Gallery Gate

In the southwestern part of Utah in the United States lies a wondrous work of erosion – Bryce Canyon. Despite its name, Bryce Canyon is an eroded natural amphitheater rather than a canyon. The most notable features of Bryce Canyon are its “hoodoos”, or geological structures formed by harsh weather erosion caused by wind, ice and water. One of the hoodoos is called Thor’s Hammer because its shape resembles that of a hammer. Visitors to Bryce Canyon can enjoy a scenic drive to 13 viewpoints overlooking the canyon. Tourists can also enjoy hiking, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing. Bryce Canyon is close to both Zion National Park and the Grand Canyon, as well as the town of Kanab, Utah, where many visitors to the area choose to find accommodation. Lodging can also be found in Bryce Canyon National Park’s two campgrounds or its lodge.

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Kent Williams, owner of New Fishall Bait Company, looks into the mouth of a 1,323.5-pound Mako shark at the company's headquarters in Gardena, Calif., on Wednesday, June 5, 2013. Jason Johnston of Texas caught the potentially record-setting 1,323-pound shark off Huntington Beach on Monday after a 2 1/2-hour battle, the Orange County Register reported. "I've hunted lions and brown bears, but I've never experienced anything like this," said Jason Johnston of Texas, who caught the 1,323-pound shark off Huntington Beach on Monday after a 2 1/2-hour battle, "It felt like I had a one-ton diesel truck at the end of the line, and it wasn't budging." If the catch is confirmed and meets conditions, it would exceed the 1,221-pound record mako catch made in July 2001 off the coast of Chatham, Mass., said Jack Vitek, world records coordinator for the Florida-based International Game Fish Association. It takes about two months for the association to verify domestic catches

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A vast wildfire, measuring half the size of the state of Rhode Island and described as the second worst fire in Arizona history, continues to surge across eastern Arizona. The fire has jumped past firefighter's containment lines to reach the edges of residential areas, prompting more evacuation orders. Winds carrying burning embers continue to ignite smaller fires, causing new concerns about the prospect of extinguishing the 13-day-old fire. The Wallow Fire has destroyed approximately 337,000 acres and threatens main electrical lines that supply power as far away as west Texas. Thousands have evacuated. Fire lights up a hillside south of State Route 260 as building lights shine in the foreground, June 6, 2011. Police officers direct traffic as local residents evacuate from the Wallow Wildfire in Springerville, June 7, 2011.

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Surrounding the small town of Dadaab, Kenya, is one of the oldest and largest refugee camps in the world, now home more than 332,000 people, mainly from Somalia. (It was originally designed to house just 90,000.) The complex of camps was first established as a temporary solution more than 20 years ago by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR), after Somalia descended into a civil war that continues to this day. According to UN estimates, more than 31,000 additional Somalis have arrived in the camps this year alone, as drought and continuing violence between Somali Government forces and Al-Shabaab militants have forced them to seek long-term refuge. To deal with overcrowding, sanitation, and health problems, UNHCR officials were looking to expand the complex by opening a fourth camp, but Kenyan authorities have frozen the plan due to security concerns. These photos offer a view into life in Dadaab. A Somali refugee girl bites her fingers at Ifo camp near Dadaab, northeastern Kenya, January 6, 2007. A Somali refugee girl covers her face at Dagahaley camp in Dadaab in Kenya's northeastern province. U.N. relief workers retrieve relief supplies after they were air-dropped from a U.S. military plane at Dadaab refugee complex in northeastern Kenya.

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The attacks of September 11th, 2001 came as a huge surprise, shocking the world and immediately dominating the news around the world. Ten years later, the reverberations from that shock and the varying reactions to it continue to affect nearly everyone in ways large and small. While most people remember where they were on that day, it can be difficult to recall what else was happening in the days just before. I thought it would be interesting to go through the newswires and find photos of events taking place around the world during the week of September 3 to September 10, 2001. Some of the photos are directly related to the upcoming attacks, or the fallout that resulted, many have nothing at all to do with the attacks, but simply show glimpses of what was happening at that time. Gathered here is a time capsule of images taken during this week of September, one decade ago, before everything changed. Crowds fill Arthur Ashe Stadium prior to the men's final at the U.S. Open Tennis Championship in New York, on September 9, 2001. A satellite image of the Pentagon Building near Washington, D.C., taken on September 7, 2001 by the IKONOS satellite. Four days later, American Airlines Flight 77 would be crashed into the western wall (top right in this photo), killing 189 aboard the flight and on the ground. A view of the New York City skyline with the World Trade Center at sunset taken from the US Open at the UATA National Tennis Center in Flushing, New York, on September 5, 2001.

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A tornado as much as a mile wide with winds up to 200 mph roared through the Oklahoma City suburbs Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods, setting buildings on fire and landing a direct blow on an elementary school. Rescuers lift an injured survivor from the rubble a structure in the aftermath of the huge tornado that struck Moore, Okla., on Monday. A U.S. flag lies across an overturned car in the aftermath of a tornado in Moore, Oklahoma.

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In his ‘Vertical Horizon’ project, 26-year-old French graphic artist and photographer Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze captures Hong Kong’s soaring heights. The project, now a book, comprises 80 photos taken in 2012. A dozen of Mr. Jacquet-Lagrèze’s photos are currently on display in Hong Kong’s Tsim Sha Tsui district as part of Le French May cultural festival. Hong Kong is famed for its skyline, but graphic artist and photographer Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze takes viewers on a different visual journey: looking up.

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Outside a bunker on March 20, 2010 in Marjah, Helmand province, southern Afghanistan Agence France-Presse photographer Mauricio Lima created a series of portraits illustrating the tattoos of the members of the 3rd Battalion, 6th Marines. Many United States Marines sport several tattoos, commonly to tell the story of their lives as soldiers, to vanquish their fears, honor their comrades or to proclaim their love. 3rd Battalion, 6th Marines, Sergeant Paul Williams, 20, of Fostoria, Ohio, poses to show his tattoos, including two bull dogs (or "Devil Dogs", a nickname used by US Marines to address each other which was allegedly given to them by the Germans in the First World War), and lyrics from the Dire Straits song Brothers in Arms "Through these fields of destruction / baptisms of fire / I've witnessed all your suffering / as the battle raged higher", for a portrait at the entrance to a bunker at a base in Marjah, Helmand province, southern Afghanistan, on March 20, 2010.

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