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Siberian Husky and Alaskan Malamute are two of the breeds of dogs, belonging to Spitz group, classified section of the northern sled dogs. Pierwsza wywodzi sie z rejonu Kolymy w pólnocnej Syberii. The first stems from the Kolyma region in northern Siberia. Hodowana tam przez pionierów w hodowli psów zaprzegowych – Czukczów oraz Kamczadalów, Koriaków i Jukagirów. Bred there by the pioneers in breeding sled dogs - and Chukchi Kamczadalów, Koriaków and Jukagirów. Druga, z wyzyn zachodniej Alaski (nazwa pochodzi od plemienia Mahlemiute) gdzie rodzime psy prawdopodobnie byly krzyzowane z wiekszymi psami osadników przybylych w czasie “goraczki zlota”. Second, from the highlands of western Alaska (named after the tribe Mahlemiute) where native dogs were probably crossed with larger dogs settlers arrived during the gold rush. Obie rasy maja opinie przyjacielskich wobec ludzi. Both breeds have a reputation for friendly towards people. Sa psami przystosowanymi do niskich temperatur i ciaglej pracy, potrzebuja odpowiedniego zajecia (np. zawodów, biegania przy rowerze lub regularnych bardzo dlugich spacerów). Dogs are suitable for low temperature and continuous operation, they need appropriate activities (eg competitions, cycling or jogging on a regular long walks.) Nie znosza samotnosci i bezczynnosci. Can not stand the loneliness and inactivity. Siberian Husky kennel from Rovaniemi. Team prepares to take off in the 27th wyscigu Aviemore Husky Sled Dog Rally. race Aviemore Husky Sled Dog Rally.

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In his book The New Gypsies (Prestel), photographer Iain McKell presents his portraits of a real group of present-day nomads whose culture is built around ideals of freedom, nature, and simplicity. The movement that gave rise to this culture began in 1986, when a group of post-punk anti-Thatcher protesters headed out of London into the English countryside. McKell followed them to the West Country and watched them over the years as they became a hybrid tribe—what he calls the “new gypsies.” Also known as “horse-drawn,” they are present-day rural anarchists, living a subversive lifestyle in elaborately decorated horse-drawn caravans. These new gypsies share a desire for sustainability, a love of self-reliance and a disdain for the trappings of contemporary life.

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This was a weekend of the Sun and Moon -- a coincidence of the summer solstice and the "Supermoon". Friday was the summer solstice (in the northern hemisphere), welcomed by humans for thousands of years as the longest day of the year. In ancient times, people celebrated this day as the center point of summer. Some still observe the solstice with ceremonies and prayers, gathering on mountaintops or at spiritual landmarks. Over the weekend, skywatchers around the world were also treated to views of the so-called Supermoon, the largest full moon of the year. On Sunday, the moon approached within 357,000 km (222,000 mi) of Earth, in what is called a perigee-syzygy of the Earth-Moon-Sun system (perigee: closest point of an elliptical orbit; syzygy: straight line made of three bodies in a gravitational system). Photographers across the globe set out to capture both events, and collected here are 24 images of our two most-visible celestial neighbors. The Supermoon sets behind the Statue of Liberty, Sunday, June 23, 2013, in New York. The larger than normal moon called the "Supermoon" happens only once this year as the moon on its elliptical orbit is at its closest point to earth and is 13.5 percent larger than usual. The largest full moon of 2013, a "supermoon" scientifically known as a "perigee moon", rises over the Tien Shan mountains and the monument to 18th century military commander Nauryzbai Batyr near the town of Kaskelen, some 23 km (14 mi) west of Almaty, Kazakhstan, on June 23, 2013. The Supermoon, behind the Marina district towers in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on June 23, 2013.

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view The Solstice and the Supermoon as presented by: The Atlantic



It's now been three weeks since the "Occupy Wall Street" protests began in New York City's Financial District, and the movement has grown, spreading to other cities in the U.S. Protesters have organized marches, rallies, and "occupations" from Boston to Boise, Los Angeles to New Orleans, Seattle to Tampa. Using social media, handmade signs, and their voices, they are voicing anger at financial and social inequality and protesting the influence of corporate money in politics. Seattle police recently arrested 25 protesters camping out in Westlake Park, following on the heels of 700 arrests on New York's Brooklyn Bridge last week. Collected here are a some of the scenes from these protests across the U.S. over the past week, as the movement moves forward with no signs of slowing. Protestors march through downtown Boise, Idaho, Wednesday October 5, 2011. Activists have been showing solidarity with movement in many cities, including Occupy Boise. More than 100 people withstood an afternoon downpour in Idaho's capital to protest. Police arrest a protester on New York's Brooklyn Bridge during Saturday's march by Occupy Wall Street on October 1, 2011. Protesters speaking out against corporate greed and other grievances attempted to walk over the bridge from Manhattan, resulting in the arrest of more than 700 during a tense confrontation with police. The majority of those arrested were given citations for disorderly conduct and were released, police said. A woman who identified herself as Janelle K. holds up a sign during an "Occupy Las Vegas" demonstration on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, on October 6, 2011.

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According to the German timber industry association, Germans are expected to purchase about 29 million Christmas trees this season. Christmas is the most important holiday in Central Europe and many retailers depend on it for as much as half of their annual sales. Shoppers carry their trees at a Christmas tree farm on December 12, 2010 in Mellensee near Berlin, Germany. A mother and her children search for a tree at a Christmas tree farm on December 12, 2010 in Mellensee. Santa Claus walks with kids through a Christmas tree farm.

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view The Hunt for Christmas Trees in Germany as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Heading to camp, cooling off, stormy afternoons, and visiting the ice cream vendor must mean a change of seasons. The northern hemisphere a week ago marked the summer solstice, the day with the most sunlight of the year and the official kickoff for summer. A girl takes a cold shower in order to refresh herself at Ada Ciganlija lake in Belgrade, Serbia, on June 20. The Balkan region is experiencing a heat wave, with temperatures rising as high as 37 degrees Celsius (99 Fahrenheit). A lightning storm rolls across the sky on June 17 in Odessa, Texas. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which collects its information at the Odessa-Schlemeyer Field, there will be chances of thunderstorms all day Tuesday then returns to sunny skies with the temperature in the mid to high 90s. A boy jumps into the water of a public swimming pool in Hanover, central Germany, on June 17. Meteorologists forecast temperatures up to 30 degrees Celsius and even more for wide parts of the country.

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view Summer Scenes 2013 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Torrential downpours from a faded tropical storm inundated the Northeast on Friday, forcing evacuations, toppling trees, cutting power to thousands and washing out roads during a snarled morning commute. Water pooled so deeply in a Philadelphia suburb that a car literally floated on top of another car. Hard rain began falling in Boston early Friday afternoon as the city braced for the sustained rains that have plagued the Eastern Seaboard over the last two days. The deluge was blamed for five deaths in North Carolina on Thursday and a sixth in Pennsylvania on Friday - a woman who apparently drove her car into a rain-swollen creek before daybreak. The storm soaked a great swath of the Northeast by the Friday morning commute, including New York City and Philadelphia. Flights coming into LaGuardia Airport in New York City were delayed three hours and traffic coming into Manhattan was delayed by up to an hour under a pounding rain. Amel Sincere empties out her car after receded floodwaters submerged the parking lot of the Waterford Apartments in Havertown, Pa. A tractor trailer gets stuck along Virginia Beach Boulevard in Norfolk, Va. West Albany firefighters check on residents of a flooded house in Colonie, N.Y.

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view Storm Inundates The Northeast U.S. as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Their homelands are torn by war, economic distress, political strife, or environmental collapse. They choose to leave, or have no choice. They're called migrants, refugees, or internally displaced people. The labels are inadequate as often circumstances could allow all three descriptions, or some combination of them. Once in their new countries, they face difficult transitions, discrimination, or outright hostility. Host countries are burdened with the economic and political repercussions of the arrivals, while home nations are sometimes saddled with a "brain drain" of their most important human resources. Immigration is a hot-button issue in the American presidential race, and a wave of new arrivals from Libya to Italy has left the European Union struggling with decisions over the Schengen policy of borderless travel between member nations. Gathered here are images of some of the estimated 214 million people worldwide in the process of redefining what "home" means to them. Tunisian would-be immigrants who were evacuated from the Italian island of Lampedusa to a reception center in Manduria, jump over a fence to escape from the camp on April 1. The Italian government has prepared a plan to accommodate 10,000 migrants on a temporary basis, before repatriating them to Tunisia. Rescuers help people in the sea after a boat carrying some 250 migrants crashed into rocks as they tried to enter the port of Pantelleria, an island off the southern coast of Italy, on April 13. Italy is struggling to cope with a mass influx of immigrants from north Africa, many of whom risk their lives by sailing across the often stormy Meditteranean in makeshift vessels. Syrian soldiers prepare to hand over an elderly Syrian woman to Lebanese army troops as she was found trying to cross the border into northern Lebanon on foot on the Syrian side of the border village of Arida on May 19. The family of the woman had already fled their homes for fear of fresh violence as a result of anti-regime protests in their country, leaving her behind.

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