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As the search for missing persons in the aftermath of a massive mudslide in Washington enters its second week, some searchers will be taking a much-needed break. Rescue dogs, who have been essential in the search for victims of the mudslide that hit Oso, Wash., on March 22, will be getting some rest after working long hours in the cold and rain, rescue crews said Sunday. The dogs can lose their sensing ability if overworked, officials said, according to the Associated Press. ďThe conditions on the slide field are difficult, so this is just a time to take care of the dogs,Ē said Kris Rietmann, a spokeswoman for the team working on the eastern portion of the slide. Dogs from the Federal Emergency Management Agency that arrived more recently will continue working, said Heidi Amrine, another spokeswoman for the operation. Late Saturday, authorities revised the number of people believed to be missing from 90 to 30, while the official death toll edged up to 21. Below, a look at some of the search and rescue dogs at the site.

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view Meet the Washington Mudslide Rescue Dogs as presented by: Wall Street Journal


On their recent mission to kill Osama Bin Laden Team 6 of the US Navy SEALS took along guns, protective gear, nightvision goggles and a whole host of other gadgets to get the job done. They also brought one important instrument that doesnít run on batteries or bullets, but on dog food. A dog of war. Edy, a military working/patrol explosive detection dog, takes a break after going through an explosive device detection training session at Forward Operating Base Lagman, Afghanistan in this February 18, 2011 photograph. A military working dog outfitted with specialized gear of its own is seen in this undated handout image released by the Canadian company K9 Storm Inc. which manufactures a range of specialized gear that includes high-tech canine flak jackets and tactical body armor used by the U.S. military and other nations. Staff Sgt. Erick Martinez, a military dog handler, uses an over-the-shoulder carry with his dog Argo II in this March 4, 2011 handout image released by the U.S. Air Force, during an exercise at Hill Air Force Base, Utah.

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view Dogs Of War as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


On Tuesday, March 15th, musher John Baker crossed the finish line in Nome, Alaska, to win the 2011 Iditarod Sled Dog Race. Baker won in record time, becoming the first native Alaskan champion since 1976. Dog sledding season is now winding down, but over the past few months dozens of races have taken place across the northern hemisphere from Spain to Alaska, including La Grande Odyssee, Finnmarkslopet, and Yukon Quest. Gathered here are some highlights from many of these races, including the Iditarod, where 14 teams are still on the course, nearing the end of their 1,150-mile journey. Iditarod musher Karin Hendrickson's swing dog Aberdeen and leader Chase keep an eye on things at the Takotna checkpoint during the 2011 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on Wednesday, afternoon March 9, 2011. Iditarod musher Peter Kaiser, from Bethel, Alaska, races from Safety to the Nome, Alaska finish line of the 2011 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Doug Butler of Bristol, Vermont, drives his dog team during the open class of the Laconia World Championship Sled Dog Race Saturday, Feb. 12, 2011, in Laconia, New Hampshire.

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view The 2011 Iditarod Sled Dog Race as presented by: The Atlantic


We hope you donít mind to visit the Regional Center of Dog Service belonging to the Main Department of Internal Affairs. The first center of police tracker dogs appeared in St. Petersburg in 1909 and later it became the first cynological department of the Ministry of the Interior. But this time we are invited to the center of the Moscow Region. The center has 240 enclosures where they keep 120 dogs. 40% of cynologists are women. The enclosures are clean and neat. Some dog hotels look worse. In winter they are covered with greatcoat cloth and laid with straw. The main breed here - German shepherd. These dogs are better adapted to the Russian climate. However they also have Labradors and Rottweilers. Each day a dog is given one kilogram of by-products and 600 grams of cereals. But basically they use American dry feed PRO PAC. The company has won the tender this year and offered the best price. And now the performance part. Though it is not very impressive. The dogs do not bite with all their jaws, donít jump from a distance, tear before they get an order. They understand that such detention may result in serious injuries, some kind of inheritance of the Soviet times. By the way, there are no universal dogs - drugs, explosives, tracking, patrolling. When a dog finds an explosive it makes a signal. It tries to show the place with its paws. The dogs trained to find weapons define the smell of powder and gun oil. In theory a dog can work with any cynologist but in practice - only with an owner. This one is a personal dog. They say that in Germany dogs are medalled but in Russia they are only special tools and donít get rewards. German dogs are retired to have warm existence in their old age, Russian dogs may only hope to be taken to someoneís house.

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view Military Working Dogs as presented by: English Russia


Second Annual Surf City Surf Dog competition was held at Surf City USA on Sunday, September 19, 2010. Dogs and owners were able to compete in a variety of events while raising money for animal welfare organizations, according to event officials. Dogs could compete in either a GROMS heat - which involved small, medium, large or extra large dog surfing heats, or the SHREDDER division where dogs were judged on a variety of skills, including, the length of their ride, the size of the wave and their confidence on the board. A surf dog prepares to ride a wave to the beach during the annual Surf City Surf Dog competition at Huntington Beach in California. Surf dog Nani rides a wave to the beach during the annual Surf City Surf Dog competition at Huntington Beach. A surfer dog wipes out as he rides a wave to the beach during the annual Surf City Surf Dog competition at Huntington Beach.

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view Surf City Surf Dog Competition as presented by: Sacramento Bee


In Afghanistan -- as in military conflicts going back centuries -- dogs play myriad roles, from companions and pets to scouts and, increasingly, living, breathing land mine and IED (improvised explosive device) detectors. Sgt. John Barton of the 4th Brigade of the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division greets his platoon's pet dog, Ray-Ray, at combat outpost Impala in Bala Murghab, Afghanistan. Corporal Dave Heyhoe, of the British Army Theatre Military Working Dog Support Unit, and his dog Treo and Royal Army Veterinary Corp Lance Cpl. Marianne Hay, and her arms and explosive search dog, Leanna, rest in the village of Segera, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan. Marines of 3rd Battalion, 6th Marines, give cereal to a stray puppy in northern Marjah, Helmand province, southern Afghanistan.

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view Afghanistan: Dogs of War as presented by: Life Magazine


While I live in Suburbia, there are some trails and farmlands nearby that make for enjoyable walks and misc. nature viewing. One night, my wife Wendy took my oldest son Dirk to the library and called us on her Cell Phone, saying she had seen a large bird in a Cottonwood Tree nest that is nearby. So 7-year old Kyle and I decided to walk over to check it out. I grabbed my Canon 40D with the 55-250 telephoto lens ... while Kyle carried the tripod which he decided was a "bazooka" and proceeded to shoot everything in sight! So we get to the Cottonwood tree and there is no bird in the nest. We look from various angles but zippo - must have flown away. I suggest to Kyle that we bushwhack to the next grove of trees because a few days earlier, my Mom had noticed a nest with a bird nearby. We walk over there and once again, we are skunked - no birds. Heck, there's hardly anything flying around and I'm kinda bummed, since it is 6:40PM and the light is beautiful from the setting sun ... and then ... I catch a fleeting glimpse of something moving through the brush ahead. And when I follow it over the top of a rise, guess who is keeping an eye on me!

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view Farm Dog versus Wile E. Coyote as presented by: Alek Komarnitsky



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