Gallery Gate

Mursi Man, Ethiopia. Photograph by Salvatore Gebbia, My Shot. Omo River Valley, Ethiopia; Folk Festival, Croatia. Photograph by Lola Valenti, My Shot. I took this shot during a folk festival in Istria, Croatia; Parade Participant, Malaysia. Photograph by Philipp Aldrup, My Shot. Every year after the Chinese New Year, the Chinese communities in Johor Bahru, Malaysia, come together for a huge procession in which the deities of the five different dialects are jointly carried through the whole city. Various performances, operas, and rituals are shown over a couple of days.

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view Faces of the World as presented by: National Geographic


This image of the woman in red has become a symbol of the Turkish anti-government protests. Many of the protesters have been women, fighting against repression in the face of a state that they see as trying to take control of their bodies and freedom. A young Turkish woman stands her ground despite being attacked by police using a water cannon. The revolution will be tweeted. A woman protester uses mobile phone to report the latest news about the clashes near Taksim in Istanbul on June 3.

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view Female protesters in Turkey as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


More than 1,000 Muslims who fled Myanmar's latest bout of sectarian violence huddled Thursday in a Buddhist monastery guarded by army soldiers as calm returned to this northeastern city, though burned out buildings leveled by Buddhist rioters still smoldered. The army transported terrified Muslim families by the truckload out of a neighborhood in Lashio where overturned cars and motorcycles that had been charred a day earlier left black scars on the red earth. "We heard things could get worse, so we waved down soldiers and asked them for help," said 59-year-old Khin Than, who arrived at the monastery Thursday morning with her four children and sacks of luggage along with several hundred other Muslims. "We left because we're afraid of being attacked." The violence in Lashio this week highlights how anti-Muslim unrest has slowly spread across Myanmar since starting last year in western Rakhine state and hitting the central city of Meikhtila in March. President Thein Sein's government, which inherited power from the military two years ago, has been heavily criticized for failing to contain the violence.

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view Fearful Myanmar Muslims Shelter in Monastery as presented by: Sacramento Bee



Boing Boing readers following the violent convulsions of the drug war in Mexico, and fans of the AMC narco-drama Breaking Bad, will likely find these photos from a secret Mexican meth lab to be of interest (particularly in light of the TV show's most recent episode, "Salud.") I can't find Jesse, Mike, Gus, or Heisenberg in any of these photos—but then, these images shot just today are the real thing. Above: a full-face respirator gas mask hangs on a wall above plastic containers at the clandestine drug laboratory discovered in Zapotlanejo, on the outskirts of Guadalajara, September 23, 2011. Soldiers found 133 tons of a drug catalyst used in crystal methamphetamine production (phenylacetic acid, perhaps?) and 180 kg of crystal meth ready for consumption at the laboratory located on a ranch about 38 km (24 miles) east of Guadalajara, according to a local media. The meth is no "Blue Sky," by the looks of it, and the modest gear would look out of place at the Pollos Hermanos superlab. Surely Jesse would not approve of the conditions, and it looks to be below even Don Eladio's standards. But again: this is real life.

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view Inside A Clandestine Mexican Meth Lab as presented by: Boing Boing


The issues in Tunisia, Lebanon, and Egypt differ, but yesterday anger boiled over in all three countries as grievances were brought to the streets. In Tunisia, where protests have already overthrown President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, continued demonstrations sought to depose his allies still in their positions. Meanwhile Tunisia's interim government has issued an international arrest warrant for the former president and members of his family. In Lebanon, Sunni supporters of ousted Prime Minister Saad Hariri took to the streets in a "day of rage", burning tires and blockading roads in Tripoli and Sidon. It was in Egypt where the most dramatic events unfolded as the largest protests in a generation rocked Cairo. Demonstrators, many inspired by events in Tunisia, called for an end to nearly 30 years of rule by President Hosni Mubarak. Collected here are photographs from all three countries. Supporters of the Future Movement torch a vehicle belonging to the Arabic language al-Jazeera satellite television station during a demonstration in support of caretaker Prime Minister Saad Hariri in Tripoli. Smoke from tear gas canisters fired by police drifts over central Cairo during protests. Protesters are confronted by riot police as they demonstrate in downtown Cairo, chanting against President Hosni Mubarak and calling for an end to poverty.

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view Protest Spreads in the Middle East as presented by: Boston Big Picture


On their recent mission to kill Osama Bin Laden Team 6 of the US Navy SEALS took along guns, protective gear, nightvision goggles and a whole host of other gadgets to get the job done. They also brought one important instrument that doesn’t run on batteries or bullets, but on dog food. A dog of war. Edy, a military working/patrol explosive detection dog, takes a break after going through an explosive device detection training session at Forward Operating Base Lagman, Afghanistan in this February 18, 2011 photograph. A military working dog outfitted with specialized gear of its own is seen in this undated handout image released by the Canadian company K9 Storm Inc. which manufactures a range of specialized gear that includes high-tech canine flak jackets and tactical body armor used by the U.S. military and other nations. Staff Sgt. Erick Martinez, a military dog handler, uses an over-the-shoulder carry with his dog Argo II in this March 4, 2011 handout image released by the U.S. Air Force, during an exercise at Hill Air Force Base, Utah.

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view Dogs Of War as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


Frustration with the international community has been running particularly high in Afghanistan in recent weeks, following the publicity around a trial of U.S. soldiers charged with murdering Afghan civilians for sport and the burning of a Quran by a Florida pastor. The Quran burning sparked countrywide demonstrations, including a protest in the northern city of Mazar-e-Sharif, in which gunmen stormed a U.N. compound, killing three staffers and four Nepalese guards. In Kabul, a team of suicide bombers tried to breach the front gate at Camp Phoenix, an American military base, said Mohammed Zahir, chief of the criminal investigation division of the Kabul police. One detonated his explosives at the gate of the camp, another managed to get about five yards inside the gate before setting off his device, and the other two were shot and killed by guards before they could enter, he said. Agence France-Presse photographer Peter Parks has been with the soldiers of Camp Phoenix in recent weeks. U.S. Marine Lt. Matthew Minor from Regimental Combat Team 8 shows a photograph on the screen of a digital camera to a young Afghan boy in the town of Musa Qala in Helmand province on April 9, 2011. U.S. Marines from 3rd Battalion 2nd Marine Regimental Combat Team 8 return to Camp Phoenix from a patrol near the town of Musa Qala in Helmand province in southern Afghanistan on April 11, 2011. Afghanistan said recently its forces would take over security in areas including the Helmand capital from NATO this summer, launching a transition as foreign troops plan an exit by the end of 2014. Young Afghan children stand on a dirt road outside the town of Musa Qala in Helmand province.

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view Camp Phoenix, Helmand Province, Afghanistan as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Coal occupies a central position in modern human endeavors. Last year over 7000 megatons were mined worldwide. Powerful, yet dirty and dangerous, use of coal is expanding every year, with 2010 witnessing a production increase of 6.8%. Around 70 countries have recoverable reserves, which some estimates claim will last for over a hundred years at current production levels. Mining for coal is one of the world's most dangerous jobs. While deadliest in China, where thousands of miners die annually, the profession is still hazardous in the West and other regions as well. Our mining and use of coal accounts for a variety of environmental hazards, including the production of more CO2 than any other source. Other concerns include acid rain, groundwater contamination, respiratory issues, and the waste products which contain heavy metals. But our lives as lived today rely heavily on the combustible sedimentary rock. Over 40% of the world's electricity is generated by burning coal, more than from any other source. Chances are that a significant percentage of the electricity you're using to read this blog was generated by burning coal. Gathered here are images of coal extraction, transportation, and the impact on environment and society. The first eight photographs are by Getty photographer Daniel Berehulak, who documented the lives of miners in Jaintia Hills, India. Jimmy Murphy of Sprigg, W.Va. holds a jar filled with well water from his home on November 15, 2010. He says the water was contaminated with coal slurry by Massey Energy and subsidiary Rawl Sales & Processing. Mining company Massey Energy settled a 7-year-old lawsuit with hundreds of southern West Virginia residents who claim the company poisoned their drinking water supplies with coal slurry. Heavy machinery works in the distance at the Kedrovsky open pit coal mine, operated by OAO Kuzbassrazrezugol near Kemerovo, Russia on March 31, 2011. OAO Kuzbassrazrezugol is Russia's second largest coal producer. 0-year-old Anil Basnet sits for a portrait above the coal mine where he works on April 13, 2011 in Jiantia Hills, India. Many workers leave homes in neighboring states, and countries, like Bangladesh and Nepal, hoping to escape poverty and improve their quality of life.

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view Coal as presented by: Boston Big Picture



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