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In the years 1967-1968 the student protests escalated not only in France but also in Great Britain, Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Sweden, West Germany, Italy, Spain, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Japan, Brazil, Uruguay, Mexico, the United States, and Australia. The events known as the "May 1968", began in the student protests that the immediate cause was the removal of the protesters by the police department occupied the Sorbonne in Paris. These protests led to several weeks of a general strike that paralyzed the country. The protests were initially directed against przestarzalemu and skostnialemu education system. Later, students in collaboration with workers, focused on governing the state. (As a result, in a speech on May 30, President Charles de Gaulle announced the dissolution of the National Assembly and new elections on June 23. Has urged workers to return to work and threatened the introduction of a state of emergency.) Events in May 1968 resulting in the reforms had far-reaching effects of cultural, political and economic life of France. A lot of popularity among the workers lost the Communists of the PCF, has gained in importance and the radical left - the Revolutionary Communist League (Ligue Communiste revolutionnaire).

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Though the calendar says that 11 days remain until the first day of summer, temperatures in much of the northern hemisphere are already sweltering. Large parts of the American northeast experienced record high temperatures this week, while dry, hot weather in the American southwest and eastern Russia sparked numerous wildfires. Today's collection shows some of the ways people (and animals) have been coping with or enjoying the late spring heat. Linkous Sharp of Nashville, Tennessee, flips water out of his hair as he cools off during the opening day of the Bonnaroo Music Festival in Manchester, Tennessee, on Thursday, June 9, 2011. Surfer Tyler Hollmer Cross of Australia rides an 8-meter wave at Shipstern Bluff near Hobart in Tasmania March 17, 2011. According to local media reports, surfers were towed by jetski into one of the biggest swells seen at Shipstern Bluff, formerly known as Devil's Point, in 10 years. Picture taken on March 17, 2011. Lightning streaks across the sky while Athens-Clarke Firefighters work to extinguish a hay fire that was caused by a lightning strike, on Thursday, May 26, 2011, in Athens, Georgia, Firefighters responded to many small fires caused by downed powerlines from a severe thunderstorm.

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view Summer Is Nearly Here as presented by: The Atlantic


New Zealand’s north island is home to Mount Taranaki, or Mount Egmont, a 2,518 meter (8,261 ft) tall active volcano. Taranaki is quite young for a volcano, having become active only 135,000 years ago. Its most recent activity was a mere 160 years ago. Mount Taranaki is the center of the Egmont National Park, the circular tree-line boundary of which can be seen in two of the photos below. Visitors to the mountain can enjoy the Manganui ski resort for skiing and snowboarding. Those more adventurous types can trek to the summit during the summer months. The closest major town is New Plymouth, just north of the mountain, where all types of hotels and other accommodation can be found.

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From Spain to Romania to Columbia, Christmas displays light up the night. A solitary spruce tree, decorated with battery-powered holiday lights controlled by a timer, greets motorists traveling the Glenn Highway near Palmer, Alaska, on Sunday afternoon, December 5, 2010. Twin Peaks, located in the Chugach Mountains, is visible in the distance. The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree is lit on November 30, 2010 in New York. Originally from Mahopac, New York,. the 12-ton, 74-foot Norway Spruce is adorned with 30,000 environmentally friendly LED lights on more than five miles of electrical wire, and topped with a Swarovski crystal star. A colourfully decorated house is iluminated with Christmas lights in the evening hours in the northern German city of Hamburg on December 15, 2010 in Hamburg, Germany.

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Angel Falls is the world’s highest waterfall at 979 meters (3,212 feet). Because the water falls so far it becomes a fine mist which can be felt a mile away before it reaches the ground below. The falls spill from a cliff near the summit of Mount Auyantepui into the Kerep River (also called the Rio Gauya). Named after the American aviator Jimmie Angel, Angel Falls is located in the state of Bolívar in Venezuela and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The falls is becoming a popular tourist destination, but it is still difficult to visit. To get to the base of the falls one must fly to Canaima camp and embark on a river trip from there. River trips can be taken only from June to December, as the river to too low in the dryer months. Alternatively, one can book an aerial flyby of the falls, but a view of the falls is not guaranteed as they are usually surrounded by clouds.

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Day 4 of Documerica Week on In Focus, featuring regions of the U.S. covered by the photographers of the Documerica Project in the early 1970s. Today we visit the state of Texas, where photographers captured images of industrialized waterfronts, small town daily life, impoverished neighborhoods, ranch workers, fun at the beach, and more. The Documerica Project was put together by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1971, with a primary goal of documenting adverse effects of modern life on the environment, but photographers were also encouraged to record the daily life of ordinary people, capturing a broad snapshot of America. Come back tomorrow for part 5 of Documerica Week, when we head northwest.

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view America in the 1970s: Texas as presented by: The Atlantic


From the titans of high technology to teenagers armed with iPads, millions of people around the world mourned digital-gadget genius Steve Jobs as a man whose wizardry transformed their lives in big ways and small. Google, Sony, Samsung, Microsoft -- corporate giants that have all been bruised in dustups with Jobs' baby, the technology prodigy Apple -- put their rivalries aside Thursday to remember the man behind the iconic products that define his generation: the iPod, the iPhone, the iPad. Fans for whom the Apple brand became a near-religion grasped for comparisons to history's great innovators, as well as its celebrities, to honor the man they credit with putting thousands of songs and the Internet in their pockets. In this Jan. 15, 2008, file photo, Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up the new MacBook Air after giving the keynote address at the Apple MacWorld Conference in San Francisco. A message is written on the window of the Apple Store in Santa Monica, Calif., Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2011.

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view Millions Mourn Genius Steve Jobs as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Some fish scorn the easy life of the shoreline, and instead spend most of their lives out to sea, wandering in the wild blue yonder. In a new book from the University of Chicago Press, Fishes of the Open Ocean, author Julian Pepperell lets readers get up close and personal with these impressive and mysterious ocean denizens. This gorgeous picture shows a flying fish gliding towards touchdown on the smooth sea. The flying fish achieves takeoff by flapping its tail at speeds of 50 to 70 beats per second, and spreading its "wings," or modified fins. Scientists have observed flying fish traveling more than 400 yards in a single flight, though Pepperell writes that such distances are only achieved when the fish dips its whirring tail back into the water a few times for extra bursts of propulsion. ale sharks' habits are still poorly understood, but electronic tagging is beginning to reveal their secrets. Scientists recently realized that whale sharks aren't slow, lumbering creatures as previously thought; instead they leverage their massive weight to dive-bomb through the water like a hawk falling through the sky. he black marlin is a giant of the ocean, measuring up to 13 feet in length and weighing up to 1,500 pounds. The fish cruises the Pacific and Indian oceans in search of smaller fish to devour, and sometimes uses its spear-like upper jaw to stun its prey.

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view Serpents, Flyers and Hammers: Strange Fish That Rule the Open Sea as presented by: Discover Magazine



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