Gallery Gate

One of the most indelible memories in the collective psyche of Americans - and the world - comes from the images of the World Trade Center following the terrorist attacks on the United States, September 11, 2001. Yesterday, Americans and the world collectively remembered those who lost their lives in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania ten years after that unforgettable day. This post (edited by Leanne Burden) shows the transformation, of what became known as Ground Zero, over the last ten years. A memorial rises from the ashes of that day on September 11, 2011. A man stood in the rubble and called out, asking if anyone needed help, after the collapse of the first World Trade Center Tower on Sept. 11, 2001. More than 2,700 people were killed when Al Qaeda terrorists hijacked US passenger jets and flew them into the twin towers in New York. Workers unfolded an American flag on May, 25, 2002, on top of the last standing beam at the site of the World Trade Center disaster in New York a few days before the official end of the recovery effort. Workers laid the cornerstone of the Freedom Tower on the location of the World Trade Center on July 4, 2004.

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view Ground Zero: September 11, 2001 - September 11, 2011 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


It is my JFK moment. I know exactly where I was when I first heard the news that a (small) plane had crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City. That small plane quickly turned into a passenger jet. Quickly followed by another one. The world stopped turning and looked on in amazement. This was no longer a tragic accident, but a well thought out attack on the United States. When reports came in that a thrid plane had crashed into the Pentagon and a fourth plane had crashed into fields in Pennsylvania it became clear this attack had taken months if not years of planning. The question was by whom. The answer to this question depended on who was speaking at the time. Iraq, Afghanistan, the Taliban, the PLO, Libya, all rolled over tongues of people who we thought had the knowledge. We now know that it was Osama Bin Laden and his Al Qaeada terrorist group. The 9/11 attacks were directly responsible for nearly 3,000 deaths and indirectly for hundreds of thousands more through two wars against terrorism (Iraq and Afghanistan) and through different illnesses such as cancer and depression which hit rescue workers and people who helped with the clean up at Ground Zero. The 9/11 attacks changed the world we live in, a change we still feel today when we board a plane, attend a large sporting or musical event and even when we open a newspaper or turn on the TV news. May it never happen again. U.S. President George W. Bush talks with Chief of Staff Andrew Card aboard Air Force One during a flight to Offutt Air Force Base in Omaha, Nebraska in this September 11, 2001 file photo. New York Firefighter John Cleary wipes the soot from his face while taking a break from rescue work at the World Trade Center in New Yorkon September 12, 2001. Clearly helped in the rescue of two trapped Port Authority workers, pulling the first from the rubble at one this morning and helping the second to safety at about four hours later. Rescue workers atop the Pentagon unfurl a U.S. flag outside Washington in this September 12, 2001 file photo.

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view Remembering 9/11: The Tenth Anniversary as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


In the 10 years since the attacks of 9/11, much has changed in the world. Led by the United States, western nations invaded and occupied Afghanistan and later Iraq, removing their rulers and unleashing sectarian violence and insurgencies. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers and civilians have lost their lives at a cost of trillions of dollars, and western military forces remain in both countries. A third war, the War on Terror, has driven changes in the U.S. that have pushed against the limits of what American society will accept in return for security -- measures such as pre-emptive military strikes, indefinite detentions, waterboarding, wiretapping, and invasive airport security systems. As we remember those lost on September 11, 2001, and construction of the new skyscrapers in Manhattan nears completion, most U.S, troops are scheduled to leave Iraq by the end of this year and Afghanistan by 2014. Here is a look at some of the events of the post-9/11 decade, and some of the progress still being made. Mariah Williams, 17, was one of the students inside the classroom at Emma E. Booker Elementary school in Sarasota, Florida, with President George W. Bush on the morning of September 11, 2001 (inset photo). Williams, photographed here in that same classroom on Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2011, was reading aloud to Bush, along with classmates, when then White House Chief of Staff Andrew Card whispered into Bush's ear that a second plane had hit the World Trade Center in New York City. A test of the Tribute in Light rises above lower Manhattan, on September 6, 2011, in New York City. The memorial, sponsored by the Municipal Art Society, will light the sky on the evening of September 11, 2011, in honor of those who died ten years ago in the terror attacks on the United States. One World Trade Center has reached the 80th floor in this aerial photo, on August 30, 2011 in New York City.

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view 9/11: The Decade Since as presented by: The Atlantic


Determined never to forget but perhaps ready to move on, the nation gently handed Sept. 11 over to history Sunday and etched its memory on a new generation. A stark memorial took its place where twin towers once stood, and the names of the lost resounded from children too young to remember terror from a decade ago. In New York, Washington and Pennsylvania, across the United States and the world, people carried out rituals now as familiar as they are heartbreaking: American flags unfurled at the new World Trade Center tower and the Eiffel Tower, and tears shed at the base of the Pentagon and a base in Iraq. It was the 10th time the nation has paused to remember a defining day. In doing so, it closed a decade that produced two wars, deep changes in national security, shifts in everyday life – and, months before it ended, the death at American hands of the elusive terrorist who masterminded the attack. A woman at the National September 11 Memorial, Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011, mourns the loss of her son who died during attacks at the World Trade Center, Sept. 11, 2001. Hikers unfurl a large flag on the top of Peak One of the Ten Mile Range outside of Frisco, Colo., Sept. 11, 2011. The Sunday following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, several dozen friends climbed the peak to raise an American flag, and on Sunday, many of the same group made a return trek. Dawn breaks over ground zero in lower Manhattan on Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011. The two memorial fountains, among the largest artificial waterfalls in the world, sit where the twin towers stood.

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view Captured: Remembering 9/11 as presented by: Denver Post


10 years ago, on Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists seized control of four airplanes and crashed them all, bringing down the World Trade Center towers and ripping a hole in the Pentagon. Throughout this anniversary day, the editors at Photo Journal will be live blogging the memorial ceremonies and worldwide reactions through a curated series of photographs. The images are posted as they become available and do not necessarily represent the time they were taken. The historical photos you see are juxtaposed with images from today. Robert Peraza, who lost his son Robert David Peraza, pauses at his son's name at the North Pool of the 9/11 Memorial on September 11, 2011, in New York. Police officers from the United Kingdom march across the Brooklyn Bridge on the morning of the 10 year anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. A man wearing a fireman's hat stands while an American flag covers the field during a ceremony before a game between the Buffalo Bills and the Kansas City Chiefs at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri on the tenth anniversary of the attacks of September 11, 2001.

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view A Decade After 9/11 in Photos as presented by: Wall Street Journal


Ten years ago, 19 men trained by al-Qaeda carried out a coordinated terrorist attack on the United States that had been planned for years. The attackers simultaneously hijacked four large passenger aircraft with the intention of crashing them into major landmarks in the United States, inflicting as much death and destruction as possible. Three of the planes struck their targets; the fourth crashed into a field in Pennsylvania. In a single day, these deliberate acts of mass murder killed nearly 3,000 human beings from 57 countries. More than 400 of the dead were first responders, including New York City firefighters, police officers, and EMTs. It was one of the most-covered media events of all time, and after a decade, the images are still difficult to view. These attacks and the global reaction to them have profoundly shaped the world we live in, so it remains important to see the images and remember just what happened on that dark day. Moments after United Airlines Flight 175, with 56 passengers (including the 5 hijackers) and 9 crew members, struck the South Tower of the World Trade Center between floors 77 and 85 on September 11, 2001, in New York City. Two women hold each other as they watch the World Trade Center burn following a terrorist attack on the twin skyscrapers in New York City. Police and pedestrians run for cover during the collapse of the World Trade Center South Tower

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view 9/11: The Day of the Attacks as presented by: The Atlantic


a Fire Helmet belonging to Chief Joseph Pfeifer. This object is now part of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York. More photos, and stories about those objects, below (source: REUTERS). A related news item about the museum is here. Joseph Pfiefer, the battalion chief of Engine 7, Ladder 1, was on a routine call in downtown Manhattan when he heard the roar of American Airlines Flight 11 passing overhead on course for the North Tower of the World Trade Center. His unit was one of the first to arrive at the scene, and he set up a command center in the North Tower's lobby. That day, he was being followed by two French filmmaker brothers, Jules and Gedeon Naudet, and their footage from the scene shows Pfiefer's brother Kevin, also a firefighter in a different unit, preparing to head upstairs for the unfolding rescue mission. When the South Tower collapsed, Pfiefer radioed evacuation orders to his officers in the North Tower. Pfiefer, along with the rest of Ladder 1, survived that day. His brother did not. The museum, which occupies seven stories below the ground of the World Trade Center site--is still being built at the site of the fallen towers. It is due only to open in 2012, on the 11th anniversary of the attacks. Blood-stained shoes worn by Linda Lopez as she evacuated from the 97th Floor of Tower 2 on September 11, 2001. She was at work at the Fiduciary Trust Company on the South Tower's 97th floor when the first plane crashed into North Tower, sending a fireball past their window and radiating a heat that she said felt like being sunburned. A recovered FDNY Squad 252 helmet belonging to deceased FDNY member Kevin M. Prior is seen in this photograph before becoming a part of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York August 22, 2011. Kevin Prior, a firefighter with Brooklyn's Squad 252, can be seen in video footage of the North Tower lobby recorded after the first plane hit getting ready to go upstairs. Responding to a mayday call sent out by fellow firefighters encountering breathing problems, he and five other members of the squad are thought to have been on a floor in the 20s when the tower collapsed.

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view September 11: Found artifacts at the 9/11 Museum as presented by: Boing Boing


The attacks of September 11th, 2001 came as a huge surprise, shocking the world and immediately dominating the news around the world. Ten years later, the reverberations from that shock and the varying reactions to it continue to affect nearly everyone in ways large and small. While most people remember where they were on that day, it can be difficult to recall what else was happening in the days just before. I thought it would be interesting to go through the newswires and find photos of events taking place around the world during the week of September 3 to September 10, 2001. Some of the photos are directly related to the upcoming attacks, or the fallout that resulted, many have nothing at all to do with the attacks, but simply show glimpses of what was happening at that time. Gathered here is a time capsule of images taken during this week of September, one decade ago, before everything changed. Crowds fill Arthur Ashe Stadium prior to the men's final at the U.S. Open Tennis Championship in New York, on September 9, 2001. A satellite image of the Pentagon Building near Washington, D.C., taken on September 7, 2001 by the IKONOS satellite. Four days later, American Airlines Flight 77 would be crashed into the western wall (top right in this photo), killing 189 aboard the flight and on the ground. A view of the New York City skyline with the World Trade Center at sunset taken from the US Open at the UATA National Tennis Center in Flushing, New York, on September 5, 2001.

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view 9/11: The Week Before as presented by: The Atlantic


Mangled steel and incinerated fire trucks destined for the National September 11 Memorial and Museum are now being stored at Hangar 17 at JFK Airport. Here’s a look at the artifacts. Hangar 17 at the JFK Airport is temporary home for artifacts from the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks that will eventually reside at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum. Partially incinerated vehicles include police cruisers and a fire truck, shown here. A New York City taxi cab with a collapsed roof. The mangled facade that stood directly above and below where American Airlines Flight 11 struck the World Trade Center, known as the “North Tower Impact Steel.” A damaged fire truck.

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view 9/11 Artifacts at JFK Airport as presented by: Wall Street Journal



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