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A Palestinian reacted after seeing a mosque that was gutted by a fire in the Liban al-Sharqiya on Tuesday. Palestinians accused Jewish settlers of setting fire to the mosque in the occupied West Bank, an incident that coincided with a U.S. envoy’s mission to get Middle East peace talks going. Israeli security officers were at the scene investigating the fire but haven’t determined its cause. A Russian military brass orchestra performed during a medal ceremony for British, U.S. and French military personnel who took part in a parade marking the 65th anniversary of the victory over Nazi troops in Moscow, on Wednesday. Detroit Police Officer Gregory Barrett held a picture of slain Officer Brian Huff, 42, before marching to a memorial service Friday. Officer Huff was shot while responding to a call Monday at a suspected drug house. Four other officers were wounded. The suspect was apprehended.

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view .Pictures of the Week: May 3 - May 6 as presented by: Wall Street Journal


It's been one year since the earth shook so violently below Port-au-Prince, Haiti, destroying and damaging hundreds of thousands of buildings and lives in mere moments. Twelve months of struggle and heartache have followed, with very little progress to show so far. Only five percent of the rubble has been cleared as crippling "indecision" has stalled reconstruction efforts, a recent report by humanitarian group Oxfam said. It's not clear when Haiti will be fully rebuilt, with five years needed just to rehouse the government, a top minister recently told an AFP reporter. On this somber anniversary, here are some photos of (and by) Haitians as they continue to cope with the aftermath of such a massive disaster. worker carries crosses to be placed in a the ground as they build a memorial in memory of the tens of thousands killed and buried in the mass grave at Titanyen on January 11, 2011 on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Soccer players from Haiti's Zaryen team (in blue) and the national amputee team fight for the ball during a friendly match at the national stadium in Port-au-Prince January 10, 2011. Sprinting on their crutches at breakneck speed, the young soccer players who lost legs in Haiti's earthquake last year project a symbol of hope and resilience in a land where so much is broken. A man listens to the radio inside his battery-charging business at Petionville Club golf course IDP camp in Port-au-Prince January 7, 2011. Reconstruction has barely begun in Haiti a year after its catastrophic earthquake, a leading international charity said on Wednesday in a report sharply critical of a recovery commission led by former U.S. President Bill Clinton.

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view Haiti, One Year Later as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Starting late last week, with several small protests denouncing a hike in public transport fares, demonstrations flared up yesterday, encompassing larger public anger at poor public services, police violence and government corruption. More than 200,000 took to the streets of Brazil's biggest cities yesterday, voicing frustration with the billions of dollars set aside for upcoming sports events like the World Cup and the 2014 Olympics, despite crushing levels of poverty in some places, and underfunded public education, health, security and transportation. Though the majority of the protests were peaceful, a few violent demonstrations were broken up by police in Rio de Janeiro. 8

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view Protests Spread Across Brazil as presented by: The Atlantic



British photographer Joel James Devlin has produced a series of enchanting night images of lakes, streams, and the shore in southern England, by making long exposures at night with a film camera. In the image above, Devlin shot a small light-emitting diode (LED) light floating on the surface of a lake for about 40 minutes. (See "Photographing the Night Sky.") Devlin told National Geographic he made most of the photos in the series during the winter months, when the sky was darker and the weather was a bit more turbulent. Devlin said he has long experimented with night photography. "Someone had given me a little LED light that was used for landing helicopters. It was a bizarre little contraption, but it was water immersible," Devlin said. "Each weekend I'm drawn to the sea [because] I'm a keen surfer, and one evening I wondered what would happen if I got this light into the surf and tracked it for a while," he said. Devlin improvised a little flotation device for the light. Over six weekends, he tried photographing the light in the waves, but he wasn't happy with any of the exposures. He said there was too much motion in the water.

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view Light Paths Reveal Water Currents as presented by: National Geographic


The shipwrecked Costa Concordia cruise liner completed its final journey Sunday, reaching Genoa where it will be scrapped, according to the Associated Press. Pulled by tugboats and nudged by winds, the ship eased into the port in this northwestern Italian city. In January 2012, The Concordia struck a reef when its captain sailed too close to Giglio Island off Tuscany’s coast and capsized, killing 32 people. Last year, salvage workers were able to pull the Costa Concordia cruise ship upright, one of the biggest and costliest operations of its kind. On Wednesday, tugboats pulling the wreck began the five-day journey to Genoa, headquarters of ship owner Costa Crociere Spa and the port where the luxury vessel first set sail in 2005.

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view The Costa Concordia, Before and After as presented by: Wall Street Journal


A wildfire spurred by high winds is raging across Southern California, scorching more than 8,000 acres of land and sending thousands of resident fleeing from their homes as new evacuations are ordered. More than 2,000 homes in the Camarillo, Calif., area have been threatened, while 15 have sustained damage. About 10 percent of the fire has been contained as more than 900 first responders are on the scene battling the flames. There have been no reports of injuries.

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view California Wildfires Cause Thousands To Flee Homes as presented by: GigaPica


Antiretroviral therapy, in the past considered a miracle only available to HIV patients in the West, is no longer scarce in many of the poorest parts of the world. Pills are cheaper and easier to access, and HIV is not the same killer that once left thousands of orphaned children in sub-Saharan Africa. But Myanmar, otherwise known as Burma, remains a special case. Kept in the dark for so many decades by its reclusive ruling junta, this country of 60 million did not reap the same international aid as other needy nations. Heavy economic sanctions levied by countries such as the United States, along with virtually nonexistent government health funding, left an empty hole for medicine and services. Today, Myanmar ranks among the world's hardest places to get HIV care, and health experts warn it will take years to prop up a broken health system hobbled by decades of neglect.

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view In Myanmar, Only Sickest HIVPatients Get Drugs as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Robotic probes launched by NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and others are gathering information all across the solar system. We currently have spacecraft in orbit around the Sun, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, and Saturn, and two operational rovers on Mars. Several others are on their way to smaller bodies, and a few are heading out of the solar system entirely. Although the Space Shuttle no longer flies, astronauts are still at work aboard the International Space Station, performing experiments and sending back amazing photos. With all these eyes in the sky, I'd like to take another opportunity to put together a recent photo album of our solar system -- a set of family portraits, of sorts -- as seen by our astronauts and mechanical emissaries. This time, we have a great shot of comet Pan-STARRS between the Earth and Sun, some very sharp images from Mars rover Curiosity, a preview image of Comet ISON, potentially the "comet of the century", when it approaches in November, intriguing glimpses of Saturn and its moons, and, of course, lovely images of our home, planet Earth. ASA's Cassini spacecraft has delivered this view of Saturn, taken while the spacecraft was in Saturn's shadow, on December 18, 2012. The cameras were turned toward Saturn and the sun so that the planet and rings were backlit. This special, very-high-phase viewing geometry lets scientists study ring and atmosphere phenomena not easily seen at a lower phase. Dozens of coronal loops gyrate above several active regions of the sun, as they were rotating into view on October 17, 2012. When viewed in extreme ultraviolet light, the dancing loops of competing and connecting magnetic field lines become visible.

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view Around the Solar System as presented by: The Atlantic



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