Gallery Gate

The War in Afghanistan began on October 7, 2001 as the armed forces of the United States of America and the United Kingdom, and the Afghan United Front (Northern Alliance), launched Operation Enduring Freedom, invading the country, in response to the September 11 attacks on the United States, with the stated goal of dismantling the Al-Qaeda terrorist organization and ending its use of Afghanistan as a base. The United States also said that it would remove the Taliban regime from power and create a viable democratic state. 10 Years of the war has resulted in thousands of adead soldiers, thousands of dead Taliban and thousands of dead civilians and the job is still not done. A Canadian soldier of India Company from the NATO-led coalition smokes during a lull in fighting against Taliban insurgents in Sangasar, Zari district in eastern Afghanistan, July 3, 2007. Canadian and Afghan National Army troops engaged Taliban fighters in Sangasar, killing at least two and capturing two more wounded fighters, a Canadian army official said on Tuesday. A soldier with an injured ankle from the US Army's 1-320 Field Artillery Regiment, 101st Airborne Division is assisted past his burning M-ATV armored vehicle after it struck an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) on a road near Combat Outpost Nolen in the Arghandab Valley in this picture taken July 23, 2010. None of the four soldiers in the vehicle were seriously injured in the explosion. Picture taken July 23, 2010. Anti-Taliban Afghan fighters watch several explosions from U.S. bombings in the Tora Bora mountains in Afghanistan December 16, 2001. Hundreds of al Qaeda fighters have battled to the death in a last stand in eastern Afghanistan, but their leader Osama bin Laden eluded the U.S. dragnet, Afghan commanders said on Sunday.

Share/Bookmark

view 10 Years Of War In Afghanistan as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


Egypt's military deployed on the streets of Cairo to enforce a nighttime curfew as the sun set Friday on a day of rioting and chaos that amounted to the biggest challenge ever to authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year regime. Flames rose up across a number of cities from burning tires and police cars. Even the ruling party headquarters in Cairo was ablaze in the outpouring of rage, bitterness and utter frustration with a regime seen as corrupt, heavy-handed and neglectful of grinding poverty that afflicts nearly half of the 80 million Egyptians. After nightfall, some of the protesters defied the curfew and were praying on the streets of Cairo. In one of many astonishing scenes Friday, thousands of anti-government protesters wielding rocks, glass and sticks chased hundreds of riot police away from the main square in downtown Cairo and several of the policemen stripped off their uniforms and badges and joined the demonstrators. Protestors attempt to get into Tahrir Square. Egyptian anti-riot policemen use water canons against protesters in Cairo. Riot police face protestors on the Kasr Al Nile Bridge.

Share/Bookmark

view Rioting And Chaos Engulfs Egypt's Capital as presented by: Sacramento Bee


The sweeping color of sea and sky, blue is a common thread in nature, seen in the cerulean of a whale shark (pictured here), the indigo of a stormy night, and the cobalt of a peacock's feathers. Over the centuries, the hue has come to represent calm, cold, mysticism, and sadness. The Roman aqueduct in Segovia, Spain, is pictured at twilight. Dating to the first century A.D., the well-preserved structure is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site. A dog jumps into Lake Banyoles in northern Spain. The lake is the country’s second largest.

Share/Bookmark

view Life in Color: Blue as presented by: National Geographic



NASA's website contains a wealth of amazing photographs. Here is a collection of some of my favorites from NASA's Image of the Day Gallery which can be found on the NASA website here. This image of Mars' moon Phobos was taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express. The HRSC camera is operated by the German Aerospace Center and the Mars Express mission is operated by the European Space Agency. The HRSC took this image using the nadir channel on March 7, 2010, on HRSC Orbit 7915. The image has been enhanced to bring out the features in the less illuminated areas. This image from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) shows in great detail a solar prominence taken from a March 30, 2010 eruption. The twisting motion of the material is the most noticeable feature. Launched on Feb. 11, 2010, SDO is the most advanced spacecraft ever designed to study the sun. During its five-year mission, it will examine the sun's magnetic field and also provide a better understanding of the role the sun plays in Earth's atmospheric chemistry and climate. SDO will provide images with clarity 10 times better than high-definition television and will return more comprehensive science data faster than any other solar observing spacecraft. This other worldly landscape is actually Dagze Co, one of many inland lakes in Tibet. In glacial times, the region was considerably wetter, and lakes were correspondingly much larger, as evidenced by the numerous fossil shorelines that circle the lake and attest to the presence of a previously larger, deeper lake. Over millennia changes in climate have resulted in greater aridity of the Tibetan Plateau.

Share/Bookmark

view NASA's Image of the Day Gallery as presented by: Sacramento Bee


The young man’s monochrome portrait is at least 70 years old, the whites all faded to yellow, but it is still clear he had style. His hair is slicked down, eye arched, suit perfect with matching tie and handkerchief. He also had the good fortune to escape Europe in the early days of World War II. The photo, a gift to the man who helped him escape, is one of seven recently discovered snapshots that cast light on a little known subplot of the war – even as Germany sought to seal Jewish Europeans in, a small army of tourism officials from its main ally, Japan, helped shepherd thousands away to safety. “My best regards to my friend Tatsuo Osako,” is scrawled in French on the back of the picture, which is signed “I. Segaloff” and dated March 4, 1941. His fate is unknown. An effort is under way to find the people in these portraits or their descendants, all of whom are assumed to be Jewish. Personal photos of such refugees, who often fled with few possessions, are rare. The photos were found in an old diary owned by Osako, who was a young employee of the Japan Tourist Bureau at the time, and died in 2003. Akira Kitade, who worked under Osako and is researching a book about him, has contacted Israeli officials for help and visited the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. The museum said he gave it about 30 photographs that he is trying to identify, and received a list of over 2,000 Jews who received travel papers that enabled them to reach Japan. Nissim Ben Shitrit, the Israeli ambassador to Japan, says he has passed on the information to Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, which tracks and honors victims of the Holocaust, and is optimistic some of the individuals can be tracked down. “I thought that we discovered almost everything about the horror of the Holocaust,” Shitrit said. “And yet there is more to discover.” The photos shed further light on the story of Chiune Sugihara, a Japanese diplomat stationed in Lithuania who granted transit visas to several thousand Jews in the early days of the war. In doing so, he defied strict stipulations from Tokyo that such recipients have proper funds and a clear final destination after Japan.

Share/Bookmark

view In Focus: Japan and the Holocaust as presented by: Denver Post


Large Project 775 landing craft (otherwise known as “Ropucha I”) is a series of Soviet ships designed for landing of troops and loads on the shore. They are the base of the Russian Landing Fleet. Let’s explore their history and go aboard one of them. The Russian Navy had some requirements concerning this type of ships: a large landing craft had to be capable of carrying a battalion, a medium landing craft – a company, and a small landing craft – a platoon. Ironically, all of the already existed medium landing craft didn’t meet these requirements and in 1968 it was decided to design new medium landing craft called Project 775. The new project was designed in Poland thus its main constructor was a Pole. In a process of designing ships were reclassified from medium to large landing craft. The forerunner of the future ships was built in 1974. The first series consisted of 12 ships was finished in 1978 and called “Rapoucha I” in the West. The second series consisted of 16 ships was finished in 1992. They were called “Rapoucha II”. These ships must have been substituted by new Project 778 ships but after the breakup of the USSR, in 1992, both unfinished ships were destroyed. Large Project 775 landing ships were designed exclusively for the Navy of the USSR. None of them was a part of the Navy of any member states of the Warsaw Treaty Organisation. The only exception is the large landing craft given to Yemen in 1979. Besides the transportation of troops and loads Project 775 landing ships can also be used for installation of mine barriers, delivering humanitarian supplies and people’s evacuation from dangerous areas. It is capable of carrying 650 tons and covering the 4700-mile distance in any non-freezing seas and oceans.

Share/Bookmark

view Russian Large Landing Craft as presented by: English Russia


US specialist Charlie Labonte from Apache Troop 1-75 Cavalry 2nd Brigade 101st Airborne Division, seen wearing a Santa hat, walks past tents at Sabloghay camp in Zari district of Kandahar province on December 22, 2010. One year old twins Declan, left and Dylan, right, Keefe lasted about 5 seconds on Santa's lap before mom Maria Keefe had to come get them. Parents Maria and Chris, not shown, waited almost 2 hours in line to see Santa at Flatirons Mall in Broomfield, Colorado. Santa, aka Robert Ferguson, has been Santa for over 7 years. Children wearing Santa hats light candles at the Sacred Heart Cathedral on Christmas Eve in New Delhi, India, Friday, Dec. 24, 2010. Christians in India make up just over 2 percent of its one billion population.

Share/Bookmark

view The Christmas Season Across the Globe as presented by: Denver Post


500 – 700 million years ago, even before dinosaurs roamed the Earth, jellyfish were drifting along on ocean currents. Jellies are among the most spectacular and mysterious marine species in the world. They are the oldest multi-organ animal and have morphed into more than 2,000 different jellyfish species. Some live in freshwater, but jellies can be found in every ocean. Some sea jellies survive close to the surface while others dwell in extreme depths, glowing with bioluminescence in the pitch black water near the bottom of the ocean. Many scientists and deep ocean explorers expect to discover countless more beautiful jiggly jellyfish as they explore deep sea canyons, and other extreme water conditions near underwater volcano vents and in the harsh frozen temperatures of arctic waters. If there are aliens on our planet, it might be NOAA, and not NASA, to discover that in the unexplored depths of our oceans . . . this summer one leading British space scientists claimed aliens do exist and they look similar to huge jellyfish.

Share/Bookmark

view Jiggly Jellyfish from Dazzling to Deadly as presented by: Love These Pics



view our privacy policy & terms of service