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Her name is Mireya. She is 3 years and 3 months old. She has fine black hair, a thing for “Handy Manny” cartoons and one of the most prominent last names in Colorado. Many nights, Mireya Salazar will not fall asleep unless her feet are touching her mother and her head is touching her grandmother. It’s part of an elaborate bedtime ritual in which she must place her pillow with the pink checkerboard and butterfly pattern just so, in the middle of the bed. She has other routines, other rules. Every door in the house must be closed. If they are not, she will slam them shut. She won’t eat a broken Cheerio or pasta that is not white. She can seem more interested in a pink balloon than in her father, more fascinated with a blank space in the distance than in “Papa Ken” — her grandfather, Interior Secretary and former U.S. Sen. Ken Salazar. What few baby words she once had are lost. She hums when upset, as if she is sounding an alarm. The fears of her family were confirmed when Mireya was diagnosed with autism, a confounding neurological disorder that affects an estimated one in 110 U.S. children. Hope and Mireya share a moment as they play at the home of Mireya's paternal grandparents in Brighton on Wednesday, March 30, 2011. Hope said she tries to bring Mireya to see her family weekly to keep them involved in Mireya's busy life. Mireya Salazar signs that she is all done to her one-on-one teacher Lorna Cochrane at Firefly Autism on Thursday, March 17, 2011. Mireya, who has yet to develop verbal communication skills, is learning to sign, and in doing so, was directed to point at her desired block rather than grab at it. Salazar began attending Firefly in February after her family researched and decided their one-to-one teacher to student ratio and general practices would best benefit her. Mireya rests her head on aunt Melinda's shoulder after a haircut appointment at the Salazar home on Friday, March 25, 2011. Her grandmother said it is impossible to take Mireya to a salon and found it is easier to bring their stylist to the house.

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view In Focus: Unlocking Mireya’s World as presented by: Denver Post


Ceremonies to mark the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the camp will take place on January 27, with some 300 former Auschwitz prisoners taking part in the commemoration event. The Germans built the Auschwitz camp in 1940 as a place of incarceration for the Poles. From 1942, it became the largest site of extermination of the Jews from Europe. In Auschwitz, the Nazi Germans killed at least 1.1 million people, mainly Jews, but also Poles, Roma, Soviet prisoners of war and prisoners of other ethnicities. On January 27, 1945 the camp was liberated by the Red Army soldiers.

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view Ghosts of Auschwitz as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


NASA's website contains a wealth of amazing photographs. Here is a collection of some of my favorites from NASA's Image of the Day Gallery which can be found on the NASA website here. This image of Mars' moon Phobos was taken by the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on Mars Express. The HRSC camera is operated by the German Aerospace Center and the Mars Express mission is operated by the European Space Agency. The HRSC took this image using the nadir channel on March 7, 2010, on HRSC Orbit 7915. The image has been enhanced to bring out the features in the less illuminated areas. This image from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) shows in great detail a solar prominence taken from a March 30, 2010 eruption. The twisting motion of the material is the most noticeable feature. Launched on Feb. 11, 2010, SDO is the most advanced spacecraft ever designed to study the sun. During its five-year mission, it will examine the sun's magnetic field and also provide a better understanding of the role the sun plays in Earth's atmospheric chemistry and climate. SDO will provide images with clarity 10 times better than high-definition television and will return more comprehensive science data faster than any other solar observing spacecraft. This other worldly landscape is actually Dagze Co, one of many inland lakes in Tibet. In glacial times, the region was considerably wetter, and lakes were correspondingly much larger, as evidenced by the numerous fossil shorelines that circle the lake and attest to the presence of a previously larger, deeper lake. Over millennia changes in climate have resulted in greater aridity of the Tibetan Plateau.

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view NASA's Image of the Day Gallery as presented by: Sacramento Bee



Even though the 2013 Red River flood is not as severe as the National Weather Service initially forecasted, it still made for dramatic images. The river rose from 15 feet just a few weeks ago when the "before" photos in this series were taken, to 33 feet this week.

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view Fargo And Moorhead, Before And During Flooding as presented by: Minnesota Public Radio


From its first launch 30 years ago to its final launch scheduled for next Friday, NASA's Space Shuttle program has seen moments of dizzying inspiration and of crushing disappointment. When next week's launch is complete, the program will have sent up 135 missions, ferrying more than 350 humans and thousands of tons of material and equipment into low Earth orbit. Fourteen astronauts have lost their lives along the way -- the missions have always been risky, the engineering complex, the hazards extreme. As we near the end of the program, I'd like to look back at the past few decades of shuttle development and missions as we await the next steps toward human space flight. Space Shuttle Columbia lifts off from Kennedy Space Center, on April 12, 1981. Commander John Young and pilot Robert Crippen were onboard STS-1, the first orbital flight of the Space Shuttle program. The space shuttle twin solid rocket boosters separate from the orbiter and external tank at an altitude of approximately 24 miles. They descend on parachutes and land in the Atlantic Ocean off the Florida coast, where they are recovered by ships, returned to land, and refurbished for reuse. A technician works on sensors installed in the back end of a scale model of the Space Shuttle in NASA's 10X10 foot wind tunnel, on February 15, 1977.

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view The History of the Space Shuttle as presented by: The Atlantic


The exhibit “Politics in Play” presents three very distinct styles of campaign photography by Damon Winter, Lauren Fleishman, & Ricardo Cases. Looked at side by side, their three approaches can serve as vibrant shorthand for some of the messages, stances, and moods of this election. With his dramatic capturing of shadows and light, Damon conveys the staged aspects of the process. At the other end of the spectrum, Ricardo’s pictures, strobed and super-bright, play on an idealized—even neutralized—vision of America, replete with blue skies, perfect white teeth, and success within reach. And Lauren’s photos, shot in black and white, lend a classic, timeless feel to their unscripted moments. Expectations are in check for November 6th; perhaps, latent in this rich imagery, are portents for that day’s results. – courtesy Anna Van Lenten. Damon Winteris a staff photographer for The New York Times. Lauren Fleishman is a freelance photographer. She followed the 2012 Romney campaign for Time magazine. Ricardo Cases is a freelance photographer who covered the Republican primary in Florida for Time.

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view Politics in Play: Photography in the 2012 Race as presented by: Photo District News


Riots broke out in the North London borough of Tottenham this weekend after a man, Mark Duggan, was shot dead by armed police in an altercation. Protesters marched on the local police station to demand justice before throwing stones and petrol bombs at police and buildings. Last night the rioting spread to other boroughs in London in what the police call copy cat behaviour. We’ve added more images to this gallery. I think we can safely say this is not about the shooting of Mark Duggan anymore, but all about stealing TVs, shoes, clothing and anything else these criminals can get their hands on. Smoke from a fire rises above houses and police officers in Tottenham, north London August 7, 2011. Crowds attacked riot police and set two squad cars alight in north London on Saturday following a protest at the fatal shooting of a man by armed officers earlier in the week. A poster for a betting shop is surrounded by shattered glass after a night of rioting in Tottenham, north London, August 7, 2011. Rioters throwing petrol bombs battled police in a economically deprived district of London overnight, setting patrol cars, buildings and a double-decker bus on fire in some of the worst disorder seen in the capital for recent years. Police officers detain a man in Enfield, north London August 7, 2011. Police said they were called to Enfield, a few miles north of Tottenham, where youths had smashed two shop windows and damaged a police car.

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view The London Riots as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


Photographer and filmmaker, Phil Jackson is also an avid skateboarder, who spends a lot of time in skate parks. His series, “Temporary Autonomous Aggro Zone,” photos of an abandoned building he and his friends are rebuilding into a skate park in Newark, New Jersey, is currently on view through July 27th at Marginal Utility Gallery in Philadelphia. Jackson received his BFA from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, and since then has participated in multiple group exhibitions both domestically and internationally. His annual zine, “Borderline Retarded,” was featured on our Tumblr, PDN’s Promos We Kept.

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view Urban Renewal: Photos of An Abandoned Warehouse Turned Skatepark - See more at: http://potd.pdnonline.com/2014/06/27371#sthash.hfwyqEic.dpuf as presented by: Photo District News



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