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More than 2,300 people have been injured and one person killed during four days of fierce clashes between protesters and police in Turkey, according to a doctors' association, as the prime minister blamed 'extremist elements' for the riots. More than 1,480 people have been wounded in clashes in Istanbul, the country's largest city, with some 800 more injured in the capital Ankara and the Aegean city of Izmir.

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view Gezi Park Protests spread all over Turkey as presented by: GigaPica


A Mercedes hung from the seventh-floor parking garage at the Bank of America building in Tulsa, Okla., on Thursday. The car backed through the wall after the driver’s foot got stuck on the accelerator. Debris rained down to a parking lot below, damaging several cars, but no injuries were reported. Dr. Jimmy Shern and assistant Dianna Yang extracted a tooth from Matthew Hucko during the Remote Area Medical clinic at the Los Angeles sports arena Tuesday. The nonprofit Remote Area Medical clinic has volunteer doctors, dentists, optometrists, nurses and support staff treating uninsured and underinsured people in California. sailors of the sunken navy ship Cheonan carried portraits of deceased sailors during the funeral ceremony in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, on Thursday. At least 40 bodies were found and six sailors are still missing after a South Korean warship sank in mysterious circumstances last month near North Korean waters.

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view Pictures of the Week: April 25 - April 30 as presented by: Wall Street Journal


A protester takes cover during clashes with security forces in Ankara, Turkey. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Sunday rejected claims that he is a "dictator," dismissing protesters as an extremist fringe, even as thousands returned to the landmark Istanbul square that has become the site of the fiercest anti-government outburst in years. Protesters shout slogans during a solidarity demonstration for the protests in Istanbul in front of the Turkish Consulate in the Northern Greek city of Thessaloniki.

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One by one, the miners trapped for 69 days in a dungeon that could have been their tomb climbed into a rescue capsule and made a smooth ascent to the surface Wednesday, greeted by the embraces of loved ones, cheered by joyous Chileans and watched by a captivated world. The anxiety that had accompanied the careful final days of preparation broke at 12:11 a.m., when the stoutest of the men, Florencio Avalos, emerged from the missile-like chamber and smiled broadly after his half-mile journey to fresh air. By midday, 15 men had been pulled from the mine in roughly 12 hours, including the oldest and youngest among the trapped. The effort was methodical and free of any significant problems, and on track to finish before sunrise Thursday. In this photo released by the Chilean government, miner Jorge Galeguillos gives a thumbs up after being rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine where he had been trapped with 32 other miners for over two months. In this handout from the Chilean government, Chilean President Sebastian Pinera and Mining Minister Laurence Golborne stand with the family of Florencio Avalos while waiting for the trapped miner to exit the mine in the rescue capsule October 12, 2010 at the San Jose mine near Copiapo, Chile. The rescue operation has begun bringing up the 33 miners, 69 days after the August 5th collapse that trapped them half a mile underground. Chilean miner Juan Illanes celebrates next to the Fenix capsule after being brought to the surface following a 10-week ordeal in the collapsed San Jose mine, near Copiapo, 800 km north of Santiago, Chile on October 13, 2010. Illanes was the third from 33 to be lifted from underground.

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Thames Town is the English name for a new town in Songjiang, about 30 km from central Shanghai, China and situated on the Yangtze River. It is named after the River Thames in England, the United Kingdom. The architecture both imitates and is influenced by classic English market town styles. There are cobbled streets, Victorian terraces, corner shops - empty as in an abandoned film set. Some of the architecture has been directly copied from buildings found in England, including the church (copied from one in Clifton, Bristol) and a pub and fish and chip shop (copied from buildings in Lyme Regis, Dorset). The picturesque church and main square makes an idyllic backdrop for many Chinese Wedding photos. Chinese newlyweds pose for wedding photographs in Thames Town on November 19, 2010 in Songjiang, China. Chinese wedding couples gather daily to have their wedding portraits taken in the themed Chinese town. "Thames Town" is the English name for a newly built town in Songjiang, 35 km from central Shanghai, China and situated on the Yangtze River. It is named after the River Thames in England. The architecture both imitates and is influenced by classic English market town styles. Chinese newlyweds pose for wedding photographs in front of the Thames Town Church in Thames Town on November 19, 2010 in Songjiang, China. An assistant leans over to make final touches as Chinese newlyweds pose for photographs during a photo session in Thames Town.

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view Newlyweds in Thames Town, China as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Mursi Man, Ethiopia. Photograph by Salvatore Gebbia, My Shot. Omo River Valley, Ethiopia; Folk Festival, Croatia. Photograph by Lola Valenti, My Shot. I took this shot during a folk festival in Istria, Croatia; Parade Participant, Malaysia. Photograph by Philipp Aldrup, My Shot. Every year after the Chinese New Year, the Chinese communities in Johor Bahru, Malaysia, come together for a huge procession in which the deities of the five different dialects are jointly carried through the whole city. Various performances, operas, and rituals are shown over a couple of days.

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There are some large cottonwood trees East of our house that have had a bird nest for years. In 2005, we saw some Great Horned owls nesting there (see bottom pictures) ... but a few years later, the nest was taken over by some Red-Tailed Hawks. I didn't see any action in 2009, but in 2010, the Great Horned Owls came back to the nest - perhaps the next generation!

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Driven by the forces of sexual selection, male—and, in some instances, female—animals have evolved a dizzying array of mating displays and rituals. For jumping spiders, mating can be an tricky affair—but not for the reasons you might think. According to a recent study published in Current Biology, jumping spiders communicate during courtship using ultraviolet B (UVB) light, which humans are unable to see. While scientists have long known that certain species use UVA light for communication, this was the first study to demonstrate that some are also able to detect shorter-wavelength UVB light. The male jumping spiders have specialized scales that glow white and green when exposed to UV light; in female spiders, the palps appeared green under UV light. And the absence of UVB light effectively killed the mood: As soon as either sex was exposed to light without ultraviolet rays, the other immediately lost interest in mating. While this male mandrill may look unfriendly, mandrills are social animals that live in large groups in Africa’s rainforests. Each pack is led by a dominant, alpha male. These brightly colored, or “fatted” alpha males—as seen in this picture—are the only ones to sire offspring, and have much higher levels of testosterone than the paler, “non-fatted” males. The red color on the male’s face and genitalia also indicate its dominance within the group. What the male fiddler crabs lack in body size, he more than makes up for in claws. The large claw, or cheliped—which looks like a fiddle when moved in conjunction with the smaller claw—is used for communication, courtship, and combat. The smaller claw is used for eating and building a burrow.

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view Flash, Deception and Suicide: 10 Remarkable Tricks of Animal Mating as presented by: Discover Magazine



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