them over 2000 times their original size. A freshwater shrimp eye and head shot with image stacking photography by Jose R. Almodovar at the Microscopy Center, Biology Department, UPR Mayaguez Campus in Mayaquez, Puerto Rico. Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried, Germany shot "Portrait of a Chrysopa sp. (green lacewing) larva" at 20x magnification using the confocal method. Using laser-triggered high-speed macrophotography, Dr. John H. Brackenbury of the University of Cambridge in Cambridge, UK captured a water droplet containing a pair of mosquito larvae.

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view Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition as presented by: Boston Big Picture


In the chill of a damp spring morning, ranchers at the Bledsoe ranch in Hugo, Colo., castrate, vaccinate and brand young calves. Bill Bledsoe holds the hot branding iron, as Dallas Loutzenhiser, left, J.D. Schier and Wil Bledsoe help hold down the calf. The ranchers’ practiced motions take just 60 to 90 seconds per animal. Branding day has unfolded this way for generations on ranches all across the West. But ranchers from Colorado to Oregon, from Montana to Texas, worry that the tradition is under threat. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced plans to rewrite its regulations so that hot-iron brands will no longer be recognized as an official form of identification for cattle sold or shipped across state lines. Instead, the USDA wants every cow to have a unique numerical ID, stamped on an inexpensive ear tag, to make it easier to track individual animals from ranch to feedlot to slaughterhouse. Here, Wil Bledsoe counts cows after they branded calves. The proposed regulation won’t bar ranchers from branding their livestock. Individual states will be free to recognize brands as official ID if they so choose. Here, a recently branded calf at Bledsoe ranch is back out in a pen. ‘When government steps in, they like to make things more complex,’ Wil Bledsoe said. ‘Branding’s the simplest, most efficient way to do it. Why change?’ Here, Wil Blesdoe heads back for lunch after a morning of branding calves.

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view Branding Calves at the Bledsoe Ranch as presented by: Wall Street Journal


Today is Memorial Day in the United States, a day set aside to remember and honor those who have died in military service. It's now been almost a decade since the start of the current war in Afghanistan, during which nearly 1,600 U.S. service members and nearly 1,000 other coalition troops have given their lives -- more than 50 in the past month alone. Tens of thousands of insurgents and civilians have also died in the struggle for control over this vast, complex, and war-weary nation. The Obama administration meanwhile appears to remain committed to begin drawing down U.S. troops in July, aiming for a full withdrawal by 2014. Gathered here are images from the conflict over the past month. This post is part of an ongoing monthly series on Afghanistan. Lydia Soren, mother of Marine Lance Cpl. Joe Jackson, cries as she holds one of the flags that draped Jackson's casket, on Wednesday, May 4, 2011, at Jackson's burial service in Yakima, Washington. Jackson, 22, of White Swan, Washington, died on April 24, while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. A member of a U.S. Marine honor guard folds a flag at the burial service for Marine Lance Cpl. Joe Jackson, Wednesday, May 4, 2011, in Yakima, Washington. Jackson, 22, of White Swan, Washington, died on April 24 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. Kiki Harris of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, visits the grave of her twin brother, Navy Seal Joshua Thomas Harris, who died serving in Afghanistan in 2008, as American flags on each headstone at Arlington National Cemetery in preparation for Memorial Day, in Arlington, Virginia, on Thursday, May 26, 2011.

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view A Memorial Day Look at Afghanistan: May 2011 as presented by: The Atlantic


Felix Baumgartner had the world in the palm of his hand yesterday. Millions show him rise up to 127.000 feet (alomst 39km) before stepping out of his capsule, saluting the world and jumping off to get back home. During his freefall he reached estimated speeds of over 700 miles per hour (1100km/h) and this makes him the first person to break the sound barrier without the aid of machinery. It was simply amazing viewing and we salute this hero who continues to push the boundaries of humankind. We’ll also be drinking a few extra cans of Red Bull, just to say thanks for sponsoring all these people with crazy ideas. Handout photo shows a crane holding the capsule from which Austrian pilot Felix Baumgartner will skydive during the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell. Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria prepares to jump from the altitude of 29455 meters during the second manned test flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell, New Mexico, USA on July 25, 2012. Pilot Felix Baumgartner of Austria celebrates after successfully completing the final manned flight for Red Bull Stratos in Roswell.

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view Felix Baumgartner: Freefall From The Edge Of Space as presented by: Totally Cool Pix



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