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For more than a month, refugees have been fleeing the violence and uncertainty of Libya into Tunisia. The United Nations High Commission for Refugees has reported nearly 180,000 people have fled -- a rate of 2,000 a day. Most end up at border transit camps, desperately trying to find a way home. Here are the faces of a few of them. A Sudanese migrant fleeing the unrest in Libya holds her child as she walks at the Tunisian border crossing of Ras Jdir on March 2. A Tunisian girl waits for her father to cross the border into Tunisia at the border crossing of Ras Jdir after fleeing unrest in Libya on Feb. 23. Thousands of Tunisians have been fleeing Libya after a bloody crackdown on protests against the rule of Moammar Khadafy. At least 30,000 Tunisians had been living in Libya, and officials fear they could become targets because of Tunisia's role in inspiring uprisings across the Arab world. Tunisia's authoritarian president, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, was overthrown in January. A refugee carries a mattress to his tent at a UN displacement camp on March 5 in Ras Jdir, Tunisia. In addition to Tunisians, tens of thousands of guest workers from Egypt, Bangladesh, and other countries have been fleeing to the border of Tunisia to escape the violence. Fledgling Tunisia has been overwhelmed by the deluge.

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view Faces of the Displaced as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Defying a deadly government crackdown, tens of thousands of protesters on Wednesday poured into the streets of Yemen’s second largest city in the latest demonstrations against the long serving president. Two groups of protesters met up in the city center where a general strike had closed shops and banks in what activists were calling the “Tsunami of Taiz” and the largest demonstration in this troubled southern city to date. More than 120 people have been killed since Yemen’s protests calling for the removal of President Ali Abdullah Saleh began on Feb. 11, inspired by popular uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt. In Taiz alone, 16 people were killed Monday when government forces opened fire on demonstrators. The rising death toll across the country has helped inflame public opinion against the government and sent even more people flooding into the streets of the Arab world’s most impoverished country. Running out of food, water and oil, Yemen is wracked by a tribal rebellion in the north, a separatist movement in the south and the presence of an al-Qaida affiliate operating in the remote mountainous hinterlands. Saleh has been a U.S. ally in the fight against al-Qaida, but there are signs he is losing American support. An injured anti-government protestor looks on after being treated in a field hospital during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen, Tuesday, April 5, 2011. Tribesmen loyal to Yemen's embattled president on Tuesday clashed with a group of soldiers whose commander has sided with the opposition, and the fighting in a suburb of the capital Sanaa left three tribesmen dead, according to tribal elders and military officials. An elderly anti-government protestor reacts during a demonstration demanding the resignation of Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, in Sanaa, Yemen, Saturday, March 26, 2011. The White House urged governments in Syria, Yemen and Bahrain to cease attacks on protesters Friday, while saying the violence against protesters in those countries have not risen to the same level as in Libya, where Western forces are engaged in military action to stop violence perpetrated by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi. Supporters of Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh hold his posters and wave their national flag during a rally supporting Saleh in Sanaa,Yemen, Friday, April 1, 2011. Hundreds of thousands of Yemenis have packed a main square in the capital and are on the march elsewhere across the nation, demanding the country's ruler of 32 years step down.

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More than 1,000 Muslims who fled Myanmar's latest bout of sectarian violence huddled Thursday in a Buddhist monastery guarded by army soldiers as calm returned to this northeastern city, though burned out buildings leveled by Buddhist rioters still smoldered. The army transported terrified Muslim families by the truckload out of a neighborhood in Lashio where overturned cars and motorcycles that had been charred a day earlier left black scars on the red earth. "We heard things could get worse, so we waved down soldiers and asked them for help," said 59-year-old Khin Than, who arrived at the monastery Thursday morning with her four children and sacks of luggage along with several hundred other Muslims. "We left because we're afraid of being attacked." The violence in Lashio this week highlights how anti-Muslim unrest has slowly spread across Myanmar since starting last year in western Rakhine state and hitting the central city of Meikhtila in March. President Thein Sein's government, which inherited power from the military two years ago, has been heavily criticized for failing to contain the violence.

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Early Saturday, a locomotive pulling a 72-car freight train full of crude oil from North Dakota was parked for the night 11 km west of Lac-Megantic, Quebec, the engineer checking into a nearby hotel. Sometime shortly after, the unattended train began to roll away, toward Lac-Megantic -- investigators are still looking for the cause. The crude oil cars, rolling downhill, broke free of the locomotives and picked up speed, derailing at a curve in the center of Lac-Megantic, a lakeside town of about 6,000 people. Six massive explosions followed, sending up huge fireballs and setting dozens of buildings ablaze. Thousands were evacuated, and so far, five deaths have been confirmed. Authorities worry the toll will climb much higher, as more than 40 residents are still listed as missing. Firefighters douse blazes after a freight train loaded with oil derailed in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, on July 6, 2013, sparking explosions that engulfed about 30 buildings in fire. Smoke rises from railway cars that were carrying crude oil after derailing in downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec, on July 6, 2013. A large swath of Lac-Megantic was destroyed after a train carrying crude oil derailed, sparking several explosions and forcing the evacuation of up to 2,000 people. Destruction in Lac-Megantic cuts from the railyard to the waterfront, following a derailment and fire on July 6, 2013.

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view Freight Train Derails and Explodes in Lac-Megantic, Quebec as presented by: The Atlantic


Back in August, 1995, Russian IL-76TD RA-76842 plane was captured by the militants from Taliban movement. Along with the plane an aircrew was also captured (8 people.) And today the story is going to go about this plane. IL-76 was owned by a private airlines from Kazan called Aerostan. The plane was subleased out by the Afghan government and was shipping ammunition supplies en-route Tirana-Sharjah-Kabul. The cargo was conforming with all norms of ICAO and was permitted for shipping. It was not their first flight to Kabul; special radio waves didn’t air any prohibitions or limitations for the flight. Everything was going alright. But over Afghanistan territory, while the plane was 8,000 meters high, it was captured by MIG-21 fighter jet which was owned by Taliban movement. A short time after the plane was forced to land at the airport of Kandahar city. No sooner than a year passed, 378 days if to be exact, before Russian pilots managed to make an outraging runaway; they played upon a silly blunt of security who allowed them to start repairing the plane. They were acting as sharp and consistently as ever: engineers were shutting the loading ramp, a pilot was starting engines and a radio operator was checking radio lines. Behavior or the air crew didn’t attract a bit of security’s attention. Maybe just the loading ramp made them somewhat uneasy. Slowly but firmly they were heading their way to a take-off which was too short. It’s not a fast thing to speed up a huge aircraft with some militants chasing you on a military car. But another capturing didn’t work this time and the plane got off from the last meter of the runway.

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July 16, after a pipeline explosion that led to the leakage of oil into the sea, the Chinese authorities closed the main port in the north of Dalian. W miejscu tym znajduja sie – nalezace do najwiekszych w Chinach – rezerwy ropy. In this place are - of the largest in China - oil reserves. Chinskie sluzby morskie staraja sie zebrac plame ropy zajmujaca prawie 50 km2 . Chinese maritime professionals strive to gather the oil stain dedicated nearly 50 km2. Wedlug wladz, do Morza Zóltego przedostalo sie 1500 ton ropy. According to the authorities, escaped into the Yellow Sea with more than 1,500 tonnes of oil. Z pozarem, do którego doszlo po wybuchu w piatek wieczorem, przez ponad 15 godz. The fire, which took place after the outbreak on Friday evening, over 15 hours. walczylo kilka tysiecy strazaków. Several thousand firefighters fought. Tymczasem w USA, wedlug informacji przedstawicieli koncernu BP, udalo sie opanowac wyciek ropy do Zatoki Meksykanskiej (doszlo do niej w wyniku eksplozji z 20 kwietnia 2010 na platformie Deepwater Horizon). Meanwhile in the U.S., according to representatives of the BP group, was curbed oil spill into the Gulf of Mexico (it was a result of the explosion of 20 April 2010 on the platform of the Deepwater Horizon). Koncern BP poinformowal, ze wyciek ropy do Zatoki Meksykanskiej kosztowal juz firme 3,95 mld USD, co obejmuje powstrzymanie wycieku, oczyszczanie wód zatoki oraz odszkodowania przekazane mieszkancom nadbrzeznych stanów i wladzom federalnym. BP said that spill oil into the Gulf of Mexico has already cost the company 3.95 billion USD, which includes halting the leak, clean waters of the bay and the compensation provided residents of coastal states and federal authorities. The water valve and hoses connected to fire him. Activist in costume holding a globe of death bathed in oil. An American flag hangs in the spot oil off the coast of Alabama.

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Muay Thai boxing, the Thai national sport, has its roots in ancient Thai battles, the fists, knees, elbows and legs turning into weapons. Young boys and men, most who come to the big city of Bangkok from the country, live in small rooms beside the boxing rings, and fight in regional competitions, hoping to become famous and win prize money in the fiercely competitive, brutal modern martial arts sport. Daily training is rigorous and builds physical and character prowess, including values of obedience and respect, attracting boys from five or six years of age.

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It was a scene that perhaps wouldn't have made the final cut of King Kong. This lowland gorilla shares a moment of quiet reflection with a tiny mallard duckling, who seems fairly nonplussed about being in the presence of one of nature's most powerful beasts. The heart-warming image is among Nature's Best Photography Magazine's wildlife photograph winners for 2010. A stunning image of a frolicking bear in the woods and a dramatic scene of a hummingbird facing down a deadly viper were also among the winners of the competition, which received more than 25,000 entries. The awards began with simple yet dynamic goals: to celebrate the beauty and diversity of nature through the art of photography, and to use it as a creative tool for encouraging greater public interest in outdoor enjoyment and conservation. The annual Windland Smith Rice International Awards programme is among the most highly-respected and visually compelling nature photography competitions in the world. The Grand Prize was won by Tom Cairns for his shot of an Osprey grabbing a fish from a lake in southern Finland.

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