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ellow evokes the shine of the sun and is found throughout nature and the man-made world as a color that commands attention. This highly visible hue is found on everything from bumblebees to school buses, traffic signs to highlighters. Misbehaving soccer players are shown yellow as a warning, and Tour de France racers know the man in yellow is the rider to beat. The upper floors of Shanghai’s 88-story Jin Mao Tower provide a dizzying view of hotel rooms and offices below. Standing nearly 1,380 feet, the tower is one of the tallest buildings in China. The yellow hues of a small home in Lanai City, Hawaii, are matched by its owner's vintage Plymouth. Many residents of this village live in such pastel-pain ted cottages, first built for pineapple plantation workers. Eyelash vipers are indigenous to Central and South America and come in a variety of colors, including shocking yellow.

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view Life in Color: Yellow as presented by: National Geographic


Southeast of mainland Greece in the southern Aegean Sea lies the stunning island of Santorini. A volcanic island, Santorini is an arid environment with a hot desert climate and very little rainfall, one of the only two environments of its kind in Europe. Fira, the capital, and Oia are the two main cities to visit on the island. The buildings and home of Santorini are the island’s most striking feature, consisting of whitewashed cube shaped houses, many with beautiful blue domed roofs. The hot climate and lovely black sand beaches make lounging on the beach with a delicious drink a favorite activity for visitors. Santorini is also home to wine vineyards, and a variety of world renowned vegetables, including tomatoes, white eggplants, and cucumbers. The island also has an airport which receives flights from Olympic Air, Aegean Airlines and Athens Airways. Fantastic accommodation for any budget can be found on this magnificent unique island.

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view Santorini, Greece as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


A protest in Istanbul, Turkey, that began as a relatively small event earlier in the week, erupted into massive anti-government demonstrations across the country following a harsh crackdown by riot police. People had gathered in Gezi Park to prevent the demolition of the last remaining green public space in the center of Istanbul as part of a major renewal project. Pent-up anger against Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Islamist-rooted Justice and Development Party flared up after the violent breakup of the Gezi Park protest, fueling the fiercest anti-government demonstrations in years. Yesterday, more than a thousand protesters were arrested in 90 different demonstrations across Turkey. Prime Minister Erdogan has issued several defiant and dismissive messages, urging demonstrators to go home -- which they appear to be ignoring, as thousands have gathered once again in Taksim Square today, starting a third day of protest. People sit, hours before riot police use tear gas and pressurized water to quash a peaceful demonstration by hundreds of people staging a sit-in protest to try and prevent the demolition of trees at an Istanbul park. Police moved in at dawn Friday to disperse the crowd on the fourth day of the protest against a contentious government plan to revamp Istanbul's main square, injuring a number of protesters. The protesters are demanding that the square's park, Gezi, be protected. A Turkish riot policeman sprays tear gas as people protest against the destruction of trees in a park brought in Taksim Square in Istanbul. A woman opens her arms as police use a water cannon to disperse protesters on June 1, 2013 during a protest in Istanbul.

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view In Turkey: Days of Anti-Government Protests and Harsh Crackdowns as presented by: The Atlantic



One in five people in the UK suffer from hay fever every year - but even the worst affected could appreciate the beauty of pollen grains blown up by a million times. This gallery features false-colour scanning electron microscope pictures of the causes of hay fever. The number one culprit according to scientists is grass pollen - which close-up looks like a bundle of knobbly peas. The second biggest cause of hay fever is birch pollen. Steve Gschmeissner, a retired scientific photographer from Bedford who has access to a scanning electron microscope, says: "A single birch catkin can contain five and half million pollen grains. Since a birch tree may carry several thousand catkins, the amount of pollen produced by several thousand trees in whole birch woods boggles the mind." A false-colour scanning electron micrograph of a pollen grain from a birch tree, which is highly allergic. Birch tree pollen is transported by the wind, and so is light with a smooth, non-sticky surface to aid its dispersal over distances of thousands of kilometres.

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view Scanning Electron Microscope Pictures Of Pollen Grains as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


The city of Kaoshiung in southwestern Taiwan is home to the stunning man-made Lotus Lake. The lake is a popular tourist destination famous for its many temples and its large statue of the Emperor of the Dark Heaven, a Taoist God. The most popular temples are the Spring and Autumn Pavilions, the Dragon and Tiger Pagodas, and the Confucian Temple. As its name suggests, Lotus Lake is famous for the many beautiful pink lotus flowers blooming around the rim of the lake. Lotus Lake is easy to get to by train from Kaoshiung city center, and the sights are best explored on foot.

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view Lotus Lake, Kaoshiung, Taiwan as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


In the month of September 2012, the United States completed its withdrawal of the 33,000 troops deployed to Afghanistan in the "surge" of 2009. However, the U.S. still has 86,000 troops engaged in Operation Enduring Freedom, even as some coalition members are now finishing up their deployments. Also this month, coalition troops have curtailed joint operations with Afghan Army and police forces, due to increased attacks on foreign soldiers by members of the Afghan forces -- and heightened tensions resulting from widespread anger over an anti-Islam movie produced in the U.S. Gathered here are images of those involved in this conflict over the past month, as part of the ongoing series here on Afghanistan. Dust kicks off the ground during an operation by US Army soldiers attached to the 2nd platoon, C-Coy. 1-23 Infantry based at Zangabad foward operating base in Panjwai district after an A-POBS detonation on a nearby road during a dawn operation, on September 23, 2012. Haley Leonard holds on to her father, SFC Kyle Leonard, after he arrived at a homecoming ceremony with his unit, the 713th Engineer Company of the Indiana Army National Guard, at the Army Aviation Support Facility in Gary, Indiana, on September 26, 2012. The 713th Engineers were returning from a deployment in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. Six soldiers from the unit were killed during the deployment. Spc. Sarah Sutphin removes her new body armor after training on a firing range on September 18, 2012, in Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Female soldiers from 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division are field testing the first Army body armor designed to fit women's physiques in preparation for their deployment to Afghanistan this fall.

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view Afghanistan, September 2012: The End of the Surge as presented by: The Atlantic


BP was encouraged early Friday by results from an experimental cap on its busted Gulf of Mexico well, saying everything was holding steady 17 hours into the effort. BP vice president Kent Wells said on a conference call that there was no evidence of a leak in the pipe under the sea floor, one of the main concerns. Wells spoke 17 hours after valves were shut to trap oil inside the cap, a test that could last up to 48 hours. BP finally stopped oil from spewing into the sea Thursday, for the first time since an April 20 explosion on the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon oil rig killed 11 workers and unleashed the spill 5,000 feet beneath the water's surface. But the cap is a temporary measure. Even if it holds, BP needs to plug the gusher with cement and mud deep underground, where the seal will hold more permanently than any cap from above could. Rain falls on oil sheen on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil well leak off the coast of Louisiana Thursday, July 15, 2010. Crew members onboard the Pacific Responder oil skimming vessel prepared to skim oil this morning, but operations were put on standby after lightning was spotted nearby. A munson boat pulling boom passes a transrec machine as it is lifted back onto the deck of the Pacific Responder oil skimming vessel on the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana Thursday, July 15, 2010. The machine vacuums oily water contained by the booms into tanks on the vessel, where it can then be separated. Booms pulled by the Pacific Responder oil skimming vessel contain oil on the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana.

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view Experimental Cap Stops Oil Flowing Into The Gulf as presented by: Sacramento Bee


This gallery is a selection of some standout portraits from Review of the Weekend edition of the WSJ. The “Creating” section of Review is where artists and writers, choreographers and composers mingle with monster-truck drivers, magicians, whiskey distillers, tattoo artists and fashion designers. Each week features a fresh subject who divulges secrets to their creative process, along with often-surprising details of the trade and behind-the-scenes dishing. Read on as “Creating” photographers share details about the recent shoots. Tarina Tarantino, jewelry designer, Los Angeles, CA. Photographer Emily Shur: “Photographing Tarina was like shooting a modern day fairy princess with a wicked business sense. Her workspace was fun and whimsical, yet busy and organized. I like meeting and photographing successful women who seem to have fun at work and clearly are respected by everyone around them.” Marie Wright, flavorist, South Brunswick, New Jersey. Photographer Kyoko Hamada: “I had been warned that Marie’s lab might be a bit like Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. Upon entering the lab, we were overwhelmed with the smells of bubble gum, lemon, coffee beans, chocolate, tangerine, and what I’m guessing may have been cupcake, soap, vanilla, banana and amaretto, all mixed together in what was an otherwise very stark and minimal laboratory. It was strange to think that the smells which were so omnipresent in the air were completely invisible to the naked eye. Rob Hall, owner of Almost Human special effects, Los Angeles, CA. Photographer Sam Comen: “Rob Hall’s studio was an embarrassment of riches when it came to props and scenic elements to inspire a portrait of the FX mastermind. Unfortunately, nearly all of those elements were very gory and realistic, and therefore very difficult to use in light current news focused on congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords’ shooting in Tucson just 5 days prior. So my plan was to showcase Rob’s special effects without being grim. I found my inspiration in the studio’s cramped and dusty loft: a set of giant insect legs peeking out behind a foam-rubber human torso. I added a colorful fly swatter, explained my idea to Rob, had my assistants perch on a ladder with the giant legs, and after some work we had our shot.”

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view Favorite Creating Portraits as presented by: Wall Street Journal



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