Gallery Gate

The 65th anniversary event at the site of the world’s first A-bomb attack echoed with the choirs of schoolchildren and the solemn ringing of bells Friday as Hiroshima marked the occasion. At 8:15 a.m. – the time the bomb dropped, incinerating most of the city – a moment of silence was observed. On Aug. 6, 1945, during World War II, the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. About 140,000 people were killed or died within months when the American B-29 “Enola Gay” bombed Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. Three days later, about 80,000 people died after the United States also bombed Nagasaki. Japan surrendered on Aug. 15, ending World War II. To this day, the bombings remain the only time nuclear weapons have been unleashed. The United States decided to drop the bombs because Washington believed it would hasten the end of the war and avert the need to wage prolonged and bloody land battles on Japan’s main island. That concern was heightened by Japan’s desperate efforts to control outlying islands such as Iwo Jima and Okinawa as the Allies closed in. A giant column of smoke rises more than 60,000 feet into the air, after the second atomic bomb ever used in warfare explodes over the Japanese port town of Nagasaki, on August 9, 1945. Dropped by the U.S. Army Air Forces B-29 plane "Bockscar," the bomb killed more than 70,000 people instantly, with ten thousands dying later from effects of the radioactive fallout. An unidentified young boy carries his burned brother on his back Aug. 10, 1945 in Nagasaki, Japan. This photographs was not released to the public by the Japanese military but was disseminated to the world press by the United Nations after the war. Arrow marks the spot where the A-bomb struck at Nagasaki, Japan, August 10, 1945. Much of the bombed area is still desolate, the trees on the hills in the background remained charred and dwarfed from the blast and little reconstruction, except of wooden shacks as homes, has taken place.

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view On War: The dropping of the Atomic Bomb, 65 years later as presented by: Denver Post


Every five years, National Trust rangers carry out a puffin census on the Farne Islands, off the northeast coast of England. The beautiful birds return to their breeding grounds on the islands, which offer excellent sources of food, few ground predators, and good protection for nesting. This count carries particular significance because the last survey in 2008, recording 36,500 pairs, indicated that numbers had fallen by a third from the 2003 census. There is also fear that the extreme weather in the past year could affect the numbers. In March, thousands of birds washed up dead due to severely cold winds, and last summer, many of the birds were flooded out of their homes. Rangers are now faced with the daunting task of counting every burrow-nesting bird, which involves reaching down to each of the underground nests to see if it is occupied. The results will be ready in July.

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view Puffin Census on the Farne Islands as presented by: Boston Big Picture


The contestants will spend the next 2 weeks appearing at events and preparing to compete in the 2011 Miss Universe Competition on 12 September 2011 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

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view Miss Universe 2011 as presented by: GigaPica



Local farmer Shu Mansheng starts the engines of his self-designed and homemade flying device before a test flight in front of his house in Dashu village on the outskirts of Wuhan, Hubei province September 21, 2011. The round steel flying device, which cost more than 20,000 yuan ($3,135), is the fifth model made by Shu, a junior middle school graduate. It measures around 5.5 meters (18 feet) in diameter, and is powered by eight motorcycle engines. Shu managed to hover for 10 seconds at about 1 metre (3.3 feet) above ground during a recent test flight.

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view Awesome Gentleman Builds Homemade Flying Contraption Powered By Eight Motorcycle Engines as presented by: Boing Boing


Ivory Coast has two governments, one clinging to power while the international community insists that it must go, the other barricaded inside a hotel protected by barbed wire and the blue helmets of a UN peacekeeping force. Laurent Gbagbo's term in office expired five years ago, and the long-delayed election appeared to have ousted him from power. He has refused to leave. His opponent, Alassane Ouattara, has the support of world leaders, but not of Ivory Coast's military. And so the election stalemate continues, international sanctions slow the economy, and post-election violence has claimed the lives of over 200 people. Collected here are photographs of the campaign, the vote, post-election violence, and daily life in Ivory Coast, a West African nation of 21 million. Supporters of incumbent President Laurent Gbagbo raise their hands in a show of support at a rally in the Yopougon district of Abidjan, Ivory Coast. A supporter of incumbent President Laurent Gbagbo, wearing body paint reading "Peace," reacts during an event at the Palace of Culture in Abidjan. Voters wait in line outside a polling station to cast their ballots in the first round of presidential elections.

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view Ivory Coast's Election Stalemate as presented by: Boston Big Picture


For years now, governments around the world have been sinking large pieces of outdated or damaged equipment into the ocean, turning them into artificial reefs. Subway cars, naval ships, tanks and more rest on the sea floor, making homes for sea life and attracting divers. Artists have been busy as well, erecting underwater sculptures and memorials. Collected here are images from the past few years of some of these man-made reefs, both big and small. 25 retired tanks from the Thai military are loaded on a ship at Bangkok port, Thailand, on Friday, July 30, 2010. The tanks will be dumped into the Gulf of Thailand to serve as artificial reefs and as habitat for marine animals. The Spiegel Grove begins to roll, June 10, 2002, in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary off Key Largo. The ship sunk upside-down prematurely May 17 and salvage crews worked for three weeks to get ready for June 10 rollover. The decommissioned aircraft carrier Oriskany is sunk off the coast of Pensacola, Florida, on Wednesday, May 17, 2006, to form an artificial reef. The 888-foot ship took about 37 minutes to sink below the surface.

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view Artificial Reefs Around the World as presented by: The Atlantic


Last Sunday, France celebrated Bastille Day, commemorating the start of the French Revolution in 1789 -- the end of monarchy and the beginning of modern France. Reuters photographers Charles Platiau and Gonzalo Fuentes took to the skies above Paris for the occasion, capturing images of the capital city, its unique blend of historic and modern architecture, and some of its residents and visitors enjoying the sunny day. The Arc de Triomphe at the center of the Place Charles de Gaulle, also known as the "Place de l'Etoile." The Invalides and the Arc de Triomphe, during the evening of Bastille Day. The Eiffel Tower, illuminated during the traditional Bastille Day fireworks display in Paris, on July 14, 2013.

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view Paris From Above as presented by: The Atlantic


Three NATO troops were killed Friday in Afghanistan in a surge of attacks that raised the death toll to 17 in three days for international troops in the country. One service member died Friday in an insurgent attack in the east and another was killed by a roadside bomb in southern Afghanistan, an alliance statement said. It did not give nationalities or exact locations of the attacks. On Thursday, eight NATO troops were killed in a spate of attacks, including four separate roadside bombings. It has been the deadliest year for international forces in the nine-year Afghan conflict. Troop numbers have been ramped up to turn the screws on insurgents and casualties have mounted. The escalating toll -- more than 2,020 NATO deaths since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion -- has shaken the commitment of many alliance countries, with calls growing to start drawing down forces quickly. Getty Images photographer Scott Olson is with the Marines of India Battery, 3rd Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment who are responsible for securing the area near the Kajaki Dam on the Helmand River. .S. Marines Pfc. Logan Harty (L) of Dixon, CA and LCpl. Jose Dehoyos from Fort Worth, TX attached to India Battery, 3rd Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment fire on an enemy position during a firefight near Forward Operating Base (FOB) Zeebrugge on October 11, 2010 in Kajaki, Afghanistan. Marine Cpl. Jonathan Eckert of Oak Lawn, IL attached to India Battery, 3rd Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment shows villagers his iPod during a patrol near Forward Operating Base (FOB) Zeebrugge on October 13, 2010 in Kajaki, Afghanistan. US. Marine Cpl. Sean Shea of Boston, MA gives himself a haircut at Forward Operating Base (FOB) Zeebrugge on October 12, 2010 in Kajaki, Afghanistan. Shea is part of India Battery, 3rd Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment, which is responsible for securing the area around the Kajaki Dam.

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view The Marines of India Battery as presented by: Sacramento Bee



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