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In some parts of the northern hemisphere, the hottest days of summer have already set records this year, in others, the highest temperatures are yet to come. The sunshine brings people outdoors, to cool off at the beach, on a high mountain peak, or in a park fountain. Gathered here are a handful of images of Summer 2013, from Alaska to Ukraine, Egypt, Death Valley, and more. Randy Kern (left) and John Rice dress as Star Wars characters for their own annual snapshot tradition near an unofficial thermometer at Furnace Creek Visitors Center reading of 131 degrees, believed by officials to be about three degree on the high side, as a heat wave spreads across the American West on June 30, 2013 in Death Valley National Park, California. Weather forecasters predicted high temperatures could reach 130 degrees in Death Valley, breaking the hottest-ever temperature for June of 128 degrees, set on June 29, 1994. It is also just four degrees shy of breaking the all-time world record of 134 degrees which occurred here 100 years ago. On a hot summer day, a girl stands surrounded by the jets of a fountain on the South Bank in central London. A hiker makes his way along the Mount Roberts Trail above Juneau, Alaska.

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view Hot Summer Days as presented by: The Atlantic


Yemen's President Ali Abdullah Saleh was reportedly wounded today in a rocket attack on his compound in Sanaa. Yemeni government troops have been engaged in street fights with tribal groups loyal to Sheikh Sadeq al-Ahmar for nearly two weeks now, after al-Ahmar sided with thousands of Yemeni protesters who have been peacefully demonstrating and calling for President Saleh's ouster for nearly four months now. Government forces have opened fire on protesters many times over those months, killing and wounding dozens. Adding further complications, Islamist militants, possibly tied to Al Qaeda, are now taking advantage of the chaos and instability, and have seized control of several towns in along Yemen's south coast. Collected here are images from the past several weeks of troubled Yemen, a country that may soon be mired in a civil war. An anti-government protester, center, wearing a red scarf, looks up while praying with other women during a demonstration demanding the resignation of President Saleh, in Sanaa, Yemen. Anti-government protesters attend a demonstration demanding the resignation of President Saleh, in Sanaa, Yemen. An army soldier keeps watch over a rally to demand the ouster of President Saleh in Sanaa, on June 3, 2011.

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view Crisis in Yemen as presented by: The Atlantic


In his new book, Serpentine, photographer Mark Laita tackles the tricky photographic subject of snakes. Over the course of the last decade and a half he has captured these colorful, charismatic and sometimes creepy animals. DISCOVER's Breanna Draxler spoke with Laita about the project, and here we feature some of the most striking images and the stories behind them. "I’m not a specialist in snakes," Laita says. "I just think they’re beautiful." Controversy surrounds the taxonomy of the snake pictured here, and very little is known about this species in particular. But the genus is known to feed on frogs, lizards and small mammals.

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view Snakes' Glamour Shots Show Off Their Curves as presented by: Discover Magazine



A collection of images released by NASA gives us a look from above and beyond earth. Amazing technology allows us to view our world in ways we could never imagine. ASA's DHC-3 Otter plane flies in Operation IceBridge-Alaska surveys of mountain glaciers in Alaska in this image released on September 18. Over the past few decades, average global temperatures have been on the rise, and this warming is happening two to three times faster in the Arctic. As the region's summer comes to a close, NASA is hard at work studying how rising temperatures are affecting the Arctic. The sun emitted a significant solar flare, peaking at 1:48 p.m. EDT on Sept. 10. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground. However -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.At about 10:45 p.m. Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) on September 14, Hurricane Odile made landfall as a Category 3 storm near Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. According to the U.S. National Hurricane Center, Odile arrived with wind speeds of 110 knots (204 kilometers or 127 miles per hour). The storm tied Olivia (1967) as the strongest hurricane to make landfall in the state of Baja California Sur in the satellite era.

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view Images from NASA as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Late on the night of April 20th, 50 miles from the shore of Louisiana, a fire broke out aboard the Transocean Deepwater Horizon oil rig under lease by BP, with 126 individuals on board. After a massive explosion, all but 11 of the crew managed to escape as the rig was consumed by fire, later collapsing and sinking into the Gulf. Safeguards set in place to automatically cap the oil well in case of catastrophe did not work as expected, and now an estimated 5,000 barrels (over 200,000 gallons) of crude oil is pouring into the Gulf of Mexico every day - and could possibly continue to do so for months as complicated efforts are made to stop the leak. Collected here are several recent photos of the developing situation along Louisiana's Gulf Shore - one with the potential to eclipse the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in scope and damage. Firefighting boats spray seawater onto the burning Deepwater Horizon oil rig on April 21, 2010. The oil platform burned for 36 hours after a massive explosion, then later sank into the Gulf of Mexico. A Louisiana Heron rests in the fragile wetlands near the town of Venice, in the path of the oil spill that is creeping towards the coast of Louisiana. Workers move containment booms to a smaller vessel on the Mississippi River at Port Eads, Louisiana on Thursday, April 29, 2010. A huge effort is underway to help mitigate the effects of an oil spill caused by the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig.

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view Oil Spill Approaches Louisiana coast as presented by: Boston Big Picture


A Mercedes hung from the seventh-floor parking garage at the Bank of America building in Tulsa, Okla., on Thursday. The car backed through the wall after the driver’s foot got stuck on the accelerator. Debris rained down to a parking lot below, damaging several cars, but no injuries were reported. Dr. Jimmy Shern and assistant Dianna Yang extracted a tooth from Matthew Hucko during the Remote Area Medical clinic at the Los Angeles sports arena Tuesday. The nonprofit Remote Area Medical clinic has volunteer doctors, dentists, optometrists, nurses and support staff treating uninsured and underinsured people in California. sailors of the sunken navy ship Cheonan carried portraits of deceased sailors during the funeral ceremony in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, on Thursday. At least 40 bodies were found and six sailors are still missing after a South Korean warship sank in mysterious circumstances last month near North Korean waters.

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view Pictures of the Week: April 25 - April 30 as presented by: Wall Street Journal


The latest research suggests troops handle battlefield stress better, and avoid post-war problems more often, when they heal among their comrades. On a base in Afghanistan, Marines on the front lines help a comrade cope with his best friend’s death. A portrait of Cpl. Chad Wade hangs in 1st Platoon’s command post at Patrol Base Hernandez . Cpl. Wade was killed in December by a bomb buried on the path he was patrolling. The rest of the platoon rallied around Lance Cpl. Voie, just the kind of front-line, buddy-to-buddy intervention the Marine Corps is trying to institutionalize to avoid post-traumatic stress disorder among the troops. Here, 1st Squad leader Sgt. Albert Tippett, left, and Lance Cpl. Voie smoke and hang out with other Marines in the squad’s hooch. A Marine from 2nd Battalion raises the flag at Patrol Base Hernandez. The battalion was one of three in Afghanistan to have gone through the new combat-stress training before shipping out from the U.S.

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view Marines Rally Around Friend as presented by: Wall Street Journal


Thousands of thrill-seekers dashed ahead of six fighting bulls in the streets of the northern Spanish city of Pamplona on Thursday in a fast first running of the bulls in this year's San Fermin festival. No one was gored, but four people were taken to Navarre Hospital with injuries -- one with fractured ribs -- sustained during a sprint where the six guiding steers stole the show from the charging bulls from the Torrestrella ranch, which is famed for producing dangerous bulls. Revelers take part in the "Chupinazo," the official opening of the 2011 San Fermin festival, Wednesday, July 6, 2011 in Pamplona, Spain. Revelers hold up traditional red neckties as tens of thousands of people pack Pamplona's main square in Pamplona, Spain, Wednesday July 6, 2011 to celebrate the start of Spain's most famous bull-running festival with the annual launch of the "Chupinazo" rocket. Revelers are surprised by an angry leading ox, used to drive the fighting bulls during the running of the bulls at the San Fermin festival on Thursday, July 7, 2011.

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view Clean Start to Pamplona's Running of the Bulls as presented by: Sacramento Bee



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