Gallery Gate

Every year, the Festival of San Fermin attracts thousands of visitors to Pamplona, Spain. Over the course of nine days, the festival hosts many bullfights, a carnival, fireworks, and of course, the encierro, or "running of the bulls." Held since 1591, San Fermin remains a popular, if also dangerous and controversial event: Several people have been gored already this year, and the festival continues until July 14th. Collected below are some scenes from the first few days of this 2011's Festival of San Fermin. Chilean Alonso Ceardi poses with a picture that shows when he was severely gored during the running of the bulls at the 2010 San Fermin Festival in Pamplona. Ceardi nearly died from the goring, but said he would run again at this year's festival. Mexican bullfighter Arturo Saldivar performs during a bullfight at the San Fermin Festival, on Thursday, July 7. A Torrestrella ranch fighting bull is seen during a bullfight at the San Fermin Festival in Pamplona, Spain.

Share/Bookmark

view The Running of The Bulls as presented by: The Atlantic


Most animals, humans included, have bodily rhythms governed by the sun. But for nocturnal critters it's the moon that matters, affecting everything from lovemaking to lion attacks. Tungara frogs (Engystomops pustulosus), which live throughout Central and South America, call and mate at night. They usually prefer to be out and about when it's really dark, since illumination increases their risk of getting eaten. Folklore says that coyotes howl at the full moon, but it turns out they're more particular than that. Coyotes (Canis latrans) use three different types of howls: lone, group and group-yip howling. For the iconic lone howl, the phase of the moon makes no difference. Hundreds of species of coral spawn once a year in a mass synchronized event, releasing millions of eggs and countless numbers of sperm into the water a few nights after a full moon. The timing of spawning varies from species to species and by location. For instance, in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, more than 100 of the 400-plus species of corals spawn simultaneously over the course of a few nights during spring or early summer.

Share/Bookmark

view 7 Animals That Get Busy in the Moonlight as presented by: Discover Magazine


An Amtrak train bound for New York City derailed in Philadelphia on Tuesday night, leaving at least six people dead and more than a hundred injured, officials said. The train appeared to go off the tracks while going into a turn about 9:30 p.m., according to the Associated Press, one of whose own staff members happened to be on board.

Share/Bookmark

view Amtrak Train Derails in Philadelphia as presented by: ABC News



Some 100,000 minority Uzbeks fleeing a purge by mobs of Kyrgyz massed at the border Monday, an Uzbek leader said, as the deadliest ethnic violence to hit this Central Asian nation in decades left a major city smoldering. With fires raging in the southern city of Osh for a fourth day Monday, the official death toll of 124 killed and nearly 1,500 injured from the clashes that began Thursday appeared way too low. An Uzbek community leader claimed at least 200 Uzbeks alone had already been buried, and the Red Cross said its delegates saw about 100 bodies being buried in just one cemetery. The United States, Russia and the United Nations worked on humanitarian aid airlifts while neighboring Uzbekistan hastily set up camps to handle the flood of hungry, frightened refugees. Most were women, children and the elderly, many of whom Uzbekistan said had gunshot wounds. An Ethnic Uzbek women is seen at the border between Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistsan outside Yorkishlok. Ethnic Uzbeks gather near the Kyrgyz-Uzbek border in southern Kyrgyzstan, on Saturday, June 12, 2010, trying to seek refuge in Uzbekistan from mobs of Kyrgyz men attacking the minority Uzbek community. Members of ethnic Uzbek community armed with sticks and and hunting rifles to protect their lives and property guard an road to a Uzbek residence near Osh.

Share/Bookmark

view Uzbeks flee ethnic clashes in Kyrgyzstan as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Thames Town is the English name for a new town in Songjiang, about 30 km from central Shanghai, China and situated on the Yangtze River. It is named after the River Thames in England, the United Kingdom. The architecture both imitates and is influenced by classic English market town styles. There are cobbled streets, Victorian terraces, corner shops - empty as in an abandoned film set. Some of the architecture has been directly copied from buildings found in England, including the church (copied from one in Clifton, Bristol) and a pub and fish and chip shop (copied from buildings in Lyme Regis, Dorset). The picturesque church and main square makes an idyllic backdrop for many Chinese Wedding photos. Chinese newlyweds pose for wedding photographs in Thames Town on November 19, 2010 in Songjiang, China. Chinese wedding couples gather daily to have their wedding portraits taken in the themed Chinese town. "Thames Town" is the English name for a newly built town in Songjiang, 35 km from central Shanghai, China and situated on the Yangtze River. It is named after the River Thames in England. The architecture both imitates and is influenced by classic English market town styles. Chinese newlyweds pose for wedding photographs in front of the Thames Town Church in Thames Town on November 19, 2010 in Songjiang, China. An assistant leans over to make final touches as Chinese newlyweds pose for photographs during a photo session in Thames Town.

Share/Bookmark

view Newlyweds in Thames Town, China as presented by: Sacramento Bee


These remarkable photographs came to our attention after we published several postcards from a new book on the atomic age in a recent weekend edition, including one that featured a colorized version the atomic bomb test of shot Charlie that you see here. Mr. Verdooner sent us these images after seeing the vintage postcards published in the WSJ newspaper. We were struck by the beauty of the images, and were delighted when he agreed to be interviewed about his experience shooting them. Sergeant Marcel Verdooner was 24 years old on April 22, 1952, when he witnessed an atomic bomb detonation reportedly 10 times more powerful than the one that hit Hiroshima. He was a member of the 301st Signal Photographic Company detachment of 21 photographers assigned to Yucca Flats, six of whom are still living today. Mr. Verdooner describes what he saw as shot Charlie was dropped, in his position about ten miles from ground zero: “The first photo here was taken after the initial fireball was burned out and the stem of the mushroom started to develop from the sand on surface of the desert. The colors in the fireball were indescribably beautiful. This image shows the shock wave traveling across the desert. After I took this photo I had to kneel down, turn my back to the shock wave and brace myself. The fireball was followed by the forming and rising of the mushroom cloud in the second photo. The vacuum created by the fireball sucked material inwards, which creates the mushroom shape.” Shot Charlie was the first public and televised atomic bomb test in the US.

Share/Bookmark

view The View from Ground Zero as presented by: Wall Street Journal


At first glimpse these pictures may look like nothing out of the ordinary - appearing to just show an ordinary leaf or a branch of a tree. But on closer inspection you can spot some of nature's true masters of disguise playing a killer game of hide and seek. From a katydid disguised as a leaf to a tiny Pygmy Seahorse camouflaged in sea fan in Papua New Guinea, these images showcase the creatures who can quite literally blend into the background. Illusionist: A leaf-mimic katydid - also known as a bush-cricket - camouflaged to look like a dead leaf to hide itself from predators. Keeping a keen eye: John Cancalosi, who took this snap of a tiny red crab camouflaged on a Sea Fan in Papua New Guinea, said even he sometimes struggles to spot the creatures he photographs.

Share/Bookmark

view Masters Of Disguise Blend Into The Background To Survive Kill-or-be-killed World as presented by: Daily Mail Online


Several explosions erupted near the finish line of the Boston Marathon today, in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. Police are reporting 2 deaths and at least 23 hurt, as authorities begin their investigation. A Boston police officer clears Boylston Street following an explosion at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon in Boston, Monday, April 15, 2013. Two explosions shattered the euphoria at the finish line on Monday, sending authorities out on the course to carry off the injured while the stragglers were rerouted away from the smoking site of the blasts. A man is loaded into an ambulance after he was injured by one of two bombs exploded during the 117th Boston Marathon near Copley Square. Medical workers aid injured people at the finish line of the 2013 Boston Marathon following an explosion in Boston.

Share/Bookmark

view Photos of the Boston Marathon Bombing as presented by: The Atlantic



view our privacy policy & terms of service