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A massive storm billed as the worst in decades barreled toward the Northeast on Wednesday, paralyzing big cities and small towns alike with deep snow and thick ice, stranding hundreds of motorists and shuttering airports and schools across the Midwest. The 20.2 inches of snow that fell by midday in Chicago made the storm the city’s third-largest on record, with still more coming down. A foot or more was dumped on parts of Missouri, Indiana, Kansas, Oklahoma and upstate New York. New York City was expected to get up to three-quarters of an inch of ice before the mix of sleet and freezing rain warms up to rain. The storm was, if not unprecedented, extraordinarily rare, National Weather Service meteorologist Thomas Spriggs said. Groundskeeper Josh Pemberton clears a path near the MU Quadrangle on Wednesday, Feb. 2, 2011 in Columbia, Mo. A sign warns people of ice during the morning commute along in lower Manhattan on February 2, 2011 in New York City. The icy weather is part of a massive winter storm that stretches from New Mexico to Maine and has brought freezing rain and blizzard conditions to more than 30 states. Michigan State University students Andrew Rennaker and Emily Vezina have fun in the heavy snowfall as they sled down the street in East Lansing, Mich. on Wednesday.

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view Captured: Huge Winter Storm Moves Across the US as presented by: Denver Post


While threats of a missile launch have renewed tensions with North Korea, photojournalist David Guttenfelder has returned to continue documenting life there. As the world watches to see what North Korea’s next move will be in a high-stakes game of brinksmanship with the United States, residents of its capital aren’t hunkering down in bunkers and preparing for the worst. Instead, they are out on the streets en masse for the birthday of national founder Kim Il Sung — the biggest holiday of the year. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry delivered a stark warning to North Korea on Friday not to test-fire a mid-range missile, while rejecting a new U.S. intelligence report suggesting significant progress in the communist regime’s nuclear weapons program. North Korean children hold up red scarves to be tied around their necks during an induction ceremony into the Korean Children's Union, the first political organization for North Koreans. North Korean soldiers stand together along a street in Pyongyang. North Koreans dance together beneath a mosaic painting of the late leader Kim Il Sung during a mass folk dancing gathering in Pyongyang Thursday, April 11, 2013, to mark the anniversary of the first of many titles of power given to leader Kim Jong Un after the death of his father Kim Jong Il.

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view Photos: David Guttenfelder in North Korea as presented by: Denver Post


A tornado as much as a mile wide with winds up to 200 mph roared through the Oklahoma City suburbs Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods, setting buildings on fire and landing a direct blow on an elementary school. Rescuers lift an injured survivor from the rubble a structure in the aftermath of the huge tornado that struck Moore, Okla., on Monday. A U.S. flag lies across an overturned car in the aftermath of a tornado in Moore, Oklahoma.

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view Powerful Tornado Slams Oklahoma as presented by: Los Angeles Times



There have always been those who are nomadic. Historically, it was often for necessity, following the needs of food, water and safety. But, there is also the hunger of movement, just for movement sake. It is the necessity to move and travel with few possessions, an endless appetite for new sights, sounds and experiences that drive individuals such as Mike Brodie. Brodie is one such adventurer, and lucky for us, he picked up a camera along the way and captured a rare take of the life of train hopping across America. Starting in 2004, at age seventeen, Brodie left his home in Pensacola, Florida; beginning a period of discovery and travel. He began meeting and sharing his adventures with a whole community of fellow nomads. You can see these photos at M+B Gallery in Los Angeles. The fact that Brodie was never formally trained in photography, and that his original intent was never to sell them or showcase them in a gallery, is the reason why they are so honest and intimate; raw and tough. This is the life on the road with a bunch of kids who could fall off a train and die at any moment, freeze in the cold, starve, get pregnant, or never value stability. It is the same group that may avoid frustration, apathy, and depression because they followed the restlessness inside and gave it a form and called it fun; or maybe just survival. Their tattoos speak volumes, “free rent” and “stay gold”. Their readings include Thompson’s: The Rum Diary, and short stories by Flannery O’Connor. They are definitely seekers, and Brodie makes us want to root for them.

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view Mike Brodie: A Period of Juvenile Properity as presented by: Off To See The Elephant


California Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. yesterday declared this week as "Wildfire Awareness Week" in recognition of last week's devastating fires northwest of Los Angeles. His proclamation noted, "In an average year, wildfires burn 900,000 acres of California's timber and grasslands." Rains that moved into the area on Monday helped extinguish the fires that started last Thursday along US Route 101 near Camarillo Springs and Thousand Oaks, endangering some 4,000 homes. A firefighting helicopter makes a drop on a wildfire on May 3 in Thousand Oaks, Calif. A huge Southern California wildfire burned through coastal wilderness to the beach on Friday then stormed back through canyons toward inland neighborhoods when winds reversed direction. A man on a rooftop looks at approaching flames as the Springs Fire continues to grow on May 3 near Camarillo, Calif. The wildfire has spread to more than 18,000 acres on day two and is 20 percent contained. Firefighter Justin Romero of the New Mexico based Silver City Hotshots uses a drip torch to build a backfire up the mountain off Potrero Road to control the Springs Fire near Newbury Park, Calif., on May 3. A fierce, wind-driven wildfire spread on Friday along the California coast northwest of Los Angeles, threatening 4,000 homes and a military base as residents were evacuated ahead of the flames and a university campus was closed.

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view Wildfires in California as presented by: Boston Big Picture


On June 7th, 2008, the nearby Rocky Mountain Airport put on an awesome airshow. I had borrowed a 100-400 telephoto lens from a friend to test with my Canon 40D DSLR. While we had a great vantage point on a second floor open patio, we were North of the runway looking into the early afternoon Sun (plus there was quite a bit of heat shimmer) so the lighting conditions were far from ideal. However, these pictures are semi-decent and provide a feel for this cool event where you could hear lotsa Jet Noise - the Sound of Freedom! So salute the men & women in uniform and their service to our country. Yaw'ing to the right - note rudder position. We had arrived as the B-25 did its last flyover, which then landed with the Colorado foothills in the background. Note only the left burner is lit plus right nozzle hasn't opened up. My brother (a former F-15 pilot) says sometimes they both don't light at the same time, although this persisted for several seconds which he said is a bit unusual.

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view Rocky Mountain Airport Airshow as presented by: Alek Komarnitsky


Images from Kerry Skarbakka‘s long-term project “The Struggle to Right Oneself” are currently on view at the Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles. “Ten Years of Falling,” as the show is appropriately named, includes 28 anxiety-ridden images of the artist in precarious situations, such as falling off rocks, ladders, buildings and trees. Skarbakka has a background in rock climbing, martial arts and acting, which makes him the perfect stuntman. The photographs are shot on location, occasionally with the use of ropes or a harness. Whatever Skarbakka lands on is intentionally obscured either in camera or, when necessary, with Photoshop. Skarbakka referred to himself as a performance-based photographer in a 2009 interview on NBC’s Today show. “I use my body to describe these tensions and anxieties I’m trying to create, and I use photography to disseminate my ideas.”"Ten Years of Falling” at the Kopeikin Gallery is currently on view through September 7, 2013.

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view Falling Forever as presented by: Photo District News


The vast devastation wrought by the earthquake and resulting tsunami that hit Japan on March 11, 2011, may only be matched by the destroyed lives left in their wake. Few survivors have been found, but families continue to search for their sons, daughters, wives, husbands and friends. Threats of a nuclear reactor meltdown and resulting disaster loom. The rubble caused by an earthquake and tsunami fill the landscape in Yamada, Iwate Prefecture, Japan, Monday, March 14, 2011, three days after northeastern coastal towns were devastated by an earthquake and tsunami. A technician in protective gear looks out an automatic door with signs reading "No entry except for those with permission" at a makeshift facility to screen, cleanse and isolate people with high radiation levels in Nihonmatsu, northern Japan March 14, 2011. A man cycles by a ship at Hachinohe, Aomori Prefecture, northern Japan, Monday, March 14, 2011, three days after a powerful earthquake-triggered tsunami hit Japan's east coast.

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view Japan: Vast Devastation as presented by: Boston Big Picture



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