Gallery Gate

As the remnants of Hurricane Sandy dissipate over northern Canada, the full scale of the damage left in her wake is becoming apparent. At least 56 people in the U.S. were killed and another 67 in the Caribbean. Cost estimates have ranged as high as $60 billion so far. More than 4 million people remain without power, as crews from across the country converge on the Northeast to restore electricity. Hard-hit sections of New York and New Jersey have begun cleanup, with some restoration of transit and services. The morning commute into Manhattan today was chaotic, as many New Yorkers attempted to return to work by car -- many were turned back due to an order that inbound cars carry at least three people. Collected here are images of Sandy's trail of destruction in New York and New Jersey. A pedestrian surveys fallen trees on top of parked cars in Queens, New York, on October 30, 2012. People embrace after looking through the wreckage of homes devastated by fire and the effects of Hurricane Sandy in Breezy Point. An aerial photo shows the John B. Caddell, a 700-ton water tanker, grounded in New York, on October 31, 2012. The 167-foot tanker ran aground Monday night from the storm surge caused by Hurricane Sandy.

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view Hurricane Sandy: The Aftermath as presented by: The Atlantic


Some soldiers are not only good at military schooling but also at cooking. Today we’ll meet those of them who attend the military school house and become real professionals. The military cook house was created in 1961. Logisticians spend three months on becoming familiar with every detail of kitchenry.

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view Cooking At The Battle Field as presented by: English Russia


This morning I got up early, packed my bag and headed to the San Francisco International airport (SFO) to attend the opening of Virgin America's new Terminal 2 (T2). I was expecting Sir Richard Branson to be there, and I had been told to keep an eye out for some appearance from some element of Virgin's Galactic's program, but I had no idea what I was in for. Shortly before boarding the plane, one of Virgin's PR people announced that we would be making a 20 minute flight over San Francisco, rendezvousing with White Knight 2 and Spaceship 2 inflight, then landing in parallel with the spacecraft. After that, I was just in shock. I did what I could to keep myself collected, which was not an easy task. This was just totally unexpected and amazing. At times, the spaceship was only a couple hundred feet away from us. Sir Richard Branson and California lieutenant governor (and former San Francisco Mayor) Gavin Newsom entering the new terminal.

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view Virgin Galactic's WhiteKnightTwo and SpaceShipTwo at Virgin America's new SFO Terminal as presented by: Boing Boing



Throughout military history, animals have gone to war alongside humans. Millions of horses, mules and donkeys died in World War I, as they carried the soldiers and artillery ammunition to the battle fields of Europe. “There was a great love and loyalty between the soldiers and the animals they worked with,” said registrar Toni M. Kiser, who created the exhibit “Loyal Force: Animals at War” at the National World War II Museum. During World War II, nearly 3,000 horses, provided by the Army Quartermaster Corps, enabled the shore patrol to cover more ground. “The U.S. Coast Guard used more horses than any other branch of the U.S. Military during WWII.” Most supplies and a great deal of artillery were still horse-drawn, and a mounted infantry squadron patrolled about six miles in front of every German infantry division. “These mounted patrol troops were referred to as the ‘eyes and ears of their units.’” The Photos in this post include images from the Civil War to Iraq and Afghanistan. A docile horse wears a gas mask, as a precaution against gas attacks, that was developed by "Our Dumb Friends League," a humane society in London, England, March 27, 1940. The mask might almost be a feed bag, except for the window panes and the enclosed ear muffs. In this photo release by the National Archives via National World War II Museum, Butch, a sentry dog, stands guard over Pfc. Rez P. Hester of the Marine Corps’ 7th War Dog Platoon on Iwo Jima in this undated photograph from the National Archives. The photo will be part of an exhibit, titled "Loyal Force: Animals at War" at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans from July 22-Oct. 17. A Russian man, an evacuee from the Chechen Capital Grozny, reaches out for a final pat of his dog, Jan. 21, 1995. Pets left behind as people flee the war-torn region are forced to fend for themselves. Some 200 people were evacuated from the Grozny area on Saturday, 21 by Russian forces with the Ministry of Emergency Situations. The majority of evacuated were ethnic Russian who had no place to flee during the fighting between Russian and Chechen forces.

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view On War: Animals in War as presented by: Denver Post


Last Saturday was Christmas Day, the day set aside by Christian faithful to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ in Bethlehem over 2,000 years ago. Christianity remains the largest religion in the world, with over 2 billion adherents across the globe. Christmas is celebrated in many ways by those followers, and even more ways by those who enjoy the larger, more secular traditions surrounding the modern holiday. Collected here are some glimpses of this year's Christmas observations and celebrations around the world. Members of the Berlin Seals (Berliner Seehunde) swimming club take a dip in icy Orankesee lake during their traditional Christmas Day ice swim on December 25, 2010 in Berlin, Germany. Club members claim a brief dip inthe chilly waters is healthy and improves blood circulation in the body. A Hindu man has his forehand painted with a message in Hindi "Happy Christmas" on the river banks of the Ganges river on the eve of Christmas, in the northern Indian city of Allahabad. Franky Lewis from Bondi heads out for a surf at Bondi Beach on December 25, 2010 in Sydney, Australia.

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view Christmas Across The Globe as presented by: Boston Big Picture


French oil workers defied the government's demand Monday to get back to work and end fuel shortages, stepping up the fight against President Nicolas Sarkozy's retirement reforms. Youths and truckers joined in, facing off against riot police and creating chaos on the roads. Strikers have blockaded a dozen French refineries and numerous oil depots in the last week as part of widespread protests over Sarkozy's plan to raise the retirement age to 62, a reform the French Senate is voting on Wednesday. Workers are angry because they consider retiring at 60 a pillar of France's hard-won social contract - and fear this is just the first step in eroding their often-envied quality of life. Critics say Sarkozy wants to adopt an "American-style capitalist" system and claim the government could find pension savings elsewhere, such as by raising contributions from employers. People march during a protest in Marseille, southern France, Saturday Oct. 16, 2010. Diesel and jet fuel supplies were running low in parts of France as workers took to the streets for another nationwide protest against President Nicolas Sarkozy's plan to raise the retirement age to 62. Read more: http://blogs.sacbee.com/photos/2010/10/oil-workers-youths-truckers-de.html#ixzz1316GlCo2 Riot police officers detain a youth during a student demonstration. Protestors climbed on a statue during a demonstration in Paris, Saturday, Oct. 16, 2010, with placard reading "Sarkozy scorns the democracy."

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view Oil Workers, Youths, Truckers Defy French Government as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Mission Wolf is a remote wolf sanctuary located 35 miles NorthWest of Walsenburg, Colorado - read lots more at their website. This was an enjoyable (overnight) first stop on our two week Colorado vacation roadtrip. In addition to the pictures below, I have three slide shows of the wolves, wolves w/people, and other misc. pictures. As seen below, you get really close to the wolves!

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view Mission Wolf, Colorado as presented by: Alek Komarnitsky


The issues in Tunisia, Lebanon, and Egypt differ, but yesterday anger boiled over in all three countries as grievances were brought to the streets. In Tunisia, where protests have already overthrown President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, continued demonstrations sought to depose his allies still in their positions. Meanwhile Tunisia's interim government has issued an international arrest warrant for the former president and members of his family. In Lebanon, Sunni supporters of ousted Prime Minister Saad Hariri took to the streets in a "day of rage", burning tires and blockading roads in Tripoli and Sidon. It was in Egypt where the most dramatic events unfolded as the largest protests in a generation rocked Cairo. Demonstrators, many inspired by events in Tunisia, called for an end to nearly 30 years of rule by President Hosni Mubarak. Collected here are photographs from all three countries. Supporters of the Future Movement torch a vehicle belonging to the Arabic language al-Jazeera satellite television station during a demonstration in support of caretaker Prime Minister Saad Hariri in Tripoli. Smoke from tear gas canisters fired by police drifts over central Cairo during protests. Protesters are confronted by riot police as they demonstrate in downtown Cairo, chanting against President Hosni Mubarak and calling for an end to poverty.

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view Protest Spreads in the Middle East as presented by: Boston Big Picture



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