Gallery Gate

This series by photographer Vance Jacobs celebrates the "Old Goats" as they call themselves, who despite advancing age (or maybe because of it), swim in the frigid waters of the San Francisco Bay almost daily. The “Goats” are all members of the Dolphin Club in San Francisco and range in age from 65 to upwards of 90. Jacobs is a triathlete who has swum in the bay before, but he can’t imagine swimming in 50-55 degree water without a wetsuit, let alone in the dead of winter or at that age. Jacobs says, “Having done a lot of athletics in my life and having been around a lot of elite athletes in different fields, I’m more impressed by longevity than being able to produce amazing numbers when you’re a teenager or in your early 20's.” Let’s give them a round of applause.

Share/Bookmark

view Meet the Old Goats as presented by: Photo District News


A diver vaulted from the board during warm-ups in the diving portion of the 85th annual Westchester County Swimming and Diving Championships at Sprain Ridge Park in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y., in July. Competitors ranged in age from 10 to 13. Kelly Anne Burns, center, rode atop her husband Mike Smith Rivera’s shoulders during the New York Clown Theater Festival in September. Firefighter Jim Lanigan resuscitated a puppy at the scene of a small apartment fire in Manhattan in July.

Share/Bookmark

view 2010: Greater New York’s Year in Photos as presented by: Wall Street Journal


To claim the ashes of an unclaimed person, call the L.A. County Morgue at (323) 409-7161. The ceremony honoring the unclaimed dead will be at 9:30 a.m. Dec. 10 at the Los Angeles County Cemetery, 3301 E. 1st St., Boyle Heights. Albert Gaskin stands over a ledger in which he maintains a list of individuals who've been cremated at the county crematory. The book contains 1,000 pages, many filled with names of people whose ashes remain unclaimed. L.A. County's cemetery and crematory in Boyle Heights receives about six bodies each day. Each body is given a cremation number, then recorded in a handwritten log.

Share/Bookmark

view Final resting place for L.A. County's unclaimed dead as presented by: Los Angeles Times



An embattled Moamer Kadhafi said he would throw open the country's arsenals to his supporters in a rabble rousing speech that presaged a bloody battle for the Libyan capital. Almost the entire east of the oil-rich north African country has slipped from Kadhafi's control since a popular uprising began with protests in the port city of Benghazi on February 15. A Libyan anti-government protester with her face painted in the colours of Libya's old national flag takes part in a gathering in the eastern city of Benghazi on February 27, 2011. Libyan anti-government protester holds his old national flag in front of a wall covered with graffiti against Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi in the eastern city of Tobruk on February 24, 2011. Some defaced pictures of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi are seen in the southwestern town of Nalut, Libya.

Share/Bookmark

view The Broken Kingdom of Libya as presented by: GigaPica


James Lee's simple plan fell apart in the winter of 2007. The former Marine, who served two tours of duty in Iraq, had moved to rural Independence near Bishop, Calif. Lee was trying to control his wanderlust by living the simple life of a construction worker. His plan dissolved when he happened on a magazine article written by mountain climber turned war correspondent, Ed Darak. "I was never going to stay in Independence long enough to enjoy a simple life," Lee said, "I accepted this fact while reading [the article]." He was 37 years old. "I sold my house and purchased my first camera." Lee said. By January, he was back in Iraq. This time, instead of carrying a gun, the veteran of the Battle of Fallujah was carrying a camera and a notebook. Lee had always gravitated toward Afghanistan. Early in 2010, he embedded with the Afghan Security Forces. He traveled to four provinces in four months. Instead of covering the American mission in Afghanistan as most photojournalists were doing, Lee said he wanted to cover the Afghan people. "If I can't tell the story from the perspective of the Afghans, I don't want to tell the story," he said. And just as he chose a non-traditional path for covering the war in Afghanistan, Lee has also avoided the traditional path to documentary photography. Lee has no formal training in photojournalism. By choice, he remains disconnected from the professional photography world so his images won't look like traditional documentary photography. "It's not about the technique of the camera, it's about the story you're telling," Lee said.

Share/Bookmark

view James Lee in Afghanistan as presented by: Sacramento Bee


The Electric Daisy Carnival, a three-day rave in Las Vegas this weekend, was expected to draw more than 70,000 people each night. The annual music festival previously took place at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, where last summer a 15-year-old girl attending the festival died, spurring scrutiny of the event. The company that produces the festival, Insomniac Productions, subsequently moved the event to Las Vegas. The Electric Daisy Carnival, spread across five stages at the Las Vegas Motor Speedway, features electronic dance music and performance artists. Rave fans like what they hear in a set by DJ David Guetta on Saturday, Night 2 of the Electric Daisy Carnival at Las Vegas Motor Speedway. An umbrella catches the shadow of a performer. This weekend's Electric Daisy Carnival in Vegas is a massive undertaking: a rave as county fair, with rides, a funhouse, fireworks, alcohol and multiple stages for music.

Share/Bookmark

view Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas as presented by: Los Angeles Times


Summer weather brings people together outside to enjoy music festivals, county fairs, carnivals and religious observations. I've gathered here some recent images of these celebrations, including a flaming horseman in Kyrgyzstan, Bastille Day in France, a German fun park inside a former nuclear power plant, and much more. A girl on her father's shoulders looks through a maze of sunflowers growing in a field during a three-day sunflower festival in the town of Nogi, Tochigi prefecture, north of Tokyo, on July 24, 2011. A total of some 200,000 sunflowers welcomed guests for the summer festival, an annual draw for the small town. A monk wearing a mask performs a dance on the first day of two-day festival in Hemis Gompa, 45 km (28 miles) southeast of Leh, on July 10, 2011. The Hemis Gompa is the oldest and biggest monastery in Ladakh. The annual festival celebrates the birth anniversary of Guru Padmasambhava, the founder of Lamaism (an off-shoot of Buddhism) in the eighth century. The two-day festival is marked by ritual dancing in which dancers wear masks representing deities and evil spirits. Roy Johnson, from Etna, California, rides Strawberry Alley for a score of 68, placing him 4th after Thursday night's July 28, 2011 rides at the Last Chance Rodeo in Helena Montana.

Share/Bookmark

view Summer Festivals as presented by: The Atlantic


At age 11, Ghulam was married off to 40-year-old Jaiz in a rural Afghan village, making her only one of more than 10 million young girls who are being forced to wed men old enough to be their fathers or grandfather every year. In an effort to start a global conversation about the devastating effects of early marriages, which are currently practiced in more than 50 developing countries, the United Nations designated October 11 as International Day of the Girl Child this year. To mark the occasion and draw attention to the problem of child brides, photojournalist Stephanie Sinclair teamed up with National Geographic to create a series of heart-breaking photos depicting girls as young as five years old being married off to middle-aged men in countries like India, Yemen and Ethiopia. Child mothers: Asia, a 14-year-old mother, washes her new baby girl at home in Hajjah while her two-year-old daughter plays. Disturbing: Faiz, 40 (left), and Ghulam (right), 11, sit in her home prior to their wedding in the rural Damarda Village, Afghanistan on September 11, 2005. Rock bottom: A young prostitute named China sits stunned after being beat up by a man visiting Kabele Five in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia.

Share/Bookmark

view The Terrifying World Of Child Brides as presented by: Daily Mail Online



view our privacy policy & terms of service