Gallery Gate

Biochemist and photographer Igor Siwanowicz has spent the last five years photographing reptiles and amphibians of all shapes, colours and sizes. Above, a Cranwell's horned frog tries to take a bite out of Igor's finger. A baby chameleon excitedly faces the camera lens with what looks more like a gleeful smile than a threatening grimace. "I followed the development of a bunch of Kinyongia chameleons from being just few weeks old to adulthood," Igor said. "I admire the attitude of the babies of the species - at just an inch in body length they do everything to intimidate you." "Animal's behaviour is not entirely unpredictable so it's always good to devote some time to observation of animal's behaviour prior the session. Some reptiles - especially chameleons - are prone to stress and cannot be handled for too long a time."

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view Reptiles and amphibians photographed by Igor Siwanowicz as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


Boing Boing readers following the violent convulsions of the drug war in Mexico, and fans of the AMC narco-drama Breaking Bad, will likely find these photos from a secret Mexican meth lab to be of interest (particularly in light of the TV show's most recent episode, "Salud.") I can't find Jesse, Mike, Gus, or Heisenberg in any of these photos—but then, these images shot just today are the real thing. Above: a full-face respirator gas mask hangs on a wall above plastic containers at the clandestine drug laboratory discovered in Zapotlanejo, on the outskirts of Guadalajara, September 23, 2011. Soldiers found 133 tons of a drug catalyst used in crystal methamphetamine production (phenylacetic acid, perhaps?) and 180 kg of crystal meth ready for consumption at the laboratory located on a ranch about 38 km (24 miles) east of Guadalajara, according to a local media. The meth is no "Blue Sky," by the looks of it, and the modest gear would look out of place at the Pollos Hermanos superlab. Surely Jesse would not approve of the conditions, and it looks to be below even Don Eladio's standards. But again: this is real life.

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view Inside A Clandestine Mexican Meth Lab as presented by: Boing Boing


People get older every day - that's a given. But everybody deals differently with the process of ageing. In the case of famous people, some carry it with dignity while others go grey kicking and screaming. Many grow fat while a few drink themselves thin, and some people never stop pretending they're still in their early twenties - while behaving accordingly, much to the annoyance (or malicious pleasure) of the audience they force their wrinkled personalities on. Here's a few (mostly Dutch) celebs and their battle against gravity. Most famous Dutch nude model from the eighties and early nineties: Tatjana Simic. Pic on the left is from one of her much desired nude calendars. On the right is how she looks today: like the wife of an Eastern European president. She's taking that body to the pages of Playboy again soon, though. Christina Aguilera is going Adčle on us. Or is she, deep down, really actually a black woman trying to fight her way out? If so: you're doing a good job, Tina.After seeing recent pictures Christina Aguilera, we suspect Mariah Carey has donned a fat suit to follow the trend. Or no, wait. She's in her forties. Finally, she's taking on some all natural body weight.

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view Famous People Versus Gravity as presented by: GigaPica



Residents of the area scorched by the Fourmile Canyon Fire are returning home for the first time since they were evacuated on Monday, September 6th with a warning to be alert to hazards that continue to lurk there. Power lines and poles are down, fire hot spots remain, roads are damaged, phone, water and electricity are unavailable in some areas, abandoned mine shafts have been exposed and some continue to smolder, said Boulder County spokeswoman Barb Halpin. “If they are fortunate enough to have a home standing there are some health and safety issues for them to be aware of,” she said. The fire in the hills west of Boulder that began on Labor Day destroyed 169 structures and forced the evacuation of over 3,000 people. Firefighters have extinguished most active fire within the area, but much of the ground remains hot to the touch. Firefighters continue to rake hot spots to assure they don’t flare up in the future. Tom and Anna Neuer barely escaped the flames surrounding their Gold Hill home after watching their neighbors' homes go up in flames. The two are sure that their home is also gone. Anna covers her face with her hands after Tom mentions the new solar panels that were just installed on their roof that she had not yet thought about. Tom describes driving their van on the left through flames as they made their way down the road away from their home. A sign for firefighters attached to an truck near an old barn along 51st street near the Boulder Reservoir send a heartfelt message out to crews battling the Fourmile Canyon Fire on its fourth day. Over 700 firefighters currently deployed on this fire are staging at the Boulder Reservoir. Multiple agencies from Boulder County including Nederland Fire, Lefthand Fire and Gold Hill Fire responded to a wildland fire in Emerson Gulch near Gold Hill. Crews worked through the night doing initial attack in homes in the Gold Hill area as well as Colorado Mountain Ranch.

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view The Fourmile Canyon Wildfire in Boulder as presented by: Denver Post


This previously seen but still undescribed species of fruit bat endemic to Papua New Guinea was observed by Conservation International?s Rapid Assessment Programme (RAP) researchers in 2009. The Tube-nosed Fruit Bat Nyctimene sp. from the Muller Range mountains does not yet have a name, though it is popularly called Yoda Bat. It is likely restricted (endemic) to hill forests on the island. Fruit bats are important seed dispersers in tropical forests. Goliath bird eating spider (Theraphosa blondi). The largest (by mass) spider in the world, reaching the weight of 170g and leg span of 30cm. Observed by RAP scientists in Guyana in 2006. They live in burrows on the floor of lowland rainforests and despite the name feed primarily on invertebrates (but have been observed eating small mammals, lizards and even venomous snakes). They have venom fangs (not deadly to humans) but their main line of defence are urticating hairs that cover their entire body ? when threatened their rub their legs agains the abdomen and send a cloud of microscopic barbs that lodge in the skin and mucus membranes of the attacker, causing pain and long-lasting irritation. The Satanic Leaf-tailed Gecko (Uroplatus phantasticus). This was observed on a RAP survey in the Mantadia-Zahamena corridor of Madagascar in 1998. (The species was first described in 1888, and it is not rare in primary forest in Madagascar.) The Satanic Leaf Tailed Gecko, is the smallest of 12 species of bizarre looking Leaf-tailed geckos. They are nocturnal, arboreal geckos which exhibit extremely cryptic camouflage and are endemic to Madagascar. They are only found in primary, undisturbed forests, so their populations are very sensitive to habitat destruction. Large Uroplatus species have more teeth than any other living terrestrial vertebrate species. The Leaf-Tailed Gecko is part of the complex cycle of circulating organic matter in the ecosystem. They are predators of small insects and small vertebrates In 2004, WWF listed all of the Uroplatus species on their "Top ten most wanted species list" of animals threatened by illegal wildlife trade, because of it "being captured and sold at alarming rates for the international pet trade".

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view Pinocchio Frog, Et Salamander, Yoda Bat And Dinospider: Species Near Extinction as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


The years leading up to the declaration of war between the Axis and Allied powers in 1939 were tumultuous times for people across the globe. The Great Depression had started a decade before, leaving much of the world unemployed and desperate. Nationalism was sweeping through Germany, and it chafed against the punitive measures of the Versailles Treaty that had ended World War I. China and the Empire of Japan had been at war since Japanese troops invaded Manchuria in 1931. Germany, Italy, and Japan were testing the newly founded League of Nations with multiple invasions and occupations of nearby countries, and felt emboldened when they encountered no meaningful consequences. The Spanish Civil War broke out in 1936, becoming a rehearsal of sorts for the upcoming World War -- Germany and Italy supported the nationalist rebels led by General Francisco Franco, and some 40,000 foreign nationals traveled to Spain to fight in what they saw as the larger war against fascism. In the last few pre-war years, Nazi Germany blazed the path to conflict -- rearming, signing a non-aggression treaty with the USSR, annexing Austria, and invading Czechoslovakia. Meanwhile, the United States passed several Neutrality Acts, trying to avoid foreign entanglements as it reeled from the Depression and the Dust Bowl years. Below is a glimpse of just some of these events leading up to World War II. Adolf Hitler, age 35, on his release from Landesberg Prison, on December 20, 1924. Hitler had been convicted of treason for his role in an attempted coup in 1923 called the Beer Hall Putsch. This photograph was taken shortly after he finished dictating "Mein Kampf" to deputy Rudolf Hess. Eight years later, Hitler would be sworn in as Chancellor of Germany, in 1933. apanese soldiers involved in street fighting in Shanghai, China in 1937. The battle of Shanghai lasted from August through November of 1937, eventually involving nearly one million troops. In the end, Shanghai fell to the Japanese, after over 150,000 casualties combined. Solemnly promising the nation his utmost effort to keep the country neutral, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt is shown as he addressed the nation by radio from the White House in Washington, Sept. 3, 1939. In the years leading up to the war, the U.S. Congress passed several Neutrality Acts, pledging to stay (officially) out of the conflict.

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view World War II: Before the War as presented by: The Atlantic


Lake Bled is a glacial lake that lies in the municipality of Bled, located in northwestern Slovenia. The picture perfect lake features a small island in the middle which is home to the Assumption of Mary Pilgrimage Church. You can often hear the bell of the church ringing, as it is believed that visiting the church to ring its bell brings good luck. The romantic church is a popular place to have a weeding, as is the nearby Bled Castle. Visitors to Lake Bled can enjoy a walk around the lake, try their hand at fishing, or take a swim in its lovely emerald waters in the summer months. There are also ample opportunities for hiking in the nearby Triglav National Park. The closest airport to Bled is the Airport Joze Pucnik Ljubljana, just outside the city of Kranj.

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view Lake Bled, Slovenia as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


A life of panhandling on the streets of Denver is brutal, boring and soul-crushing. Many of those who do it are long-time substance abusers, caught in a vicious cycle: You wouldn’t stand out there 12 hours a day unless you desperately needed heroin, and then only another dose of heroin would get you through another 12 hours. Angel Gamboeck was one of those stuck in that terrible, seemingly endless circle, for much of the past two years in Denver. A young, once-promising girl from the Wisconsin heartland, she ended up here after a failed move West to seek a new life with her boyfriend. Denver Post Photographer Joe Amon walked the streets with Angel in the spring and summer of 2012, witnessing the life of a homeless addict and the challenges of dealing with the drug problem. Angel mixes heroin and water in preparation for shooting up. Most heroin sold on the streets of Denver comes in a tar-like form and needs to be mixed with water in order to be injected. With her lips bright red, Angel stops licking the wounds and lets the blood flow from so many missed attempts at finding a vein in her hand. Angel was shooting up two full bags of heroin and cocaine mixed together under a bridge in Denver. Angel, a homeless heroin addict, flies a sign on the streets in order to support her habit. Angel holds a sign as Denver commuters pass by her corner. "I would say I make at least $80 a day, sometimes more," she says. "Sometimes people give me $100 or $200 was the most I ever got."

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view Heroin in Denver: Angel’s Story as presented by: Denver Post



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