Gallery Gate

One year ago, record-breaking floods submerged one fifth of Pakistan's total land area for months, affecting some 20 million residents and causing some $10 billion in damage. Eleven million Pakistanis were left homeless, and the aid organization Oxfam estimates that more than 800,000 remain without permanent shelter to this day. Many of them, frustrated by limited government assistance, are struggling to rebuild their own homes. Reuters photographer Adrees Latif was in Pakistan one year ago to record the disaster and has just returned to recreate some of his most iconic images. His then-and-now photos reveal what has changed (and what has not) over the course of a year. Collected below are photos from Latif and others that show how Pakistanis continue to cope with last year's disaster. A Pakistani family crosses the River Swat by bridge at the hill station of Madyan, on July 20, 2011. A year after floods swept away homes and livelihoods, Pakistani survivors of a Taliban uprising are courting fresh disaster in the picturesque Swat valley by refusing to leave for higher ground. In this image taken a year ago, on August 7, 2010, marooned flood victims, including Mohammed Farhan, aged about 12, and Allah Dita, aged about 64, look to escape by grabbing onto the side bars of a hovering army helicopter which arrived to the village of Daya Chokha Gharbi to distribute cooked chick peas and rice to flood victims in Kot Adu. Now, on July 29, 2011, Mohammed Farhan, (left) and Allah Dita, pose for a portrait with residents from the village of Daya Chokha Gharbi while standing a top the same cemetery they tried to escape flood waters by hanging onto an army helicopter last year. "All I was thinking was to save my life. To get out," said Dita, when asked what he was thinking while holding onto the side bars one year earlier. Dita, who had stayed behind to look after his house and livestock, managed to be pulled up into the helicopter and was reunited with his five children who had left the flooded village a few days earlier.

Share/Bookmark

view Pakistan Floods, One Year Later as presented by: The Atlantic


Huge parts of China have been affected by some of the worst drought conditions in decades. Fishermen, farmers, and wildlife have been enduring hardships for months now. In an effort to alleviate the crisis, China's Three Gorges Dam has been discharging water to the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River. However, since early June, a series of torrential rainstorms has been pounding southern China, overwhelming parched farmlands and triggering some of the worst flooding since 1955. So far, 175 have been reported dead and 86 missing. Chinese officials say they plan to double investments in water conservation projects, as the country deals with a shortage of 40 billion cubic meters of water each year. Gathered below are recent images from China, a nation that has been coping first with too little water, then with far too much. A farmer squats in a dried-up pool in Huangpi district of Wuhan, central China's Hubei province. A paramilitary policeman walks on a bridge in the flood-hit Wangmo county, Guizhou province June 6, 2011. In the southwest province of Guizhou, the easing of drought swung to flooding that killed 9 people and left 13 missing in Wangmo County. Torrential rains there overwhelmed the local river and flooded the county seat and other towns, forcing 6,000 people to leave, Xinhua news agency reported. A boat is seen stranded on the cracked bed of a dried area of Xieshan, which is part of Poyang Lake in east China's Jiangxi Province.

Share/Bookmark

view Floods Follow Drought in China as presented by: The Atlantic


More than 40 miles of dikes are in danger of overflowing in an eastern Chinese province where floods have caused $1.2 billion in losses, authorities said Monday as the country neared a critical point in battling seasonal rains. Heavy rains pounded Zhejiang province over the weekend, and the level of a river that passes through Lanxi city has risen sharply, said Zhao Fayuan, deputy director of the provincial flood control headquarters. The level of Lanjiang river has now hit 110 feet (34 meters), the highest since 1966, the headquarters said. Recent flooding has destroyed 600,000 acres (241,600 hectares) of farmland and caused 1,846 companies to stop production in Zhejiang, incurring 7.69 billion yuan ($1.19 billion) in direct economic losses, the flood control agency said. Of these, 3.4 billion yuan were agricultural losses. Residents walk past houses destroyed by a landslide triggered by torrential rain in Zhanqiao township of Linxiang city in south China's Hunan province. A man on a motor scooter makes his way through floodwater in Yingtan, east China's Jiangxi Province on June 19, 2011. A man tries to hold up a woman after stepping into a drain while attempting to walk through flood waters in southwestern China's Chongqing Municipality on Friday, June 17, 2011.

Share/Bookmark

view Flooding in China Continues as Dikes Near Overflowing as presented by: Sacramento Bee


To take pressure off levees near Baton Rouge and New Orleans, engineers have opened two major spillways. After water was released over the weekend at the Morganza spillway near Baton Rouge, deputies and National Guardsmen fanned out to warn residents in its path, most of whom have heeded the call to seek higher ground. Snow melt and rain have sent a relentless torrent of water down the Mississippi this spring. On Monday, President Barack Obama flew to Memphis, Tenn., to comfort families affected when the river rose last week to within inches of the record set in 1937. Some low-lying neighborhoods were inundated, but levees protected much of the rest. Downriver in Mississippi and Louisiana, the crews keeping watch on floodwalls and levees included those from the Army Corps of Engineers, various local levee districts, county sheriffs, municipal police forces and private security details. A home is nearly covered with floodwater May 12, 2011 in Vicksburg, Mississippi. The Mississippi river at Vicksburg is expected to crest at a record 58.5 feet. Heavy rains have left the ground saturated, rivers swollen, and have caused widespread flooding in Mississippi, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Arkansas. flood gauge is posted by the road in front of a home May 15, 2011 in Butte LaRose, Louisiana. If the water reaches the flood stage of 27 feet, as predicted, it will be more than half way up the nearby homes. Most of the residents of the small town of Butte LaRose are packing their possessions or moving their entire homes because the town is expected to be severely flooded after the Army Corps of Engineers opened the Morganza spillway to divert floodwater down the Atchafalaya River and away from the cities of New Orleans and Baton Rouge. Brenda Hynum, left, hugs her daughter Debra Emery as she watches floodwaters rise around her mobile home in Vicksburg, Miss., Monday, May 16, 2011. A sand berm they built around their trailer failed in the night and floodwaters from the rising Mississippi river rushed in. "We tried so hard to stop it. It goes from anger to utter disbelief that this could happen. I just want to go home." Emery said.

Share/Bookmark

view Captured: Mississippi Flooding as presented by: Denver Post


For weeks, the flooding in eastern Australia has been a slow-motion disaster, with drenching rain devastating wide swaths of farmland and small towns. Now, rivers are rising in Brisbane, the country’s third-largest city, forcing people to flee both suburbs and skyscrapers. Flooding that has unfolded since late November across the waterlogged state of Queensland turned suddenly violent Monday, with a cloudburst sending a raging torrent down the Lockyer Valley west of Brisbane. Hundreds had to be rescued by helicopter Tuesday. Residents use boats to travel down the road after the swollen Fitzroy River broke its banks and flooded the city of Rockhampton on January 5, 2011. Tens of thousands of people in Rockhampton braced for complete isolation as waters, which have inundated an area bigger than France and Germany and closed the town's airport and railway, lapped at the last remaining road link. This image taken on January 10, 2011 shows flood waters swamping the shopping centre in the city of Toowoomba. Australia braced for a rapidly rising death toll on January 11 after flash floods killed eight and left 72 missing, as a quickly spreading flood disaster forced evacuations in central Brisbane. In this Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011 photo, an island is formed by flood water stranding vehicles and other equipment in Rockhampton, Australia. Floods that have cut air, rail and road links to an Australian coastal city are now threatening its sewage plant, and waters are still expected to rise another few feet before peaking Wednesday.

Share/Bookmark

view Captured: Flooding in Australia as presented by: Denver Post


On Monday, October 4th, a large reservoir filled with toxic red sludge in western Hungary ruptured, releasing approximately 700,000 cubic meters (185 million gallons) of stinking caustic mud, which killed many animals, at least four people, and injured over 120 - many with chemical burns. The 12-foot-high flood of sludge inundated several towns, sweeping cars off the road as it flowed into the nearby Marcal River. Emergency workers rushed to pour 1,000 tons of plaster into the Marcal River in an attempt to bind the sludge and keep it from flowing on to the Danube some 45 miles away. The red sludge in the reservoir is a byproduct of refining bauxite into alumina, which took place at an alumina plant run by the Hungarian Alumina Production and Trading Company. A criminal probe has just been opened by Hungarian authorities. A Greenpeace activist takes a sample of the toxic sludge in a town near Ajkai. Hungarian Army soldier wearing a chemical protection outfit cleans a street of Devecser. Janos Kis (left) and Tunde Erdelyi look at their home flooded by toxic mud in the town of Devecser, Hungary.

Share/Bookmark

view A Flood Of Toxic Sludge as presented by: Boston Big Picture


The United Nations has now estimated that Pakistan will need billions of dollars to recover from its worst floods in 80 years - further straining a country already dependent on foreign aid to prop up its economy and back its war against Islamist militants. Over 60,000 troops are involved in flood relief operations trying to assist nearly 14 million people who are now affected by the flooding. The U.N. has just launched an appeal for $459 million in immediate aid, as Pakistanis have become more frustrated with their government's response and President Asif Ali Zardari's trip to Europe. [This entry is part II of a double-issue today, part I about Russia here] Collected here are recent photographs of Pakistanis as they continue to cope with their flooded country. A man wades through flood waters towards a naval boat while evacuating his children in Sukkur, located in Pakistan's Sindh province. A man marooned by flood waters, alongside his livestock, waves towards an Army helicopter for relief handouts in the Rajanpur district of Pakistan's Punjab. Pakistani flood victim Mohammed Nawaz hangs onto a moving raft as he is rescued by the Pakistan Navy.

Share/Bookmark

view Continuing Pakistani Floods as presented by: Boston Big Picture


More than 400 people have died and thousands of others were made homeless as some of the worst floods in Pakistan's history hit this northwestern region, provincial officials said. Hundreds of thousands of people were believed to be unable to evacuate to safer ground while the authorities struggled to reach the worst-affected areas, officials said. The information minister for the Khyber-Pakhtunkwa province, Mian Iftikhar Hussain, put the death toll at 408 in the flooding that followed two days of record rainfall. The region used to be known as the North-West Frontier Province. Hussain warned that the death toll could rise because many towns and villages remained inaccessible, and telecommunication infrastructure had been damaged. Much of the province has been cut off from the rest of the country. Floodwaters have either inundated or damaged all roads and railroad tracks. "This is the worst ever calamity in our history," Hussain said at a news conference. "Whatever that had survived terrorist bombings have been washed away by the floods." Pakistani villagers try to catch trees floating in the flooded Nelum river in Muzaffarabad, the capital of Pakistani Kashmir. Pakistani local residents use a rope to flee from rising waters in a flood-hit area of Nowshera.

Share/Bookmark

view Flooding Devastates Pakistan's Northwestern Region as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Weather forecasters have warned of a fresh onslaught of downpours across southern China, which has already been battered by floods and landslides that have killed more than 200 people. The disaster, which has hit 10 provinces or regions, has caused an estimated 43 billion yuan (more than four billion pounds) of economic losses and displaced 2.4 million people. Thousands of soldiers have been dispatched to flood-hit areas to help in rescue and evacuation work. Troops have been seen struggling up soaked hills with food supplies to help residents stuck in their villages and carrying rowing boats to areas submerged in brown, muddy water. Alternating floods and droughts have plagued China's people for millennia. The current floods are among the worst in south China since 1998, when over 3,600 people were killed and more than 20 million displaced. Large flood-hit areas of southern and southwestern China, particularly Guizhou, Guangxi and Chongqing, had only just recently emerged from a crippling drought that in some regions was the worst in a century.

Share/Bookmark

view China Floods: Hundreds Killed And Thousands Displaced By Deadly Flooding as presented by: Telegraph Media Group


Spring floodwaters are wreaking havoc in many locations around the world this month. The most disasterous flooding came on Wednesday in France when flash floods hit the back hills of the French Riviera and turned streets into rivers of surging, muddy water. The death toll from the flooding has risen to 25. In Myanmar and Bangladesh, floods and landslides triggered by incessant monsoon rains have killed more than 100 people, officials said Thursday. In the United States, flooding in Texas, Nebraska and Wyoming has caused massive damage to farms and homes. A man takes pictures of piled up cars in Draguignan, southern France, Wednesday June 16, 2010. Regional authorities in southeastern France say more than a dozen people have been killed and many are missing in the aftermath of flash floods that followed powerful rainstorms. Unusually heavy rains recently in the Var region have transformed streets into muddy rivers that swept up trees, cars and other objects. A railroad bridge is down over the Elkhorn River near Norfolk, Neb., Wednesday, June 16, 2010. The swollen Elkhorn River crested two inches short of a levee protecting Norfolk, preventing further disaster as emergency workers Wednesday continued their search for a man who fell into the raging river after the bridge collapsed outside of town a day earlier. Buses from Rockin' "R" River Rides lie on their sides, Wednesday June 9, 2010 wrapped around trees along the banks of the Guadalupe River in the Gruene Historic District in New Braunfels, Texas. The Gaudalupe River in the area is a popular water recreation destination known for inner tube float trips.

Share/Bookmark

view Spring Floods Around The Globe as presented by: Sacramento Bee


Over the past month, heavy rainfall from different storms across parts of Europe has caused massive amounts of flooding - some water moving slowly across river plains and farmland, some moving swiftly through cities and villages. Dozens have lost their lives, many thousands evacuated their homes, some repeatedly - Poland in particular is suffering its worst flooding in decades. More recently, parts of Spain and France have experienced flash floods that have carried away people and vehicles. Collected here are some images of the flooding in Europe from the past several weeks. Residents walk through a flooded street in Felsozsolca, Hungary. Cyclists ride through the flooded Danube River in Budapest, Hungary on June 7,2010. The Parliament building sits in the background. A man sits with his dog on a ledge on the upper floor of his home surrounded by flood water on the outskirts of the town of Sandomierz, south east Poland.

Share/Bookmark

view European flooding as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Last weekend, powerful thunderstorms drenched Tennessee, Kentucky and Mississippi, dumping over 13 inches of rain on the region in two days. Creeks, lakes and rivers swelled with the rainwater, overflowing their banks, washing away roads, and causing the deaths of at least 24 people so far. The Cumberland River, which winds through downtown Nashville, Tennessee, crested Monday at 51.9 feet, 12 feet above flood stage, spilling into the city and surrounding neighborhoods. As the waters are now receding, cleanup and recovery begins, as municipal workers begin to repair power supplies and water treatment plants, and residents return to their homes to recover what they can. An American flag hangs on a fence to dry as Lighthouse Christian School student Noah Jackson,12, cleans debris from his school athletic fields in Antioch, Tennessee. A vehicle rests upside down in a sink hole which opened on West Forest Avenue during heavy storms just west of Madison County General Hospital on Saturday, May 1, 2010 in Jackson, Tennessee. The vehicle's driver was rescued and taken to the hospital.

Share/Bookmark

view Flooding in Tennessee as presented by: Boston Big Picture


As Nashville’s Cumberland River continued to recede Wednesday, Mayor Karl Dean estimated the damage from weekend flooding could easily top $1 billion. The flooding and weekend storms killed at least 29 people in three states. The flooding caused by record-busting rains of more than 13 inches in two days sent water rushing through hundreds of homes, forcing thousands to evacuate – some by boat and canoe – affecting both rich and poor in this metropolitan area of about 1 million. Airplanes are seen partially submerged in floodwater at the Cornelia Fort Airpark Tuesday, May 4, 2010, in Nashville, Tenn. Heavy weekend rain caused the Cumberland River, which winds through Nashville, to over flow its banks flooding part of downtown and other areas around the city. Linda Steuer wipes away tears as she looks at her flooded apartment Tuesday, May 4, 2010, at the Windover Apartment complex in Bowling Green, Ky. Nearly a dozen families were forced from their homes by flood waters. A car is washed up against a tree under a bridge on Sunday, May 2, 2010 in Nashville, Tenn. Severe storms dumped heavy rain on Tennessee for the second straight day.

Share/Bookmark

view Flooding and the Aftermath in Nashville as presented by: Denver Post


Flooding on a scale rarely seen in New England forced hundreds of people from their homes Wednesday, overwhelmed sewage systems to the point that families were asked to stop flushing toilets, and washed out bridges and highways from Maine to Connecticut. Hardest hit by three days of record-breaking rain was Rhode Island, where the worst flooding in 200 years could persist for several more days and permanently close businesses already struggling in the weak economy. Flood waters surround the Warwick Mall in Warwick, R.I., Wednesday, March 31, 2010. Rhode Island rivers overflowed their banks, causing flooding and road closures after three days of record breaking rains. A submerged car sits on Dickinson Road March 31, 2010 in Fall River, Massachusetts. Heavy rains over the last few days have caused widespread flooding in New England, with rivers cresting well over high marks in what officials are calling a 50 year storm. Wayne Tavares takes what he can and evacuates his Perkins Street home as the Pawtuxett River over flows causing evacutions March 30, 2010 in Cranston, Rhode Island. The second major rain storm of March hammered the Northeast today causing flooding and evacuations. National Guard troops were activated in Massachusetts and Rhode Island where a state of emergency was declared.

Share/Bookmark

view Captured: Record Northeast Flooding as presented by: Denver Post



view our privacy policy & terms of service