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The beer is flowing and carnival rides running again at this year’s 179th Oktoberfest in Munich. Known as the world's largest beer festival, the event dates to 1810 when Crown Prince Ludwig was married to Princess Therese and the people of Munich were invited to attend the festivities. More than 6 million people are expected to attend this year’s festival, which runs until Oct. 7. A young man displays a beer mug in the Hofbraeuhaus tent after the opening of the famous Bavarian Oktoberfest beer festival in Munich, southern Germany, on Sept. 22. The world's largest beer festival, held from Sept. 22 to Oct. 7 will attract more than six million guests from around the world. Revelers toast after getting the first beer in the traditional one-litre "Masskrug" beer mugs at the opening day of the Munich Oktoberfest at the Theresienwiese. A traditional one-litre "Masskrug" beer mug is left behind on a beer garden table during heavy rain falls at the opening day of the Munich Oktoberfest.

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view Oktoberfest 2012 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


Das Oktoberfest! The biggest beer party in the world. Two weeks of beer, babes und bratwurst. The party has ended, but the photos prevail. GigaPica collected dozens of sharp images of not-so-sharp party people roaming the streets of Bavaria, occupying beer gardens and relieving themselves of copious amounts of food and alcohol, interspersed with fine images of beautiful German girls & women flaunting their luscious curves: the only reason anyone really cares about the tradition and the costumes of Oktoberfest.

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view Beer and Oktoberfest 2012 as presented by: GigaPica


The taps were flowing and the oom-pah bands were oom-pahing again in Germany. It’s Oktoberfest time, and the world’s largest festival celebrating beer reportedly attracted some 6 million visitors this time around before the taps ran dry earlier this week. The origin of the event dates back to 1810 when Crown Prince Ludwig was married to Princess Therese and the people of Munich were invited to attend the festivities. Only beer brewed within the city limits of Munich can be served at the festival. Revelers attend the last and sunny day of Oktoberfest beer festival on Oct. 2 in Munich, Germany. A Bavarian rifleman in traditional costume stands in front of the 'Bavaria' statue in Munich. Participants of the traditional costume and riflemen's procession during day 2 of the 2011 Oktoberfest.

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view Oktoberfest 2011 as presented by: Boston Big Picture


The mayor of Munich tapped the first keg to kick off the 178th traditional German folk festival Oktoberfest last Saturday. More than six million guests from around the world are expected to descend on the beer tents of Munich to celebrate Oktoberfest which runs until Oct. 3.Last year's visitors consumed some 7.1 million 2-pint (1-liter) mugs of beer. German authorities have increased the security around the fairgrounds this year, although they say no concrete threat exists. A waitress serves ten full large mugs of Spaten beer at the opening of the Oktoberfest beer festival in Munich on Saturday, Sept. 17, 2011. The 178th edition of the world's biggest beer festival, which is expected to attract around six million visitors, runs until October 3. Young people lift up their beer steins after the official opening of the famous Bavarian "Oktoberfest" beer festival in a beer tent in Munich, southern Germany, on Saturday, Sept.17, 2011. A young woman poses with a beer mug in the Hofbraeuhaus-tent after the opening of the famous Bavarian "Oktoberfest" beer festival in a beer tent in Munich, southern Germany, on Saturday, Sept.17, 2011.

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view Beer Flows As Germany Hosts The Oktoberfest as presented by: Sacramento Bee


They are a nation famed for efficiency and cleanliness. And it seems that those traits even apply to the campsite at one of their most famous international events. This was the scene at the campsite at Oktoberfest yesterday as lines of tents were neatly pitched in rows for use by festival-goers. It is marked contrast to British events such as Glastonbury, where every conceivable inch of ground is covered by a canvas city. However how long the tents remain in such neat and tidy rows remains to be seen - as the beer festival got into full swing yesterday. And for anybody concerned that Europe's biggest drink festival would run out of beer, they need not worry. Organisers at the festival have now installed oil pipeline technology to keep the pints flowing. The 1,000ft long pipeline runs underground to the main tent at the Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany, which can hold 8,400 thirsty punters in one sitting. Brewers have plumbed in the pipe to stop bar staff worrying about when the barrels of ale are about to run out. The festival runs for over two weeks, and is expected to attract over six million visitors and seven million litres of beer will be drunk. Pipeline technician Uwe Daebel led a trial beer run with a group of willing helpers and described it as a 'great success.' He added: 'We filled the glasses of everyone, but, sadly, the rest went down the drain because we couldn't leave it in the pipeline.' The pipeline is not the only innovation introduced this year by the organisers who are also catering for couples feeling amorous after a few frothy lagers. Special soundproofed 'bonk-boxes' have been set up on the nearby camp site where they can canoodle in private. The converted containers include a double bed, soft lighting and layers of sound-deadening insulation which mean other guests on the site won't be disturbed. 'They're a great idea because lots of people who come to Oktoberfest end up camping and tents are a terrible place to get intimate,' said one festival fan.

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view Trust The Germans To Regiment Tents At A Beer Festival! Oktoberfest Gets Underway as presented by: Daily Mail Online


It’s still September, but the world famous Oktoberfest has landed in Munich Germany. For the next two weeks millions of beer drinkers will drink millions of litres of beer and have a good time. A brass band in traditional Bavarian clothes takes part in the Parade of the Landlords and Breweries during the opening of the 178th Oktoberfest in Munich September 17, 2011. Millions of beer drinkers from around the world will come to the Bavarian capital over the next two weeks for the 178th Oktoberfest. A waitress carries the traditional 1-litre beer mugs at the opening of the Munich Oktoberfest September 17, 2011. The world's biggest beer fest runs until October 3. Visitors ride a 90-year-old chain-carousel on the opening day of Oktoberfest in Munich September 17, 2011. Millions of beer drinkers from around the world will come to the Bavarian capital over the next two weeks for the 178th Oktoberfest.

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view Oktoberfest as presented by: Totally Cool Pix


Munich in the German hop harvest began well known throughout the world as Oktoberfest. Exactly at noon the mayor Christian Ude, formally opened the first barrel of beer, and the first pint, according to tradition was prime minister of Bavaria Horst Seehofer. Although the measure of the Oktoberfest beer costs more than 9 euros, from early morning to Munich Theresienwiese meadows pulled crowds of people in traditional Bavarian costumes. Oktoberfest will take 17 days. Waitresses riding on the cart greet the participants have fun. The girl dressed in a dirndl is resting on the meadow near the Theresienwiese. Participants of the Oktoberfest on the background of the carousel.

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view A Little Rain Oktoberfest as presented by: 990 PX


On Saturday, the 178th Oktoberfest opened in Munich, Germany, with the traditional tapping of the first keg of beer by Munich's mayor, Christian Ude, shouting "O'zapft is!" ("It's tapped!"). The Bavarian festival takes place over 17 days, and some 6 million people are expected to attend. Last year, visitors drank more than 7 million one-liter mugs of beer. Attendance is free, but the beer will cost you: The price of a mug at any of the 14 tents this year comes to €9.20 ($12.60 U.S.). Gathered here are some of the scenes from Oktoberfest 2011's first weekend. People stretch out to reach a beer mug in the Hofbräuhaus-tent after the opening of Oktoberfest, in a beer tent in Munich, Germany, on September 17, 2011. Opening day of the 178th Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany.

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view Oktoberfest 2011 as presented by: The Atlantic


It's a wedding party that got out of control: Two hundred years ago, Bavaria's Crown Prince Ludwig celebrated his royal nuptials with a big public bash that was such a hit it became an annual event -- and came to be known worldwide as "The Oktoberfest." His bride, Princess Therese of Saxe-Hildburghusen, gave her name to the Theresienwiese festival grounds upon which the event welcomes more than 6 million people a year for towering mugs of beer, oompah music and bright traditional costumes. The "Wiesn" -- as Oktoberfest is locally known -- was put on hold for various reasons during its 200-year history, including the two World Wars, the Franco-Prussian war, and cholera epidemics. That makes this year the 177th edition. Young women laugh with beer steins in their hands after the opening of the Oktoberfest beer festival in Munich. Bavarian mountain riflemen stand during the opening ceremony of the "Historical Wiesn' in Munich, southern Germany. Overview of the Oktoberfest beer festival at the Theresienwiese in Munich.

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view Oktoberfest Marks 200 Years as presented by: Sacramento Bee


On Saturday, September 18th, with the tapping of the first keg by Munich Mayor Christian Ude and a cry of "O'zapft is!", Oktoberfest 2010 officially started in Munich, Germany. While this year marks the 177th Oktoberfest to be held, 2010 is the 200th anniversary of the very first Oktoberfest in 1810 (some years were missed due to war or cholera outbreaks). The Oktoberfest tradition started in 1810 to celebrate the October 12th marriage of Bavarian Crown Prince Ludwig to Princess Therese of Saxe-Hildburghausen. The citizens of Munich were invited to join in the festivities which were held over five days on the fields in front of the city gates. This year, festivities will run until October 4, 2010. Collected here are a few images from this opening weekend. Men in traditional Bavarian outfits participate in the traditional riflemen's parade of the Oktoberfest. A young woman wearing a traditional Bavarian "Dirndl" smiles as she receives a mug of beer in the Hofbrauhaus tent after the opening of the Oktoberfest beer festival at the Theresienwiese in Munich, southern Germany. Revelers reach out for a spilling mug of beer in the Hofbrauhaus tent after the opening of the Oktoberfest beer festival at the Theresienwiese in Munich.

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view Oktoberfest 2010 as presented by: Boston Big Picture



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