Gallery Gate

They trudge up well-trod cinder paths by the thousands, headlamps glowing in the dark, and then settle in, shivering, to await and cheer the sun's blazing ascent over the horizon. Climbing Mount Fuji, Japan's most iconic landmark, is a group activity: Seldom is it climbed in solitude. The recent recognition of the 3,776-meter (12,388-foot) peak as a UNESCO World Heritage site has many here worried that it will draw still more people, adding to the wear and tear on the environment from the more than 300,000 who already climb the mountain each year. Safety is another concern. At least seven people died and 70 were hurt climbing Fuji in 2012, and traffic jams of climbers in the pre-dawn darkness can add to the risks, says Shomei Yokouchi, governor of Yamanashi, the area to the west. The official climbing season runs July to August, and the trek -- nine hours round trip in good weather -- is especially treacherous other times of the year.

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view Mt. Fuji's Heritage status worries some as presented by: Sacramento Bee


A photography technique that frequently catches my eye is the use of silhouette - placing a subject directly between a primary light source and the camera. The effect can be painterly or haunting or evocative. It can break a subject down to basic ideas conveyed only by line and shape, where an individual might appear iconic. Collected here are a handful of recent photographs from around the world, where we can only see the outlines of the subject, our minds (and the captions) are left to fill in any details in the darkness. Australian freestyle motocross rider Robbie Maddison jumps during an training session in the Sahara desert near the Giza pyramids as the sun sets in Cairo May 11, 2010 in preparation of the second stage of the Red Bull X-Fighters World Tour. Volunteers release flamingo chicks at the Fuente de Piedra natural reserve, near Malaga, in southern Spain August 7, 2010. Around 600 flamingos are ringed and measured before being placed in the lagoon, one of the largest colonies of flamingos in Europe, according to authorities of the natural reserve. South African kids play soccer in open field as sun sets in Soweto, South Africa.

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view In Silhouette as presented by: Boston Big Picture


In California, 236,000 homes were lost to foreclosure in 2008, and an additional 190,360 were foreclosed upon in 2009. The housing boom and bust that consumed Southern California cost many people their homes, their savings and their jobs. The emotional repercussions of those changes are still rippling through families across the state. Here are first-hand accounts from five Southern California families as they deal with the reality of losing their homes. Michael and Betty Palmer bought their modest Pomona home as the housing market began to boom. Like many others, they were convinced the escalating equity was as good as cash. The mortgage is upside-down and the house went into foreclosure last April. and Erik Jimenez sought help with their unmanageable mortgage in 2008 after she had to leave her job in the fashion industry due to a complicated pregnancy. They sought help from a law group and were instructed them to stop making their house payments. Months later, they received a foreclosure notice and moved to an Upland apartment. Construction worker Ismael Cervantes owned a home in a historic Pomona neighborhood. As the economy crashed, so did his opportunity to work. He resorted to selling everything he owned to try to make payments on his upside down mortgage. He persisted in the face of foreclosure proceedings, and was able to short-sale his home.

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view Foreclosing On The American Dream as presented by: Los Angeles Times



Spring floodwaters are wreaking havoc in many locations around the world this month. The most disasterous flooding came on Wednesday in France when flash floods hit the back hills of the French Riviera and turned streets into rivers of surging, muddy water. The death toll from the flooding has risen to 25. In Myanmar and Bangladesh, floods and landslides triggered by incessant monsoon rains have killed more than 100 people, officials said Thursday. In the United States, flooding in Texas, Nebraska and Wyoming has caused massive damage to farms and homes. A man takes pictures of piled up cars in Draguignan, southern France, Wednesday June 16, 2010. Regional authorities in southeastern France say more than a dozen people have been killed and many are missing in the aftermath of flash floods that followed powerful rainstorms. Unusually heavy rains recently in the Var region have transformed streets into muddy rivers that swept up trees, cars and other objects. A railroad bridge is down over the Elkhorn River near Norfolk, Neb., Wednesday, June 16, 2010. The swollen Elkhorn River crested two inches short of a levee protecting Norfolk, preventing further disaster as emergency workers Wednesday continued their search for a man who fell into the raging river after the bridge collapsed outside of town a day earlier. Buses from Rockin' "R" River Rides lie on their sides, Wednesday June 9, 2010 wrapped around trees along the banks of the Guadalupe River in the Gruene Historic District in New Braunfels, Texas. The Gaudalupe River in the area is a popular water recreation destination known for inner tube float trips.

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view Spring Floods Around The Globe as presented by: Sacramento Bee


The Battle of Gettysburg was bloody and brutal. It ended three days after it started, on July 3, 1863, leaving almost 50,000 casualties strewn across the Pennsylvania fields. The northern advance of the Confederate Army, led by General Lee, had come to a halt due to miscalculations and was now in retreat thanks to the military skill of Union General Meade. President Abraham Lincoln would visit the battlefield five months later to give his famed Gettysburg Address and to dedicate the Soldiers’ National Cemetery, and the legacy of Gettysburg would live on, in cycloramas and re-enactments, history texts and documentaries. The American Civil War was one of the first wars depicted in photographs, not paintings. Mathew Brady and his team of 17 assistants crisscrossed the battlefields with portable darkrooms, capturing the actors of war and the aftermath of fighting. Below, on the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, are images from the small Pennsylvania town that many historians say was the turning point of the Civil War.

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view The Legacy of Gettysburg as presented by: ABC News


The world's toughest off-road race, the Dakar Rally, has begun. Top drivers and riders from around the globe will have to negotiate tough terrain but without having time to enjoy the spectacular landscapes of Argentina, Bolivia and Chile. Here is a selection of photographs from this year's race. Nasser Al Attiyah of Qatar and Mathieu Baumel of France for the ALL4 Racing Mini Qatar Rally Team. Toyota's driver Giniel De Villiers of South Africa and co-driver Dirk Von Zitzewitz of Germany

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view Dakar Rally 2015: World's toughest off-road race as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


The Nikon International Small World Photomicrography Competition recently announced its list of winners for 2010. The competition began in 1974 as a means to recognize and applaud the efforts of those involved with photography through the light microscope. Peering into the small worlds of animal, plants and minerals using many techniques and different instruments, this year's entries brought us images of crystalline formations, fluorescent body parts, cellular structures and more, valuable for both their beauty and insight. The lovely folks at Nikon were kind enough to share some of their images here with us, be sure to click the link above to see all the winners. Subcutaneous rat cells called fibroblasts on a silicon microactuator magnified 20 times. Image made by Rafael Pennese of the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Lausanne, Switzerland This 5th Place image of a Strelitzia reginae (bird of paradise) seed magnified 10 times comes from Viktor Sykora of the Institute of Pathophysiology, First Medical Faculty, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. This image was made with a stereomicroscopy technique called darkfield illumination. Dr. Duane Harland took 9th place with his flourescent image of Ctenocephalides canis (flea), viewed at 20x magnification. Dr. HArland is with AgResearch Ltd. in Lincoln, New Zealand.

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view Small Worlds as presented by: Boston Big Picture


A photographer's strobe gives a violet sheen to this translucent juvenile roundbelly cowfish off the coast of Kona, Hawaii. Also known as the transparent boxfish, the roundbelly cowfish has two short horns in front of its eyes. Antarctic krill, such as this specimen in the Weddell Sea with a stomach full of yellow algae, are a critical link in the ocean food web. A pelagic, or open-ocean, octopus gives off a neon glow in Hawaii. Most species of octopus have no internal skeleton, unlike other cephalopods.

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view Translucent Creature Photos as presented by: National Geographic



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