Gallery Gate

As the remnants of Hurricane Sandy dissipate over northern Canada, the full scale of the damage left in her wake is becoming apparent. At least 56 people in the U.S. were killed and another 67 in the Caribbean. Cost estimates have ranged as high as $60 billion so far. More than 4 million people remain without power, as crews from across the country converge on the Northeast to restore electricity. Hard-hit sections of New York and New Jersey have begun cleanup, with some restoration of transit and services. The morning commute into Manhattan today was chaotic, as many New Yorkers attempted to return to work by car -- many were turned back due to an order that inbound cars carry at least three people. Collected here are images of Sandy's trail of destruction in New York and New Jersey. A pedestrian surveys fallen trees on top of parked cars in Queens, New York, on October 30, 2012. People embrace after looking through the wreckage of homes devastated by fire and the effects of Hurricane Sandy in Breezy Point. An aerial photo shows the John B. Caddell, a 700-ton water tanker, grounded in New York, on October 31, 2012. The 167-foot tanker ran aground Monday night from the storm surge caused by Hurricane Sandy.

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view Hurricane Sandy: The Aftermath as presented by: The Atlantic


Spanish authorities say 300 people tried to scale the barrier between Morocco and the Spanish enclave of Melilla on Friday morning, with more than 200 making it across. On Thursday, more than 1,000 migrants tried to cross over but were kept back by Moroccan and Spanish forces. The presidents of the Spanish enclaves of Ceuta and Melilla have appealed to the European Union for help. Melilla is feeling the pressure; nearly 2,000 people are currently being keep at the detention centre which should hold less than 500. The Spanish government estimates that 40,000 migrants are currently waiting in Morocco, hoping to get across the fence. Workers set a special net to prevent immigrants from climbing over the border fences between Spain and Morocco at the Spanish enclave of Melilla in northern Africa, 10 March 2014.

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view African migrants storm into Spanish enclave of Melilla as presented by: GigaPica


BP was encouraged early Friday by results from an experimental cap on its busted Gulf of Mexico well, saying everything was holding steady 17 hours into the effort. BP vice president Kent Wells said on a conference call that there was no evidence of a leak in the pipe under the sea floor, one of the main concerns. Wells spoke 17 hours after valves were shut to trap oil inside the cap, a test that could last up to 48 hours. BP finally stopped oil from spewing into the sea Thursday, for the first time since an April 20 explosion on the BP-leased Deepwater Horizon oil rig killed 11 workers and unleashed the spill 5,000 feet beneath the water's surface. But the cap is a temporary measure. Even if it holds, BP needs to plug the gusher with cement and mud deep underground, where the seal will hold more permanently than any cap from above could. Rain falls on oil sheen on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil well leak off the coast of Louisiana Thursday, July 15, 2010. Crew members onboard the Pacific Responder oil skimming vessel prepared to skim oil this morning, but operations were put on standby after lightning was spotted nearby. A munson boat pulling boom passes a transrec machine as it is lifted back onto the deck of the Pacific Responder oil skimming vessel on the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana Thursday, July 15, 2010. The machine vacuums oily water contained by the booms into tanks on the vessel, where it can then be separated. Booms pulled by the Pacific Responder oil skimming vessel contain oil on the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana.

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view Experimental Cap Stops Oil Flowing Into The Gulf as presented by: Sacramento Bee



The crew of the USS Underwood is waiting. Somewhere amid the endless expanse of water that surrounds the U.S. Navy frigate, drug traffickers are speeding millions of dollars of contraband from Latin American shores to the U.S. The ship's mission is to stop at least some of that traffic, which from day to day means spending long hours searching the Western Hemisphere's coasts while preparing for action. Endless duties and drills fill the day, as the crew trains for everything from a terrorist attack to a riot at port. At night, sailors sleep in tiny cubicles so cramped that many can't turn onto their sides. In October, the 30-year-old vessel was patrolling the Caribbean waters off Panama, as part of a multinational effort to hit illicit trafficking routes on both coasts of the Central American isthmus. Since it set sail with a crew of 260 in April 2012, it's visited ports in Panama, Peru, Chile, Colombia, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, the Netherland Antilles and Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. The Underwood is the oldest surface combatant ship in the U.S. Navy but no longer carries guided missiles. In fact, the recent deployment was the Underwood's last voyage, with 10 other U.S. Navy ships scheduled to be decommissioned early next year.

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view Keeping up a Routine aboard the USS Underwood as presented by: Sacramento Bee


AMC’s zombie drama “The Walking Dead” returns for its third season on Sunday, and for cast members who play “walkers” (the zombies), preparing for the role involves careful, professional application of the ugly stick. Last week, David Walters Banks, on assignment for The Wall Street Journal, photographed Xan Angelovich undergoing this transformation by co-executive producer Greg Nicotero and special-effects makeup artist Andy Schoneberg. Ms. Angelovich before make-up. They apply make-up to her teeth. Ms. Angelovich on the set. All photographs by David Walter Banks for The Wall Street Journal.

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view Backstage: The Walking Dead as presented by: Wall Street Journal


With marijuana on the ballot in four U.S. states this November, most prominently California's Proposition 19, which would fully legalize the substance, the legalization of marijuana has become a hot topic of discussion in North America. If pot were to become legal in California, it is unclear how that would affect the ongoing drug wars in neighboring Mexico - whether it would increase, decrease, or have little effect on the widespread violence. What is clear is that U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder has declared that the federal Justice Department will continue to prosecute those who use or distribute recreational marijuana, regardless of any change to state law. Collected here are photos from the past year of marijuana in the news, for both medicinal and recreational purposes, and some of the legal entanglements involved. Drew Brown, a vice president at Abundant Healing store (left), hands over a check to one of his marijuana suppliers on April 19, 2010 in Fort Collins, Colorado. Abundant Healing is one of Colorado's many legal marijuana dispensaries, which sells marijuana to customers with a state-issued medical marijuana card. Marijuana plants lay in a pile before being burned by the army in the Sierra de Juarez in Ensenada, Mexico. Marijuana salesperson Marissa Dodd (left) bags up a sale for a customer at Dr. Reefer's marijuana dispensary April 20, 2010 at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colorado. Colorado, one of 14 states to allow use of medical marijuana, has experienced an explosion in marijuana dispensaries, trade shows and related businesses in the last year as marijuana use becomes more mainstream here.

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view Marijuana as presented by: Boston Big Picture


The country continues to mourn and investigate the loss of 68 people killed on the island of Utoya who were attending a youth summer camp of the country's left-wing Labor Party as well as eight killed by a car bomb in Oslo last Friday. Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik is accused of the shootings and attacks. Over the weekend it was reported that more than 100,00 people gathered in Oslo for a flower vigil to remember the victims. Elizabeth Amundsen,16, cries as hundreds of thousands of people gather at a memorial vigil following Friday's twin extremist attacks, July 25 in Oslo. Anders Behring Breivik, 32, claimed that he has "two more cells" working with him as he appeared in court following a bomb blast at a government building in Oslo and a shooting massacre on nearby Utoya Island that killed at least 76 people in all. The death toll was originally reported as 93. Flowers and candles are seen at a temporary memorial site for the victims of the shooting spree and bomb attack in Norway, on the shore in front of Utoeya island, northwest of Oslo, July 26. Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik is in all likelyhood "insane", his lawyer said after the anti-Islam radical admitted to bomb and shooting spree in Norway on Friday that killed 76 people. A girl holds a flower as she takes part in a march near Utoeya island to pay their respects for the victims of the killing spree and bomb attack in Norway, in the village of Sundvollen, northwest of Oslo, July 26, 2011.

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view The Norway Attacks as presented by: Boston Big Picture


This impressive collection of pictures taken by Joshua Lambus, in Hawaii reveals the colourful creatures that are just a few centimetres in size. They are found in water more than 7,000ft deep, off the coast of Kailua-Kona. Among the 'colour x-ray' style images are pictures of rare squids, jellyfish and shrimp. Joshua Lambus said: "The colours they produce are the naturally reflected colours of their pigmentation." Joshua became a minor celebrity after he photographed a tiny octopus, called a tremoctopus - only the second time the animal had been captured on camera. Joshua Lambus has now been on more than 400 'blackwater' dives. He adds that: "The lack of light and reference is the closest thing I could imagine to being in space."

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view Glowing Deep Sea Creatures Photographed By Joshua Lambus as presented by: Telegraph Media Group



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