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It’s a do-over this weekend at Coachella, where about 190 acts will return for the second, and final, weekend of the annual festival. Whether you’re headed to Indio, recovering from last weekend’s festival and looking for some couch viewing, or simply excited to join in from home, Framework presents a selection of the best imagery by the visual journalists of the Los Angeles Times throughout the final three days and nights at the iconic desert music event. Be sure to see our Best of Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival 2013 | Weekend one photo gallery, Luis Sinco’s take on covering the festival, our Faces of Coachella 2013 portrait gallery, and a 360° virtual tour of the 2012 festival.

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view Best of Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival 2013 as presented by: Los Angeles Times


An untested procedure to plug the blown-out oil well in the Gulf of Mexico seemed to be working, officials said Thursday, but new estimates from scientists showed the spill has already surpassed the Exxon Valdez as the worst in U.S. history. A team of scientists trying to determine how much oil has been flowing since the offshore rig Deepwater Horizon exploded April 20 and sank two days later found the rate was more than twice and possibly up to five times as high as previously thought. The fallout from the spill has stretched all the way to Washington, where the head of the federal agency that oversees offshore drilling resigned under pressure Thursday. Even using the most conservative estimate, the new numbers mean the leak has grown to nearly 19 million gallons over the past five weeks, surpassing the size of the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska, which at about 11 million gallons had been the nation's worst spill. Under the highest Gulf spill estimate, nearly 39 million gallons may have leaked, enough to fill 30 school gymnasiums. A researcher surveys oil floating on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of La., Wednesday, May 26, 2010. Reporter Anderson Cooper is reflected in oil filled water during a tour of areas where oil has come ashore May 26, 2010 in Blind Bay, La. BP crews clean oil off of the beach at Port Fourchon, Louisiana, Monday, May 24, 2010. Oil was first spotted here on Wednesday, May 12.

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view Gulf oil spill worst in U.S. history as presented by: Sacramento Bee


500 – 700 million years ago, even before dinosaurs roamed the Earth, jellyfish were drifting along on ocean currents. Jellies are among the most spectacular and mysterious marine species in the world. They are the oldest multi-organ animal and have morphed into more than 2,000 different jellyfish species. Some live in freshwater, but jellies can be found in every ocean. Some sea jellies survive close to the surface while others dwell in extreme depths, glowing with bioluminescence in the pitch black water near the bottom of the ocean. Many scientists and deep ocean explorers expect to discover countless more beautiful jiggly jellyfish as they explore deep sea canyons, and other extreme water conditions near underwater volcano vents and in the harsh frozen temperatures of arctic waters. If there are aliens on our planet, it might be NOAA, and not NASA, to discover that in the unexplored depths of our oceans . . . this summer one leading British space scientists claimed aliens do exist and they look similar to huge jellyfish.

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view Jiggly Jellyfish from Dazzling to Deadly as presented by: Love These Pics



At midnight on Sunday, August 8th, a temporary lake caused by a recent landslide broke loose above the town of Zhouqu, in Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, China. The outflow slid down the valley as a wall of mud, wiping out houses and muli-story buildings, and killing at least 1,144 residents - with over 600 still reported as missing. More than 10,000 soldiers and rescuers arrived soon to comb through the mountains of mud that buried several parts of Zhouqu County. Engineers also worked to blast the debris that had passed through the town to partially block the Bailong River, causing further flooding. Collected here are images of the landslide-affected area of northwestern China, part of a series of disasters in Asia caused by recent heavy rains. The foot of a victim killed in a mudslide in Zhouqu County. A member of the military in protective gear pours disinfectant over body bags containing the remains of victims of a landslide in Zhouqu on August 12, 2010 in northwest China. A resident cries for her relative killed by landslide in Zhouqu County on Aug. 12, 2010. Many people held memorial ceremonies for their killed or missing relatives at the landslide area to express their grief on Thursday.

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view Landslides strike Zhouqu County, China as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Last Saturday in Moscow region there was held a rehearsal of display of military equipment as a part of International Forum called ‘Mechanical Engineering Technologies.’ There was built a special training ground for the display – a unique area that allows showing riding properties of armored and wheeled machinery to the fullest extent. There are lots of obstacles of different kinds on the training ground needed for demonstration of any types of machinery. There is a special obstacle zone for military motor vehicles. At first they move across big concrete blocks and then climb onto the stairs. In the right you can see T-90S tanks constructed by ‘Uralvagonzavod.’ A T-90S tank is a light-weight one and moreover it has powerful weaponry, high mobility and it is small sized. After the machinery finished its performance there was a field training of special branches of Russia’s enforcement agencies.

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view Mechanical Engineering Technologies as presented by: English Russia


In New York City's Financial District, hundreds of activists have been converging on Lower Manhattan over the past two weeks, protesting as part of an "Occupy Wall Street" movement. The protests are largely rallies against the influence of corporate money in politics, but participants' grievances also include frustrations with corporate greed, anger at financial and social inequality, and several other issues. Nearly 80 people were arrested last weekend in a series of incidents with the New York police as the protesters attempted to march uptown. Most are now camped out in nearby Zucotti Park. Demonstrations also took place yesterday in San Francisco, and an "Occupy Boston" protest is planned for tonight, September 30. Collected here are a handful of images of the protesters occupying Wall Street from the past two weeks.

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view Occupy Wall Street as presented by: The Atlantic


A body has been found in the desert close to the spot where a pilot disappeared after crash-landing during the war. The wreckage of the P40 Kittyhawk plane was found perfectly preserved earlier this year, 70 years after the accident, and now it seems that airman Dennis Copping's remains may have been recovered nearby. The bones were located on some rocks four months ago, along with a piece of parachute, about three miles from where the plane landed in the Sahara desert in 1942. A keychain fob with the number 61 on it was found near the remains, along with a metal button dated 1939. But the pilot's relatives claim the Ministry of Defence said that the remains were not those of the lost airman. It has since been established that the bones were never recovered or analysed, leaving open the possibility they may be those of Flight Sergeant Copping. His nephew, William Pryor-Bennett, from Kinsale, County Cork, Ireland, has now urged for DNA tests to be carried out as soon as possible. To that end, two British historians and a forensic anatomist have volunteered to travel to Egypt and recover the bones themselves. Mr Pryor-Bennett, 62, said he is ‘appalled’ at the way the matter has been handled. He said: 'The bones suspected to be those of my uncle are apparently still lying in the desert. They were found in June and should have been tested by now.

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view Bones And A Parachute Found Near Eerily Preserved Plane That Crashed In Sahara Desert 70 Years Ago as presented by: Daily Mail Online


A small war took place last week in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between Brazilian forces and hundreds of drug traffickers holed up in the shantytown complex dubbed Complexo do Alemão. After recent efforts by officials to pacify Rio's drug and gang-related violence ahead of the upcoming the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympics Games, drug gangs struck out last week - attacking police stations and staging mass robberies. After days of preparation, Brazilian security forces launched a raid in the Complexo do Alemão, where between 500 and 600 drug traffickers were holed up. At least 42 people were killed in the violence last week, with security forces taking control of many neighborhoods. A relatively low number of arrests were made, and authorities warn of further conflict as continue to flush out more suspects in Rio's maze of favelas. Alleged drug traffickers who did not want to identify themselves, pose for a photo as they stand on a street at a slum in western Rio de Janeiro. A police officer hands packages of marijuana seized during an operation against drug traffickers to a fellow officer at the Complexo do Alemão slum in Rio de Janeiro. Soldiers aim their weapons during an operation against drug traffickers at the Complexo do Alemão slum.

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view Rio's Drug War as presented by: Boston Big Picture



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