Gallery Gate

Dan Winters offers an exclusive view on America’s space shuttles and space exploration through his most recent work, Last Launch, at the Fahey/Klein Gallery in Los Angeles. The exhibition opens tomorrow, July 11 and runs through August 31. With special access, Winters photographed NASA’s Space Shuttle program’s last launches of space shuttles Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour which took place from February to May of 2011. He takes viewers on exclusive tours inside and outside the shuttle, even placing automatically-controlled cameras around the launch pads.

Share/Bookmark

view A Last Look at Space Shuttles as presented by: Photo District News


Rescue teams fought gusty winds and altitude sickness Thursday as survivors faced a second night outside in freezing weather after strong earthquakes left more than 600 dead and 9,000 hurt in a mountainous Tibetan area of western China. Rescuers, tired from the high winds and thin oxygen, pulled survivors and more bodies from the pulverized remains of the town flattened by Wednesday morning's quake, the largest of which was magnitude 6.9. About 15,000 houses have collapsed. "We've seen too many bodies and now they're trying to deal with them. The bodies are piled up like a hill. You can see bodies with broken arms and legs and it breaks your heart," said Dawa Cairen, a Tibetan who works for the Christian group the Amity Foundation and was helping in rescue efforts. "You can see a lot of blood. It's flowing like a river." Just after dusk, about 20 Buddhist monks in burgundy robes and their friends sat by a pile of smoldering rubble where the Jieji temple used to be. Next to them lay the body of a middle-aged monk, covered in a blanket wrapped by an elastic cord with his foot sticking out. Four other bodies were in a nearby car.

Share/Bookmark

view Rescuers Search For Survivors Of China Earthquake as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Bessie Mae Berger, center, and her two sons represent a most unusual face of homelessness in Los Angeles County. She's 97. Her sons Larry, left, and Charlie are both in their 60s. The three of them live together -- in a 1973 Chevy Suburban. Updated: Berger and her two sons have received a temporary home, compliments of a nonprofit Los Angeles housing group. Bessie Mae Berger died Monday, Jan. 20, in a Sherman Oaks hospital after suffering a stroke and heart attack.

Share/Bookmark

view She's 97 and homeless as presented by: Los Angeles Times



With the U.S. troop surge now nearing its peak in Afghanistan, more than 150,000 US and international troops are now on the ground. 64 of those troops lost their lives this month, as forces pushed hard into the southern Kandahar Province, traditionally the heartland of the Taliban. At the same time, preliminary discussions are beginning to take place between the inner circle of President Hamid Karzai and members of the Quetta shura, the leadership group that oversees the Taliban war effort inside Afghanistan. Part of the current coalition strategy is to continue applying pressure on the Taliban in the fields, and encouraging their leaders to participate in hoped-for settlement talks. Collected here are images of the country and conflict over the past month, part of an ongoing monthly series on Afghanistan. Afghan firemen hose down a burning oil tanker after an explosive device planted underneath it exploded, on the Jalalabad-Torkham highway, east of Kabul. Chief of Defense of the Swedish Armed Forces, General Sverker Göranson, place the Medal of Honor on the coffin of Kenneth Wallin, killed in action on an ISAF mission in Mazar-i Sharif in Afghanistan on Saturday, during a ceremony at Arna military airport north of Stockholm, Tuesday Oct. 19, 2010. Wallin was the 6th Swedish soldier killed in action in Afghanistan. Sgt. Thomas James Brennan of Randolph, Massachusetts, from the First Battalion Eighth Marines Alpha Company, smokes a cigarette in his bunk surrounded by photographs of his wife Melinda and their daughter Madison, 2, after a night of rain at the remote outpost of Kunjak in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province.

Share/Bookmark

view Afghanistan, October, 2010 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


A look at daily life as viewed by photojournalists working for the Associated Press and its member newspapers. Fairgoers take a spin on one of the many rides provided by Butler Entertainment at the California State Fair on July 14, 2013 in Sacramento, Calif. A Child walks on a shadow casted on the floor at a shopping mall in Beijing, China. A cow looks out a window at the alpine dairy Bindalm near Berchtesgaden, southern Germany, Thursday, July 11, 2013. The alpine dairy is run by the Josef and Elisabeth Wurm family. Each year they work on the alpine farm from June to September and produce milk and cheese. They sell the products to visitors, hikers and mountain bikers.

Share/Bookmark

view Daily Life, Mid-summer 2013 as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Flooding on a scale rarely seen in New England forced hundreds of people from their homes Wednesday, overwhelmed sewage systems to the point that families were asked to stop flushing toilets, and washed out bridges and highways from Maine to Connecticut. Hardest hit by three days of record-breaking rain was Rhode Island, where the worst flooding in 200 years could persist for several more days and permanently close businesses already struggling in the weak economy. Flood waters surround the Warwick Mall in Warwick, R.I., Wednesday, March 31, 2010. Rhode Island rivers overflowed their banks, causing flooding and road closures after three days of record breaking rains. A submerged car sits on Dickinson Road March 31, 2010 in Fall River, Massachusetts. Heavy rains over the last few days have caused widespread flooding in New England, with rivers cresting well over high marks in what officials are calling a 50 year storm. Wayne Tavares takes what he can and evacuates his Perkins Street home as the Pawtuxett River over flows causing evacutions March 30, 2010 in Cranston, Rhode Island. The second major rain storm of March hammered the Northeast today causing flooding and evacuations. National Guard troops were activated in Massachusetts and Rhode Island where a state of emergency was declared.

Share/Bookmark

view Captured: Record Northeast Flooding as presented by: Denver Post


A protester takes cover during clashes with security forces in Ankara, Turkey. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Sunday rejected claims that he is a "dictator," dismissing protesters as an extremist fringe, even as thousands returned to the landmark Istanbul square that has become the site of the fiercest anti-government outburst in years. Protesters shout slogans during a solidarity demonstration for the protests in Istanbul in front of the Turkish Consulate in the Northern Greek city of Thessaloniki.

Share/Bookmark

view Anti-Government demonstrations in Turkey as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


These remarkable photographs came to our attention after we published several postcards from a new book on the atomic age in a recent weekend edition, including one that featured a colorized version the atomic bomb test of shot Charlie that you see here. Mr. Verdooner sent us these images after seeing the vintage postcards published in the WSJ newspaper. We were struck by the beauty of the images, and were delighted when he agreed to be interviewed about his experience shooting them. Sergeant Marcel Verdooner was 24 years old on April 22, 1952, when he witnessed an atomic bomb detonation reportedly 10 times more powerful than the one that hit Hiroshima. He was a member of the 301st Signal Photographic Company detachment of 21 photographers assigned to Yucca Flats, six of whom are still living today. Mr. Verdooner describes what he saw as shot Charlie was dropped, in his position about ten miles from ground zero: “The first photo here was taken after the initial fireball was burned out and the stem of the mushroom started to develop from the sand on surface of the desert. The colors in the fireball were indescribably beautiful. This image shows the shock wave traveling across the desert. After I took this photo I had to kneel down, turn my back to the shock wave and brace myself. The fireball was followed by the forming and rising of the mushroom cloud in the second photo. The vacuum created by the fireball sucked material inwards, which creates the mushroom shape.” Shot Charlie was the first public and televised atomic bomb test in the US.

Share/Bookmark

view The View from Ground Zero as presented by: Wall Street Journal



view our privacy policy & terms of service