Gallery Gate

We share our world with many other species and live in an ever-changing environment. Fortunately, photographers around the world have captured the moments and beauty that allow us to see amazing views of this awe-inspiring planet. This is a collection of favorite photos from The Natural World gallery in 2011, a showcase of images of animals and environment that runs on Boston.com throughout the year. Next week's posts will take a look at the year in photos, so stay tuned. A new blue phalaenopsis orchid called "Blue Mystique" is sold by Bachman's florists in Minneapolis. The color is achieved using a patented process from Europe that colors the flowers from the inside. An Abyssinian Colobus baby yawns at the Nogeyama Zoological Gardens in Yokohama, Japan. A chameleon waits to be weighed and measured in the reptile house at the London Zoo. Every year the keepers record the heights and weights of more than 750 different species in the International Species Information System, where they can be shared with zoos across the world.

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view 50 Best Photos from The Natural World as presented by: Boston Big Picture


While investigators work to discover who placed the bombs near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, people in Boston and around the world are paying tribute to the victims. Mourners have come together for candlelight vigils, running groups have staged memorial runs, and individuals have spent time in prayer or reflection. Collected here are images of some of these memorials, from Boston to Belgrade to Beijing. Local residents attend a candlelight vigil in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, on April 16, 2013 where eight-year-old Boston Marathon explosion victim Martin Richard lived. A Little League baseball player, Martin lived in a blue Victorian house in working-class Dorchester - a Boston neighborhood dotted with "Kids at Play" traffic signs and budding trees - with his parents Bill and Denise, sister Jane, 7, and brother Henry, 10. Martin's mother and sister were seriously injured. Members of the New York Yankees and the umpires bow their heads during a moment of silence for those killed in a bomb blast at the Boston Marathon on April 15, before their MLB Interleague game with the Arizona Diamondbacks at Yankee Stadium in New York. A building at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is lit up in red, white and blue as a tribute to those who were killed or injured in the explosions at the Boston Marathon in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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view Memorials and Tributes for Boston as presented by: The Atlantic


A young fighter of the Shabab shows his grenade on the road to the frontline near Ras Lanuf, Libya. The Shabab (meaning “youth’”) have taken part in the insurrection against the government of Muammar Qaddafi for more than a month. Philip Poupin, a photojournalist based in Afghanistan, has covered conflict and human rights issues for six years, most recently covering the conflict in Libya from the rebels’ side. “These pictures were taken before the coalition strikes on the frontline. It was during the retreat of the Rebels before the allies decided to help them to avoid a massacre.” Now out of Libya for the time being, he writes, ” I wanted to stress the Youth who first went to the streets to chase the regime of Qaddafi,” before seizing weapons and launching civil war. Photographing the “mobile frontline” has been one of the most intense experiences of his life. “Rockets and bombs were firing around my head. I could clearly hear the whistle of the round passing by a few meters away. Two times I saw big rounds landing some 20 meters next to me but they did not explode. One landed in the sand and rebounded like a rugby ball. I have been in firefights before, like in Afghanistan and the Congo. But nothing compared with this one where both sides fight with artillery and very few with … kalashnikovs.”

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view Blood and Tears in Libya as presented by: Photo District News



Since winning the Miss World pageant in 2000, Priyanka Chopra has become a Bollywood superstar, penned her own column in the Hindustan Times, hosted a reality TV series and, most recently, recorded an album. Now, the 30-year-old style icon has set her sights on America. Her single “Exotic,” produced with rapper Pitbull (who appears on the track), will debut July 1 along with a video, recently shot in South Beach, Fla. It will be her first widely-released single in the U.S., with a second coming later this summer. Ms. Chopra said she shot “Exotic” in South Beach to infuse it with some heat. “The song is called ‘Exotic’ so I wanted to keep it just that,” she said. “It’s very dance-heavy, and in India, that’s what we do in all of our movies, so it definitely has an Indian flavor to it.” This scene, which includes Ms. Chopra, second right, and Pitbull, far right, was shot in a private residence in Coconut Grove, Florida, a neighborhood just south of downtown Miami. Bollywood star Priyanka Chopra, center, gets her make-up done by Robert Greene, far left, on the set of her upcoming video. Ms. Chopra’s wardrobe, hair and make-up staff help get her ready for the shoot.

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view Backstage: Former Miss World Priyanka Chopra Films Exotic as presented by: Wall Street Journal


James Lee's simple plan fell apart in the winter of 2007. The former Marine, who served two tours of duty in Iraq, had moved to rural Independence near Bishop, Calif. Lee was trying to control his wanderlust by living the simple life of a construction worker. His plan dissolved when he happened on a magazine article written by mountain climber turned war correspondent, Ed Darak. "I was never going to stay in Independence long enough to enjoy a simple life," Lee said, "I accepted this fact while reading [the article]." He was 37 years old. "I sold my house and purchased my first camera." Lee said. By January, he was back in Iraq. This time, instead of carrying a gun, the veteran of the Battle of Fallujah was carrying a camera and a notebook. Lee had always gravitated toward Afghanistan. Early in 2010, he embedded with the Afghan Security Forces. He traveled to four provinces in four months. Instead of covering the American mission in Afghanistan as most photojournalists were doing, Lee said he wanted to cover the Afghan people. "If I can't tell the story from the perspective of the Afghans, I don't want to tell the story," he said. And just as he chose a non-traditional path for covering the war in Afghanistan, Lee has also avoided the traditional path to documentary photography. Lee has no formal training in photojournalism. By choice, he remains disconnected from the professional photography world so his images won't look like traditional documentary photography. "It's not about the technique of the camera, it's about the story you're telling," Lee said.

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view James Lee in Afghanistan as presented by: Sacramento Bee


It's now been three weeks since the "Occupy Wall Street" protests began in New York City's Financial District, and the movement has grown, spreading to other cities in the U.S. Protesters have organized marches, rallies, and "occupations" from Boston to Boise, Los Angeles to New Orleans, Seattle to Tampa. Using social media, handmade signs, and their voices, they are voicing anger at financial and social inequality and protesting the influence of corporate money in politics. Seattle police recently arrested 25 protesters camping out in Westlake Park, following on the heels of 700 arrests on New York's Brooklyn Bridge last week. Collected here are a some of the scenes from these protests across the U.S. over the past week, as the movement moves forward with no signs of slowing. Protestors march through downtown Boise, Idaho, Wednesday October 5, 2011. Activists have been showing solidarity with movement in many cities, including Occupy Boise. More than 100 people withstood an afternoon downpour in Idaho's capital to protest. Police arrest a protester on New York's Brooklyn Bridge during Saturday's march by Occupy Wall Street on October 1, 2011. Protesters speaking out against corporate greed and other grievances attempted to walk over the bridge from Manhattan, resulting in the arrest of more than 700 during a tense confrontation with police. The majority of those arrested were given citations for disorderly conduct and were released, police said. A woman who identified herself as Janelle K. holds up a sign during an "Occupy Las Vegas" demonstration on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, on October 6, 2011.

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view Occupy Wall Street Spreads Beyond NYC as presented by: The Atlantic


U.S. astronaut Alan Shepard poses in his silver pressure suit in a 1963 picture from the early days of NASA's Mercury space program. Thursday marks the 50th anniversary of Shepard becoming the first American in space, when he completed a short suborbital voyage aboard the Freedom 7 spacecraft. Less than a month before, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin had become the first human in space with his successful orbital flight aboard the Vostok 1 spacecraft. (See "Yuri Gagarin: First Human Space Flight in Pictures.") Over the decades, the U.S. space suit has evolved as astronauts' duties have become more complicated. The suit Shepard wore during his 16-minute flight was designed by aerospace manufacturer B.F. Goodrich. Called the Mark-IV, it was essentially a converted Navy-pilot suit, said Bill Ayrey, a space suit historian with ILC Dover in Delaware.

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view Space Suit Evolution Since First NASA Flight as presented by: National Geographic


Inventors are often perceived as eccentric, original thinkers inspired by dreams, but many of the products at the 38th Exhibition of Inventions in Geneva showed skill, pragmatism and good business sense. Roland, left, and Raymond de la Celle from France with their orthopaedic equipment and life assistant for dogs who have had spinal surgery or who are permanently disabled. The equipment allows stimulating movements on their hind legs allowing them to recover some mobility. On average, about 45 percent of the inventions presented during the 38-year old fair have been put on sale abroad through licensing contracts. Last year those contracts were wrth a total of 29.6 million euros. Belgium's Alexis Babusiaux with his one-handed bottle opener. French engineer Janick Simeray displays his electromagnetic plinth that can levitate small objects like this ball. Simeray has patented 120 inventions and reinvests his profits in research.

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view The 38th Exhibition of Inventions held in Geneva as presented by: Telegraph Media Group



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