Gallery Gate

Costa Rica fishermen return with their catch as seagulls fly around their boat during sunset in Puntarenas, Costa Rica's Pacific coast near Venado Island March 22, 2006. Competing against large fishing operations, four hundred residents of this small 10-square-kilometer island fish as their only means of income. Indian boys sit on the roof of a house during sunset in the northern Indian city of Jammu May 18, 2005. The sun rises over a Joshua tree in Joshua Tree National Park, California, November 28, 2005. The park includes the high Mojave Desert of southern California and preserves both low and high desert ecosystems within its nearly 800,000 acres.

Share/Bookmark

view 34 Beautiful Sunset Pix as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


BP said Thursday it plans to boost its ability to capture the oil gushing from a ruptured well in the Gulf of Mexico by early next week as the Obama administration announced that the oil giant agreed to speed up payments to people whose livelihoods have been washed away by the spill. At the bottom of the sea, the containment cap on the leaking well is capturing 630,000 gallons a day and pumping it to a ship at the surface, and the amount could nearly double by next week to roughly 1.17 million gallons, the Coast Guard has said. The government has estimated 600,000 to 1.2 million gallons are leaking per day, but a scientist on a task force studying the flow said the actual rate may be between 798,000 gallons and 1.8 million. A second vessel expected to arrive within days should greatly increased capacity. BP also plans to bring in a tanker from the North Sea to help transport oil and an incinerator to burn off some of the crude. Workers use a suction hose to remove oil washed ashore from the Deepwater Horizon spill. Marine reef ecologist Scott Porter works to remove oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill off his hands, Monday, June 7, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico. In this Monday, June 7, 2010 photo, APTN photographer Rich Matthews takes a closer look at oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill, in the Gulf of Mexico south of Venice, La.

Share/Bookmark

view More images from the oil spill as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Three days after a massive earthquake that is now estimated to have registered a 9.0 magnitude, Japanese rescue crews are being joined by foreign aid teams in the search for survivors in the wreckage. Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan has called the disaster nation's worst crisis since World War II, as the incredible scope of the destruction becomes clear and fears mount of a possible nuclear meltdown at a failing power plant. It is still too early for exact numbers, but the estimated death toll may top 10,000 as thousands remain unaccounted for. Gathered here are new images of the destruction and of the search for survivors. A wave approaches Miyako City from the Heigawa estuary in Iwate Prefecture after the magnitude 9.0 earthquake struck the area March 11, 2011. Smoke rises in the distance behind destroyed houses in Kesennuma City in Miyagi Prefecture in northeastern Japan. 11

Share/Bookmark

view Japan Earthquake: Aftermath as presented by: The Atlantic



Dan Winters offers an exclusive view on America’s space shuttles and space exploration through his most recent work, Last Launch, at the Fahey/Klein Gallery in Los Angeles. The exhibition opens tomorrow, July 11 and runs through August 31. With special access, Winters photographed NASA’s Space Shuttle program’s last launches of space shuttles Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavour which took place from February to May of 2011. He takes viewers on exclusive tours inside and outside the shuttle, even placing automatically-controlled cameras around the launch pads.

Share/Bookmark

view A Last Look at Space Shuttles as presented by: Photo District News


Purple is a versatile color. Combining the fire of red with the serenity of blue, it has the ability to soothe as well as excite passion. Purple is prevalent in nature in everything from eggplants to amethysts, and humans have adopted it as a symbol of royalty. Here, snow-covered fir trees appear lilac during sunrise in Germany's Black Forest. The forest is located in southwest Germany, where it is known as Schwarzwald. Streetlights create a play of color on an empty street corner in Arles, a historic city in Provence, France, and the setting of many well-known works by Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh. A close-up shows purple crocuses flecked with bright yellow pollen in Washington, D.C.

Share/Bookmark

view Life in Color: Purple as presented by: National Geographic


On October 15, 1962, a group of CIA analysts assigned to review aerial photographs of Cuba identified several newly established Soviet medium-range ballistic missile installations -- bases within 100 miles of the United States. The State Department was notified that night, and President John F. Kennedy was briefed the next morning, setting in motion a crisis that brought the world frighteningly close to nuclear war. The U.S. considered options, deployed troops and weapons to Florida, confronted the Soviets at the UN, and shortly set up a naval blockade of Cuba. For 13 tense days, the crisis deepened and people around the world feared the very real possibility of a new, horrific worldwide conflict. On October 27, the U.S. and Soviets reached a secret agreement, where Kennedy would order the removal of missiles in southern Italy and Turkey, and Khrushchev would remove all missiles in Cuba. Over the following weeks, U.S. forces monitored the departure of 42 missiles aboard eight Soviet ships, and the crisis was averted. Gathered here are a few glimpses from those tense Cold War days, as the world approached, then retreated from, the brink of destruction.

Share/Bookmark

view 50 Years Ago: The Cuban Missile Crisis as presented by: The Atlantic


Host Neil Patrick Harris and cast members from “Chicago,” “Pippin,” and other Broadway productions rehearsed Thursday at Radio City Music Hall in New York, N.Y., for the 67th Annual Tony Awards, airing live Sunday night. Glenn Weiss and Ricky Kirshner, executive producers of the Tonys, describe the event as an “adrenaline profession” that involves choreographing hundreds of performers in just five weeks between the nominations and the ceremony. The opening number this year will include performers from many of the shows — each show gets “four counts of eight” music bars, said Diane Paulus, director of “Pippin.” Four-time host, Neil Patrick Harris, said this year’s opening performance will be a celebration of Broadway. Photographer Bryan Derballa, on assignment for The Wall Street Journal, visited Thursday’s rehearsal to capture these behind the scenes images.

Share/Bookmark

view Backstage: Rehearsing for the Tony Awards as presented by: Wall Street Journal


oday, San Francisco is one of the top tourist destinations in the world, ranking 33rd out of the 100 most visited cities worldwide, and is renowned for its chilly summer fog, steep rolling hills, eclectic mix of architecture, and its famous landmarks, including the Golden Gate Bridge, cable cars, and Chinatown. Terence Chang loves SF & he proves it by his spectacular photography of the area. Featuring some of his great night / fog / aerial shots of the area & we hope that you like it. Do visit Terence’s Flickr page and check out his work.

Share/Bookmark

view San Francisco: The Cool, Grey City of Love as presented by: Viral Blender



view our privacy policy & terms of service