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Yellowstone, the first national park in the world, was established by the U.S. Congress in 1872 and has welcomed millions of visitors in the 139 years since. Last year, Yellowstone recorded its highest number of visitors ever, as some 3.6 million people passed through its gates. Its well-known geothermal features -- geysers, hot springs, and fumaroles -- owe their existence to the massive Yellowstone Caldera, a 45-mile-wide volcanic system beneath the park. Tourists are also drawn to Yellowstone's hundreds of species of wildlife, massive waterfalls, and incredible vistas. Collected below are a few recent views of Yellowstone National Park. A bull elk with velvet still on its antlers grazes near Madison. A bison rubs scratches itself against a fire hydrant to help remove molting fur, outside the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel in Yellowstone National Park, on May 15, 2011. The Grand Prismatic Spring, the largest in the United States and third largest in the world, in Yellowstone National Park.

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view Yellowstone National Park as presented by: The Atlantic


A photography technique that frequently catches my eye is the use of silhouette - placing a subject directly between a primary light source and the camera. The effect can be painterly or haunting or evocative. It can break a subject down to basic ideas conveyed only by line and shape, where an individual might appear iconic. Collected here are a handful of recent photographs from around the world, where we can only see the outlines of the subject, our minds (and the captions) are left to fill in any details in the darkness. Australian freestyle motocross rider Robbie Maddison jumps during an training session in the Sahara desert near the Giza pyramids as the sun sets in Cairo May 11, 2010 in preparation of the second stage of the Red Bull X-Fighters World Tour. Volunteers release flamingo chicks at the Fuente de Piedra natural reserve, near Malaga, in southern Spain August 7, 2010. Around 600 flamingos are ringed and measured before being placed in the lagoon, one of the largest colonies of flamingos in Europe, according to authorities of the natural reserve. South African kids play soccer in open field as sun sets in Soweto, South Africa.

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view In Silhouette as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Yesterday a sporting event was turned into a bloodbath by a person or group who had planted several bombs in the finish area of the Boston marathon. At least 3 people have died and hundreds have been injured. Runners continue to run towards the finish line as an explosion erupts at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.Debris is seen along Boylston Street after explosions went off at the 117th Boston Marathon in Boston. Volunteers organize participants for belongings for collection after two explosions interrupted the running of the Boston Marathon.

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view Boston Marathon Bombings as presented by: Totally Cool Pix



In the moments after the disaster all Port-au-Prince began pouring into twilit streets. Homes, still collapsing, had in a moment become death traps. Camps rose on public and private spaces, squares, parks and golf courses. Bodies were everywhere, laid out under sheets, cardboard or nothing. Dump trucks and front-loaders cleared most in the following weeks. Others were burned. Some are still being found. The bodies have been cleared, but not the estimated 20 million cubic yards of rubble. Mounds of it make most of the capital impassable. Even with 300 trucks working daily, only two percent has been cleared. The number of people in relief camps has nearly doubled to 1.6 million, while the amount of transitional housing built is minuscule. Most of the $3.1 billion pledged for humanitarian aid has paid for field hospitals, plastic tarps, bandages, and food, plus salaries, transportation and upkeep of relief workers. About $1.3 billion went through U.S. relief groups. Hundreds of millions have yet to be spent, with agencies such as the American Red Cross saying they want to avoid dumping money into half-baked projects. Aid workers say the money already spent helped prevent epidemics, floods and political violence, while distributing food and other essentials. Food markets are back to normal, and the foreign doctors and equipment that flowed in have left medical care — while deeply flawed — better than it was before the quake. Most Haitians didn’t have running water and electricity before the quake, and still don’t.

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view In Focus: Haiti Six Months After as presented by: Denver Post


Lake Powell is a man-made reservoir on the Colorado river. Located in the United States between Utah and Arizona, Lake Powell is surrounded by magnificent Navajo sandstone canyon walls in bright oranges, reds, and whites. These striking colors contrast beautifully with Lake Powell’s blue-green waters. Lake Powell is a sprawling, winding lake, and is the second largest man-made lake in the United States. The lake was made when Glen Canyon Dam was constructed in the early 1960s, flooding Glen Canyon. The lake, along with Horseshoe Bend and the notable Rainbow Bridge National Monument rock formation, is now part of the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Visitors to the lake can tour its waters via boat rental or guided tour. Tour operators and lodging can be found in the nearby town of Page in Arizona.

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view Lake Powell, Utah and Arizona, United States as presented by: Beautiful Places To Visit


The seas off China have been hit by their largest ever growth of algae, ocean officials said, with vast waves of green growth washing onto the shores of the Yellow Sea. However, it didn't stop beachgoers from swimming and playing in the green tide in the eastern city of Qingdao. The algae is not toxic nor detrimental to water quality. The State Oceanic Administration said on its website that the algae, enteromorpha prolifera, started to appear a week ago and had spread across an area of 7,500 square miles (28,900 square kilometres). The previous largest bloom was in 2008 when it affected around 13,000 square kilometres, it said.

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view China Hit by Largest Ever Algae Bloom as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


Welcome to Day 2 of Documerica Week on In Focus -- a new photo essay each day, featuring regions of the U.S. covered by the photographers of the Documerica Project in the early 1970s. Today's subject is the American Southwest, including Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Nevada, Utah, and California. The photos depict some of the challenges facing residents at the time: scarce resources, mining operations, growing cities and towns, as well as glimpses of people at work and play in the deserts, mountains and ocean shores. The Documerica Project was put together by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1971, with a primary goal of documenting adverse effects of modern life on the environment, but photographers were also encouraged to record the daily life of ordinary people, capturing a broad snapshot of America. Stay tuned for part 3 of Documerica Week tomorrow, when we travel to the Windy City.

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view America in the 1970s: The Southwest as presented by: The Atlantic


Purple is a versatile color. Combining the fire of red with the serenity of blue, it has the ability to soothe as well as excite passion. Purple is prevalent in nature in everything from eggplants to amethysts, and humans have adopted it as a symbol of royalty. Here, snow-covered fir trees appear lilac during sunrise in Germany's Black Forest. The forest is located in southwest Germany, where it is known as Schwarzwald. Streetlights create a play of color on an empty street corner in Arles, a historic city in Provence, France, and the setting of many well-known works by Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh. A close-up shows purple crocuses flecked with bright yellow pollen in Washington, D.C.

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view Life in Color: Purple as presented by: National Geographic



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